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Ender Muab'Dib
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350 followers
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You have a task assigned to you, and you don't like it. You are simply not in the mood. You don't know how to fix that damn bug. You have no idea how that bloody module was designed, and you don't know how it works. But you have to fix the issue, which was reported by someone who has no clue how this software works. You get frustrated and blame that stupid project manager and programmers who were fired two years ago. You spend hours just to find out how the code works. Then even more hours trying to fix it. In the end, you miss the deadline and everybody blames you. Been there, done that? Here is a list of options you have, in order of preference. I would recommend you start with the first one on the list and proceed down when you have to.

Be professional and say "No, I can't do this; find someone else." Being a professional developer doesn't mean being able to fix any problem. Instead, it means honesty. If you see that you can't fix the problem, say so as soon as possible. Let them decide what to do. If they eventually decide to fire you because of that, you will remain a professional. They will remember you as a guy who was honest and took his reputation seriously. In the end, you will win.
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I strongly believe that while it is very effective to structure an organization in a democratic and sociocratic way, a project should be managed completely different. A project should resemble a dictatorship, authoritarian or military hierarchy with a single strong, result-oriented leader who gives explicit orders that are never doubted by subordinates and an explicitly defined hierarchy.

Because of this fundamental difference, a project must be managed by an authoritative person who gives orders and has enough guts to ensure those orders are obeyed. That person is called a project manager (PM). And the project will be successful only if its management structure is strictly hierarchical, just like in a military operation. A project cannot be flat, or it will fall apart.
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Featured today on DaedTech, how to turn your resume into something actually useful -- mining it for specialty opportunities: https://daedtech.com/become-software-specialist-help-resume/ #software #dev #career #freeagents
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SwiftKotlin is a framework, a command line tool and a Mac application for translating Swift code into Kotlin.
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Today we're releasing the source code for the official Google I/O 2018 for Android app. The 2018 version constitutes a comprehensive rewrite of the app. For many years, the app has used a ContentProvider + SyncAdapter architecture. This year, we rewrote the app using Architecture Components and brought the code in sync with the Android team's current recommendations for building modern apps.
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Señala que el responsable del máster permitió que un grupo de alumnos se sacaran el título "sin efectivamente cursarlo, sin mérito académico alguno". "Sólo se benefició a alumnos con una posición relevante en el ámbito político, institucional", aclara la jueza en su escrito al Supremo. La jueza plantea dudas sobre la veracidad de los trabajos de Casado y pide al Supremo que investigue cuándo fueron elaborados.
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I’ve been programming in Object Oriented languages for decades. The first OO language I used was C++ and then Smalltalk and finally .NET and Java. I was gung-ho to leverage the benefits of Inheritance, Encapsulation, and Polymorphism. The Three Pillars of the Paradigm. I was eager to gain the promise of Reuse and leverage the wisdom gained by those who came before me in this new and exciting landscape. I couldn’t contain my excitement at the thought of mapping my real-world objects into their Classes and expected the whole world to fall neatly into place. I couldn’t have been more wrong.
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To conclude this, Not writing tests is not a problem of time. Its a problem of understanding and attitude. Tests save time in short and long run. A developer gets paid for his/her time. For business money is proportional to time. For enterprises this is a lot of money and quality is also at stake. No business would want to take risk by being okay with developers not writing tests.
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Can you be absolutely sure that your app is free from all critical bugs? Can you be confident enough that there are no major crashes hiding somewhere in your app? Will your app work in the same way and without any issues in all Android versions? No, certainly not. Let’s talk a bit about how you can release your apps as effectively as possible ensuring that your users have the most stable and best possible experience that they deserve.
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