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Ethan Duffy
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Hundreds of people cycling out of the roads, asking for it to be safe when they are out on the roads on their own.  This is happening in Birmingham on monday, and similar rides may happen in cities near you! #space4cycling  #transport #cycling #manchester

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Wonderful start to this bus journey, once it eventually set off!  Glad I didn't decide to trek up the hills!
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Frank review - A real-life forgotten tale becomes rip-roaring fiction

I often have a bit of a hurdle to cross with stories which centre around composing music.  In depicting any creative process, you either have to pretend that it’s much more straightforward than it is, or accept that the audience will be watching a mostly internal, ephemeral process.  Frank threw me a major bone with it’s central character, Jon, who has not a creative bone in his body. 

So, when he is thrust into being a member of a deeply experimental band with several unstable members, I was right there with him!  There are several difficult characters, and butting heads with the straightforward, boring Jon (Domhall Gleeson) is an great way to explore them.  The performances are excellent, with Michael Fassbender proving he doesn’t need his face or discernible words to be terrifically watchable, and Maggie Gyllenhaal brings humanity to a viciously severe and closed-off role.  ‘Frank’ also needs convincingly promising musical ideas, which the film pulls off, if anything going too far at marking out the bad ideas as terrible.

This oversteer is probably due to Jon Ronson’s humility in transposing his own part of the story, the screenwriter being in real life, Frank Sidebottom/Chris Sievey’s keyboardist for a time.  The film is very much not a biopic, a very surreal affair that is willing to change anything to be more relevant to the modern age, bearing very much the mark of a successful journalist used to finding an ‘angle’, but still retaining a little of the veracity of a real-life tale, though it moves from Trafford to Texas and doesn’t use the word ‘Sidebottom’ once, which will probably hurt the film’s impact on the potential to revitalise the late musician/comedian’s work.

As with the recent, though tonally opposite, Inside Llewyn Davies, the film deals with the purpose of creative endeavour.  Is it meaningless without an audience, and when does it become unacceptable to change your image or content for listeners/success?  ‘Frank’ would probably never have been made without aggressively pursuing accessibility in this fascinatingly strange tale, so while the plot may show the ruin of ‘selling out’, the film itself shows the perks of looking for mainstream appeal (or funding) with a deft touch.
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Clamouring for bike parking at mediacity.  For developers (In this case Peel), cycling is a nice thing for a few people to do, not a real logistical concern.
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