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Theodio
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Classic theology brought to life for a new generation in beautiful audio and stunning text.
Classic theology brought to life for a new generation in beautiful audio and stunning text.

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Why, should we, who have Christ the conqueror on our side— fear the conquered world? -
Thomas Brooks https://buff.ly/2AHL7dm
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“The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting. It has been found difficult and left untried.” – G.K. Chesterton

Read the latest on Theodio. https://buff.ly/2yXgxz7
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The treasures of a saint ... (Thomas Brooks) https://buff.ly/2xKdTvU
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What do we Christians do when we’re tempted to avoid fellowship, discipleship, and the blessed means of grace due to fear of loss, pain, and suffering? https://buff.ly/2yd7GaR
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"Afflictions are a crystal glass, wherein the soul has the clearest sight of the ugly face of sin. In this glass the soul comes to see sin to be but a bitter-sweet; yes, in this glass the soul comes to see sin not only to be an evil— but to be the greatest evil in the world, to be an evil far worse than hell itself." - Thomas Brooks, Precious Remedies against Satan's Devices https://buff.ly/2ePDiJ1
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While editing the Precious Remedies audiobook this morning, this sentence struck me. I had already read it once when I read the entire book through. Then again as I narrated the audio. For some reason, this time it sunk in. It was so familiar to me. Then I realized ... fire and water. This sounds like the story of Horatio Spafford.

The man who wrote "It Is Well with My Soul," after he lost a large portion of his estate in the great Chicago fire of 1871, and then lost his four daughters two years later in an accident at sea.

Fire and water. Loss and tragedy. "Whatever my lot, thou hast taught me to say, it is well with my soul."

Thomas Brooks wrote these words 221 years before Spafford penned his hymn. I wonder if Spafford ever read Brooks. And I wonder if it was before or after his life made this rhetorical question a reality. https://buff.ly/2wp2ksC
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We continue through this first device against Christian devotion with Brooks’ final four remedies. This second half illustrates how the promise of better things in Christ, based on God’s eternal promises to us, can help us look beyond temporal pleasures. https://buff.ly/2wlIiPL
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Satan can present the world as so enticing and alluring that Christians may forsake their devotion to God to run after its riches and pleasures. There is much in the world that is beautiful, that brings joy and pleasure, that creates more emotional and even spiritual excitement than religious duty. The enemy can easily use these truths to his advantage. https://buff.ly/2vRDJMJ
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King Henry the Fourth asked the Duke of Alva if he had observed the great eclipse of the sun ... https://buff.ly/2fp50Qk
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We Christians must be salt and light to the world. We must be in and not of the world as we proclaim the gospel. But we also must discern when it is time to walk away from certain people for whom our message is nothing but bitterness and gall. Thomas Brooks helps us recognize when the influence of wicked people is too great for us to bear and will become a temptation to sin. #theology #puritan #sanctification http://buff.ly/2uFQ6II
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