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Syria  - 
 
Great article here documenting a disturbing phenomenon that has seen scores of the biggest opposition Facebook pages in Syria simply disappear from view amid what appears to be an organised campaign by pro-regime activists. Pages that helped Storyful pinpoint the chemical attack on Eastern Ghouta have disappeared. Indeed, we noted the rapid acceleration of page closures in the wake of that massacre, starting with the pages closest to the epicentre of the attack. Since then, the closures have affected every corner of the country. From a journalistic point of view, Facebook pages that helped Storyful corroborate some of the most important content from Syria have been removed from the public domain. Most alarming of all is the suggestion here that there is little scrutiny of complaints that lead to the closures, and little recourse for those who find themselves censored. 

Quote: “We continue our reporting attacks,” read a typical post from December 9 on the SEA’s Facebook page. “Our next target is the Local Coordination Committee of Barzeh [a neighborhood in Damascus], the page that is a partner in shedding Syrian blood and provoking sectarian division.” It then provided two links to photos on the Barzeh page that could get the page taken down. Soon afterwards, the SEA removed its post as if it had never existed."
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Mark Antony's profile photoMadeleine Bair's profile photoFelim McMahon's profile photoChristopher Kingdon's profile photo
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I'm wondering if we can contact Facebook to discuss retrieving this information. I'm sure Storyful has more sway on this issue than anyone else, so I think it'd be well worth your time 
 
We'll certainly raise it. I think it's something that warrants explanation and attention.
 
wow, I was just trying to go to Kafranabl's FB page this morning, but figured I had the wrong link. Thanks for sharing. 
 
The list of disappeared pages is very long unfortunately +Madeleine Bair. Volumes of corroboration and context lost. 
 
Didn't even one of the affected pages use a backup service to preserve content? If not, I think this some advice worth sharing with page admins. 
 
I'm not sure what precautions are being taken by the page admins, but that's a very good question +Liss Nup. +Christopher Kingdon also asks how long FB is likely to keep page data offline after it has spiked these pages. A pertinent question in terms of future research/investigations perhaps. 
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