Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Jacob Silvia
strong supporter of free speech
strong supporter of free speech
About
Posts

I turned off ReSharper, and wow, I didn't know that Visual Studio could run without halting every few seconds.

#resharper #visualstudio
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Next up on Amazon, either a Prime rate hike, or all their warehouses will be their own "independent" companies with no more than 499 employees.

That, or we'll start to see more robots. Hopefully, they won't need food stamps.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
You know where else you can find people recommending expunging dangerous ideas? Nineteen Eighty-Four and Fahrenheit 451.

I am successfully raising a child that has no concept of racism or that people with different skin color are inherently any different than her (beside skin pigmentation).

And she definitely hasn't been taught the myth of "White Privilege," because we don't teach her fairy tales as fact.

If you find a book to be offensive, then don't read it. Sure, find an analog, or rewrite it if you must, but don't expect everybody else to think you have found/created a suitable replacement.

In our reading of literary classics, we mine for gems. Occasionally we find a lump of coal in outdated ideas. These ideas can burn hot when they find the right spark, but we don't use them when we realize the effect they have on our environment.

In the end, if you look hard enough, you'll find something reprehensible about anybody. It's our job to learn from the mistakes and appreciate the success.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
When I was in high school, I took Economics from Myers. He was very nice and kind to me, and when he saw me reading Isaac Asimov, he loaned me a copy of Dune. When I finished that book, he loaned me the rest of the Dune books, which I devoured. When I finished the last one, he told me after class to come find him after school. I did. Then, we went out to his car. There, he opened his trunk, and in it was a trove of classic SF/Fantasy novels, which he gave me (most of which I still have). And that's all that happened.

In retrospect, this is shocking to discover. He claimed himself to be a "voluntary celibate" on his AOL profile, and would occasionally have students over at his house (I was never invited, so I would only hear about it from the Akron kids in Economics the following day). He was always very nice to me, but in a genuine way, and I came to respect him for his intelligence and his sense of humor. In a way, he helped me find my identity as I made the transition from High School student to College Student.

I'm not going to get rid of those books, because I don't think in black and white terms like that. They're not a reminder of an alleged pedophile, but rather, a reminder of someone who had a profound positive impact on my life.

Yes, this causes me to lose respect for Myers. But I still appreciate his influence on me.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Schwab presents a nice strawman on the "dangerous" idea of labeling Tolkien as "required reading" for Fantasy writers.

The main reason it's required has nothing to do with "well I read it, and wouldn't be here without it," and everything to do with the fact that Tolkien fundamentally changed Fantasy with his books.

It would be akin to scoffing at the notion that Bertrand Russel is required reading for logicians.

While I detest Tolkienoid writing, I understand and appreciate the requirement that all serious Fantasy authors read Tolkien, if at the very least to give us something fresh. It has nothing to do with a white guy achieving power, and everything to do with a meek, completely normal person saving the world without being a hidden prince or the subject of a prophecy or some person with untapped magical plot power.

While we're at it, Michael Moorcock should be required reading as well. His stories tell the exact opposite story: emperor falls from grace, and just can't get a break no matter how hard he tries. And then his fiance, wife, and best friends all die in terrible ways.

I'll give Schwab a try (I think I managed to get a free book of her's somewhere, though it's literally LAST on my current ebook reading list), but I don't have very high expectations based on how she casually dismisses decent fantasy writing because it's too white, straight, or male. Quite a superficial way to judge work, if you ask me.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Based on their "beeping", I imagine that SYSK censors don't understand railroad terms like "balls out."

That, or they have a low opinion of the intelligence of their audience.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
You Know You've Made It, When...

Your website is cited by Chinese Wikipedia.
Add a comment...

Amused by the Radiolab episode "X &Y"

Paraphrase:

"Who is Daniel Webster?"

"Some boring white dude."

"They were all racist. And sexist."

Yeah...
Add a comment...

TFW you google a literary character to find out if he/she's been in more books, and your website is the first hit.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The silliest thing about this is: the government is getting in trouble for violating copyright. The government, which grants copyright to private citizens and corporations, has been found guilty of copyright infringement.

There's a lot wrong with this. First, there's the issue of whether or not (all) photographs should be covered by copyright. Or, at least, all photographs taken by humans. Then, there's the issue that the government had to license said photograph from copyright extortionist firm, Getty Images. Then, there's the issue that licensing that photograph for commercial purposes WAS NOT ENOUGH, because the statue. Then, there's the question of whether a photograph of a statue should even constitute copyright infringement (does a picture act as a suitable replacement for a statue? How about just a picture of the "face" part of the statue?). Then, there's the fact that the USPS is a government entity (the executive branch; you know, the branch responsible for executing the laws passed by congress, including copyright).

Beyond that, I'm sure that $3.5m in damage did not actually happen. It's more a case of the post office profited from a series of unfortunate mistakes, and someone wanted a bit o' that scratch.

Also, I'm dreading the inevitable postage rate increase to cover this sort of crap.

Let's just have public domain artwork on our stamps from now on, so we don't need to undercut the post office by paying "license fees" for imaginary property.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded