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Martin Edwards
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SS-GB - BBC TV review
SS-GB , one of the most renowned books by the justly renowned Len Deighton, was first published in 1978. The first episode appeared on BBC TV tonight, so it's taken a very long time to reach the screen, but it was definitely worth the wait. We were treated ...

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Forgotten Book - Somebody at the Door
The British Library has done crime fans a service by republishing Raymond Postgate's admirable crime novel Verdict of Twelve , but today I want to talk about that book's much less renowned successor, Somebody at the Door , first published in 1943. It's a st...

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Twinges of Regret?
One of the pleasures of the writing life comes from interactions with readers. I find the feedback of those who are kind enough to read my books, and this blog, quite fascinating. Occasionally, as with reviews, the feedback is either eccentric or less than ...

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Forgotten Book - You Play the Black and the Red Comes Up
First published in 1938, You Play the Black and the Red Comes Up, is a classic of hardboiled American crime writing. Yet the author, Eric Knight (who originally published the novel under the pen-name Richard Hallas) was an Englishman, born in West Yorkshire...

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Unforgotten series 2 and Apple Tree Yard
Unforgotten (ITV) and Apple Tree Yard (BBC) are two high profile crime dramas that have both come to an end this week. The storylines are very different, but they have something in common - a focus on cruel and violent sexual abuse. The series also boast su...

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The Golden Age of Murder in paperback
Tomorrow marks a milestone in my writing career, as The Golden Age of Murder appears in paperback in the UK for the first time, not quite two years after the original hardback publication. To say that this has been a lucky book for me is an under-statement....

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Gerald and Chris Verner - a fascinating collaboration
Gerald Verner was a prolific writer of crime and thriller stories, sometimes under his own name, sometimes under pseudonyms. I've recently become interested in his work, and luckily enough I was put in touch with his son Chris and his agent Philip. Chris to...

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The Broken Horseshoe - 1953 film review
The Broken Horseshoe is a thriller based on a serial by Francis Durbridge. The director, Martyn C.Webster, had a long association with Durbridge from the Thirties onwards, and was a key influence on Durbridge's radio career, while Peter Coke, who plays the ...

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Forgotten Book - The Sixteenth Stair
E.C.R. Lorac published The Sixteenth Stair in 1942. As usual, it features her low-key but appealing cop, Inspector Macdonald, and as so often in books written during the first part of her career, it is set in central London. A family called the Hazelys are ...

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Death at Broadcasting House - 1934 film review
Thanks to the wonderful channel Talking Pictures, I've caught up with the film of a book I wrote about in The Golden Age of Murder. And what a terrific period piece it is. I can't easily recall any film from the early days of the talkies that I've enjoyed s...
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