Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Quick Weight Loss Club
6 followers
6 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
5 things you didn't know about Christine Lagarde
Sheena McKenzie and Phoebe Parke, for CNN
Updated 1450 GMT (2250 HKT) January 20, 2015
spc leading women christine lagarde_00015309
How hardship fueled Lagarde's success 02:54
Story highlights
She's the face of the IMF, but how well do you know her?
Five surprising facts about French financial powerhouse, Christine Lagarde
Says death of her father as a teenager was 'a pivotal moment'
Leading Women connects you to extraordinary women of our time. This month we're celebrating '"Money Women" with a special series looking at the women who control global finance. We start with an in-depth interview with Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the International Monetary Foundation (IMF).

(CNN)In a line-up of the world's financial heavyweights, Christine Lagarde commands attention. At almost 6ft tall, with a head of silver hair and year-long tan, the first female to lead the International Monetary Fund instantly stands out in the notoriously masculine world of finance.

When the fifth most powerful woman in the world according to Forbes takes to the stage, journalists make sure their pens are poised. And in a time of economic austerity -- not to mention scandal allegations regarding the IMF's former managing director -- the media spotlight on Lagarde is fierce.

But away from the camera lens, what personal events shaped the 59-year-old financial leader we know today?

Here are five things you might not know about Lagarde.

1.) Her father died of a motor neuron disease when she was a teenager
"Clearly the death of my father when I was 16 was a pivotal moment because you suddenly realize the hardship, the pain," Lagarde told CNN's Gabriella Frias.

"It certainly provided me with a better understanding of how tough it can be for a single mother to raise kids."

2.) She was a member of the French national synchronized swim team
Lagarde won a bronze medal in the French National Championship when she was just 15-years-old.

Synchronized swimming might also have more in common with politics than you think. "It was synchronized swimming that taught me: 'Grit your teeth and smile,'" Lagarde told the Guardian.

3.) She once walked out of an important job interview
"It was when I applied to the biggest law firm in Paris and I was told that I would be a great recruit and that I would be given good work to do -- but that I should never expect to make partnership because I was a woman," Lagarde told CNN.

"I thought to myself: 'You don't deserve me, I'm going.' And I had that sense of extraordinary freedom, walking down the staircase and thinking to myself: 'What would I do in this firm? Why would I work with that kind of attitude?"

4.) She twice failed to enter France's National School of Administration, the elite school for civil servants
"For a while I felt sort of held back and I decided: 'No, no, no, no, no, no you have to get over it,'" Lagarde told CNN.

"You need to try to take the learnings from that failure and ask yourself: 'Why did I fail?' Then you learn about it and you move on."

5.) She was born on New Year's Day
It's perhaps fitting that the IMF boss -- who oversees the world's finances -- was born on such a neat date.

