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Lee Wilson
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Disability Access Consultant, advocate for dignified equitable access into and throughout the built environment, supporter of human and animal rights.
Disability Access Consultant, advocate for dignified equitable access into and throughout the built environment, supporter of human and animal rights.

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This weekend is Easter, and whilst not everyone celebrates the religious aspects to the holiday, many people take advantage of the long weekend to travel, visit friends and attend various events such as festivals and markets across the country.

If you are involved in planning or working in any of these events over the long weekend, please consider how the event will cater for everyone.

Disability discrimination occurs when people are treated less fairly because they have a disability, or because they are relatives, friends, carers, co-workers or associates of a person with a disability. Disability discrimination can occur directly or indirectly and this relates to event management and event spaces too.

https://leewilson.com.au/2018/03/26/making-festivals-and-markets-accessible-for-everyone/
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NEW YORK: The United Arab Emirates has organised two panel discussions at the United Nations during its participation in the 10th Conference of State Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, CRPD, in cooperation with Dr. Victor Pineda, President of Pineda Foundation, World Enabled and GAATES.

The panel focused on women, children, and adolescents, and disability in humanitarian emergencies and using information and communications technology, ICT, to promote innovation and inclusion in urban centres.

The #UAE Permanent Mission to the UN organised a panel, titled, “Access and Dignity Displaced: Women, Adolescents and Children with Disabilities in Humanitarian Emergencies” with the Permanent Mission of #Norway to the UN and World Enabled. The discussion focused on gender and disability narratives in humanitarian planning and response, addressing the need for and delivery of services for persons that are most likely to be left behind.
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The Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB) is undertaking a project in relation to the Increased Use and Quantification of Performance. This forms part of the project attempting to create an enabling environment for the increased use and acceptance of Performance Solutions.

As a part of this project the ABCB are examining the use of Performance Solutions as a means of showing compliance with the NCC Performance Requirements in the area of disability access.
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New technology means big improvements to passenger lift destination control systems, and these improvements can help speed up travel times, improve efficiency and provide benefit for some people with disabilities.

Destination control systems (DCS) – or destination-oriented lift systems – are not a new concept. In fact, they have been around for decades, but their use is now increasing as technology advances. This technology is actually an Australian invention first developed in Sydney in 1961 and patented by Leo Port MBE, who would later become the Lord Mayor of Sydney from 1978 until his death three years later.

When a person arrives in a building with a DCS, they enter their desired destination level into an input panel or keypad in the lift landing area. They are then directed to a lift based on availability, efficiency of the system and grouping of people traveling to the same level. In more modern systems, an electronic swipe card reader can also record desired destination information for more convenience and ease of use.

The DCS differs from the conventional lifts we seen and used for many years. The lift cars within a DCS have no buttons for each level. The buttons will usually be limited to an emergency call button, and buttons to open and close doors. When entering a lift car, it already knows the level you are traveling to and will automatically move to that level, arrive, and announce your arrival without the need to touch any buttons within the lift car.
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Passenger lift destination control systems are already appearing in buildings, but we need to consider universal design and the needs of people with disability in their design.

Don Norman, an academic, author, and advocate for human-centred design, suggested there are barriers to the adoption and use of destination control systems (DCS). This was discussed in his book The Design of Everyday Things, where he commented on the design of conventional lifts, first installed in buildings in the late 1800s.

At that time, there was always an attendant who operated the controls within each lift car. When lifts were automated with controls, people just started pressing buttons to move the lift car between levels. This approach was long accepted and remained unchanged until the advent of DCS. Norman believes the previous system was “a pretty inefficient way of doing things.”
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Why Open Captions?
Why Open Captions?
universalcaptions.com.au
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Deaf Auckland University student left alone during fire drill. PEEPs, GEEPs and visual alarms would have helped to reduce the chance of this happening - http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/82752713/Deaf-Auckland-University-student-left-alone-during-fire-drill?cid=app-iPhone
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If you consider the potential of being left in your workplace which is on fire whilst all your work colleagues gather outside at an ultimate place of safety as being a nightmare prospect, then you may wish to consider the following.
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Australia needs a non-regulatory handbook to provide the building and construction industry with best practice advice on emergency egress for people with disability.
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The Deaf community live in a world designed for people who can hear, but a new design movement challenges how buildings should be built, where sensory experiences and interaction with the fabric of the building takes precedence.
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