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Susannah Bodman
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Susannah Bodman

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YES! LOVE THIS! #PunkLives  :)
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Susannah Bodman

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Today Dr. John Holdren, President Obama's science advisor, issued a statement on proposed funding cuts to NASA's critical Earth science and space technology programs.

"The House bill would also gut the NASA “mission to planet Earth”—the satellite observations and related research that provide key measurements and insights relevant to forecasting and tracking hurricanes, fighting wildfires, observing the state of the world’s farms and forests, mapping the extent of droughts, measuring the stocks of groundwater, and monitoring the likelihood of landslides."

Read the full statement here: wh.gov/iBsj5 
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Human Spaceflight & Operations image of the week: ESA astronaut Claude Nicollier working with a power screwdriver during a spacewalk to repair the +Hubble Space Telescope in 2000. This week marks 25 years since the launch of Hubble on 24 April 1990.

Details: http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2000/09/Claude_Nicollier_repairing_Hubble

#Hubble25  
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Apes are cool. 
 
New on the Loom! The day Darwin stepped into a cage with an orangutan. http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/21/when-darwin-met-another-ape/
On March 28, 1838, Charles Darwin paid a visit to the London Zoo. At age 29, he was far from the scientific celebrity he would eventually become. It had only been two years since his return from hi...
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Cool pic. I had two immediate and irreverent thoughts when I saw it. Can you guess what those were?
 
Today's CometWatch from Rosetta is another single frame NAVCAM image taken on 15 April, almost four hours after the one that was published last Friday. The new picture was obtained at about 165 km from the centre of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Details: http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/04/20/cometwatch-15-april-4-hours-later/

#67P #Rosetta #cometwatch  
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Doctors Don't Always Ask About Pet-Related Health Risks

"If you're being treated for cancer, an iguana might not be the pet for you. Ditto if you're pregnant, elderly or have small children at home. Pets can transmit dozens of diseases to humans, but doctors aren't always as good as they should be in asking about pets in the home and humans' health issues, a study finds."

Read more via @NPR.
People can pick up germs and parasites from their pets, and some of them can be nasty. Health care providers for all species could do a better job of communicating the risks, a study finds.
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Susannah Bodman

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A new #science  roundup, featuring some good news for science communicators, the trickiness of sexing dinosaurs and some humanoid mushrooms.
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Very strange, we are so much excited about so many mystry of universe . We always talk about NASA , MARS and so many concept. But we never thought about the pholosophy of life. Never thought. Dont forget untill or unless we are not judge ourself internally we cant prove our suparmacy in the universe. So first we must think about the chief objectives of life
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What ARE those spots on #Ceres? Vote: http://go.nasa.gov/1FkYuhN

Can you guess what's creating those unusual bright spots on Ceres? On March 6, NASA's Dawn spacecraft began orbiting Ceres, the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Even before the spacecraft arrived at the dwarf planet, images revealed mysterious bright spots that captivated scientists and observers alike. Until Dawn gets a closer look over the next few months, it's anyone's guess what those spots could be.
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Humpback Whale Population Grows, Animals Proposed to be Removed From Endangered Species Act

"The federal government on Monday proposed removing most humpback whale populations in the world from the endangered species list, saying the majestic animal's numbers have dramatically recovered in the nearly 50 years since commercial whaling was banned." Read more from the +San Jose Mercury News.
In a major environmental success story, the federal government on Monday proposed removing most humpback whale populations in the world from the endangered species list, saying the majestic whales' numbers have dramatically recovered in the nearly 50 years since commercial whaling was banned.
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Wow.
 
Florida and Cuba waking up with the dawn 5 April 2015, from the #OrbitalPerspective of astronauts and cosmonauts living and working together in space. Credit: NASA
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Especially when it contains an espresso maker. :)
 
L+145-L+147: Logbook

Well, the big news of the past few days is of course that Dragon has arrived! It’s always very special to watch a vehicle approach Station.

As big as ISS is, this human outpost in space is only a tiny speck of metal in the vastness of Low Earth Orbit: and yet on Friday morning, as Terry and I monitored from the Cupola, a cargo ship from Earth found us and came knocking at our door. 

I enjoyed watching Dragon getting bigger and bigger, as continents and oceans passed by beneath, but I also consciously tried to detach myself from the romantics of it all to remain focused on my main task ahead: operating the robotic arm to capture Dragon.

It’s something I have practiced hundreds of times on the simulator, mostly with the virtual vehicle moving around a lot more than a real Dragon usually does, but doing it for real is of course quite different:  let’s say that it’s one of those situations when it doesn’t take much to become very famous for all the wrong reasons!

Fortunately everything went well and, after capture, the ground team took control of the arm to slowly berth Dragon to Node 2 nadir – it’s now basically an extra room just outside our crew quarters. On Friday I performed the vestibule leak check. As you might remember, the vestibule is that space between the berthed vehicle and the ISS, a little corridor that is formed when the two are joined. Before we open the hatch of ISS we need to make sure that the vestibule is not leaking, hence we pressurize a little, to ca. 260 mmHg, and then verify the pressure again after a certain interval of time. Vestibule passed the leak check, then Scott and I opened the ISS hatch and worked a couple of hours on getting the vestibule ready, mainly removing components that are not needed while Dragon is berthed and are in the way of… opening the Dragon hatch!

Scott and Terry opened the Dragon hatch yesterday morning and that was the beginning of a weekend of intense work, getting out urgent cargo and starting the science activities, many of which are on a very tight schedule due to degradation of samples as time passes.

As soon as the big bags were out of the Dragon center volume, my task was to retrieve a new Kubik, the stand-alone centrifuge-incubators I mentioned in the last logbook, (https://plus.google.com/+SamanthaCristoforetti/posts/fyeELbtxCjt) and get it setup and configured to support two cell biology experiments, Cytospace and NATO, both of which started yesterday afternoon and will continue autonomously for a few days, when it will be time to remove the experiment containers from Kubik and put them in the freezer, waiting for return to Earth for analysis.

Cytospace, as the name suggests, looks at the cellular cytoskeleton, the structures within the cell that give it its shape. How does microgravity affect the shape of the cell? And, most importantly, how do changes in the cell shape affect gene expression? This sounds like a complicated concept, but in the end it simply means that the shape of the cell, which is changed by microgravity, likely affects the way the cell does its job. And we’re really interested in understanding this better because… well, we’re made of cells and what happens in the cells determines what happens in our body as a whole. And vice versa, what we observe in entire systems of our body, for example in term of bone loss or impairment of the immune system, can be explained by changes at the level of the cell.

Next time I’ll talk to you about NATO!

Futura mission website (Italian): Avamposto42
avamposto42.esa.int

#SamLogbook +futura42 

(Trad IT)  Traduzione in italiano a cura di +AstronautiNEWS
qui: http://www.astronautinews.it/tag/logbook

(Trad FR) Traduction en français par +Anne Cpamoa ici: https://spacetux.org/cpamoa/category/traductions/logbook-samantha

(Trad ES) Tradducción en español por +Carlos Lallana Borobio
aqui: http://laesteladegagarin.blogspot.com.es/search/label/SamLogBook

(Trad DE)  Deutsch von http://www.logbuch-iss.de
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California Drought Graphics

Here are the graphics from yesterday's article in the San Francisco Chronicle (+SFGate ). The first shows how the "Ridiculously Resilient Ridge" has blocked storms from reaching California during the current drought. The other two show results from our recent paper analyzing the relationship between precipitation, temperature and drought in California. One timeseries figure shows historical climate observations, and the other shows climate model simulations.

The +SFGate article is here:
http://www.sfchronicle.com/science/article/New-normal-Scientists-predict-less-rain-from-6209104.php?cmpid=gplus-premium

The original peer-reviewed paper co-authored with +Daniel Swain and +Danielle Touma in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is here:
http://www.pnas.org/content/112/13/3931.abstract

And some of the stories and videos from +Stanford University are here:

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2015/march/temperatures-california-drought-030215.html

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/september/drought-climate-change-092914.html

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/february/drought-climate-change-022714.html

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/february/videos/1321.html

#climatechange   #globalwarming   #visualization   #CAdrought   #ridiculouslyresilientridge   #science   #sciencecommunication  
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Have her in circles
68 people
Vitali Yanushchyk's profile photo
Greg Laden's profile photo
Dutch Air's profile photo
Shannon Moore's profile photo
Chij Jung Gurung's profile photo
Foxcrawl Holland's profile photo
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Science blogger, freelance journalist, medical research lab volunteer
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aka Sciwhat on Twitter, Blogger and Facebook
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Science blogger, medical research lab volunteer and recent biology grad. Was both a journalist and an archaeologist in another life. Alumna of STS-135 NASA Tweetup. Dancer, swimmer and devout nerd.
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