The eldest sister to three brothers, Lagarde was raised in Normandy to an English professor father and Latin teacher mother.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
And the world's most punctual airline is...
By Barry Neild, CNN
Updated 1908 GMT (0308 HKT) January 8, 2015
Of the eight North American airports in the Top 20, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is the best performer, with 86.2% of flights in and out on time. Alaskan Airlines is one of two U.S. operators ranked in the top 20 on-time carriers.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
8 of 15
Hawaiian Airlines is the best of the two U.S. carriers in OAG's top 20 punctuality list. The airline was ranked the world's second most punctual.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
9 of 15
Austrian Airlines is the third ranked carrier in the Punctuality League table for 2014. European operators dominate the top airline category, claiming 10 of the top 20 slots.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
10 of 15
Norwegian Air Shuttle performs the best among low-cost carriers with nearly nine out of 10 flights on time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
11 of 15
The best on-time carrier in Asia, Japan Airlines is ranked eighth globally, with 88.8% of flights arriving within 15 minutes of their scheduled times.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
12 of 15
Thai AirAsia places second in the category of low-cost carriers and second within all Asia airlines, with an average rate of 88.7% punctuality.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
13 of 15
EasyJet, the second largest European budget carrier, ranks eighth within European airlines, arriving as scheduled 87.7% of the time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
14 of 15
Only six airlines listed for the Middle East and Africa regions qualified for the OAG Punctuality League. Saudi Arabian Airlines is the top airline in the category.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
15 of 15
OAG, a UK-based aviation data group, has released its list of 2014's most punctual airports and airlines. The UK's Bristol Airport has the best on-time performance of all small, medium and large airports. An average of 94.4% of flights departed and arrived within 15 minutes of schedule.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
1 of 15
Based in Latvia, airBaltic beat out all other airlines with 94.9% of flights sticking close to schedule. The airline operated some 42,000 flights to 40 destinations from its base in Riga.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
2 of 15
Fifteen of the top 20 punctual airports are in Europe. Second only to Bristol, Brussels South Charleroi Airport kept to its schedules 93.1% of the time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
3 of 15
Flights arrived and departed Berlin Schoenefeld Airport punctually 92.3% of the time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
4 of 15
Munich Airport is the best large airport with 89% of incoming and outgoing flights on time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
5 of 15
Tokyo's Haneda Airport is the most efficient large airport in Asia with 87.9% of flights arriving and leaving on time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
6 of 15
Dubai's airport is the only aviation hub in the Middle East and Africa to rank within any of the punctuality top 20 lists.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
7 of 15
Of the eight North American airports in the Top 20, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is the best performer, with 86.2% of flights in and out on time. Alaskan Airlines is one of two U.S. operators ranked in the top 20 on-time carriers.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
8 of 15
Hawaiian Airlines is the best of the two U.S. carriers in OAG's top 20 punctuality list. The airline was ranked the world's second most punctual.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
9 of 15
Austrian Airlines is the third ranked carrier in the Punctuality League table for 2014. European operators dominate the top airline category, claiming 10 of the top 20 slots.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
10 of 15
Norwegian Air Shuttle performs the best among low-cost carriers with nearly nine out of 10 flights on time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
11 of 15
The best on-time carrier in Asia, Japan Airlines is ranked eighth globally, with 88.8% of flights arriving within 15 minutes of their scheduled times.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
12 of 15
Thai AirAsia places second in the category of low-cost carriers and second within all Asia airlines, with an average rate of 88.7% punctuality.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
13 of 15
EasyJet, the second largest European budget carrier, ranks eighth within European airlines, arriving as scheduled 87.7% of the time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
14 of 15
Only six airlines listed for the Middle East and Africa regions qualified for the OAG Punctuality League. Saudi Arabian Airlines is the top airline in the category.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
15 of 15
OAG, a UK-based aviation data group, has released its list of 2014's most punctual airports and airlines. The UK's Bristol Airport has the best on-time performance of all small, medium and large airports. An average of 94.4% of flights departed and arrived within 15 minutes of schedule.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
1 of 15
Based in Latvia, airBaltic beat out all other airlines with 94.9% of flights sticking close to schedule. The airline operated some 42,000 flights to 40 destinations from its base in Riga.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
2 of 15
Fifteen of the top 20 punctual airports are in Europe. Second only to Bristol, Brussels South Charleroi Airport kept to its schedules 93.1% of the time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
3 of 15
Flights arrived and departed Berlin Schoenefeld Airport punctually 92.3% of the time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
4 of 15
Munich Airport is the best large airport with 89% of incoming and outgoing flights on time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
5 of 15
Tokyo's Haneda Airport is the most efficient large airport in Asia with 87.9% of flights arriving and leaving on time.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
6 of 15
Dubai's airport is the only aviation hub in the Middle East and Africa to rank within any of the punctuality top 20 lists.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
7 of 15
Of the eight North American airports in the Top 20, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is the best performer, with 86.2% of flights in and out on time. Alaskan Airlines is one of two U.S. operators ranked in the top 20 on-time carriers.
Punctuality League: The most on-time airports and airlines in 2014 15 photos
Show Caption
8 of 15
punctual aviation bristol airportaviation airBalticaviation charleroi airport aviation Berlin Schoenefeld airportaviation Munich airport AirbräuTokyo haneda departure hallAirline Ratings 5 Emiratesaviation seattle airport12 top airlines 0404aviation austrian airlinesaviation norwegian air shuttleaviation japan airlinesThai AirAsia rage storyaviation easy jetaviation Saudia airlines
Story highlights
UK's small Bristol Airport outperforms larger rivals when it comes to timekeeping, according to OAG report
More than 94% of flights take off or land from Bristol on time -- better than any other airport worldwide
Small carriers top OAG's airline punctuality charts, with airBaltic taking the top honors
(CNN)Anyone stuck reading this while waiting for a delayed flight should take note: next time fly via Bristol Airport.

The small airport serving the southwest England port city has emerged as the world's most punctual aviation hub in 2014, outperforming some of the biggest destinations on the planet.

With connections to Europe and north Africa, Bristol managed to get 94.4% of its flights on or off the ground within 15 minutes of schedule, according to stats from UK-based aviation data monitors OAG.

It's a figure that might discomfit officials at the main airports serving London -- including Europe's busiest at Heathrow (75.5%) -- none of which made the top rankings, with the exception of London Luton.

That puts it top of the league not only for small airports, but also larger facilities.

John Grant, OAG executive vice president, says the findings of his company's first annual "Punctuality League" were positive, although many leading operators would probably be looking to up their game in 2015.

"With many airports and airlines achieving in excess of 90% on-time performance within 15 minutes of schedule there is a lot to celebrate," he said.

AirBaltic: The world's most punctual airline.
AirBaltic: The world's most punctual airline.
European destinations dominated the timekeeping list when it comes to small airports, with Bristol followed closely by Brussels South Charleroi Airport at 93.1% and Berlin Schoenefeld at 92.3%.

Japan's Osaka International Airport claimed the top spot for medium sized airports with 93.2%, followed by Moscow Sheremetyevo (89.8%) and Copenhagen Airport (89.8%).

The most punctual large air hub was named as Munich Airport (89%) -- a fact that'll do little to dispel stereotypes of German efficiency, but one that also highlights the five-year delay to Berlin's still unopened Brandenburg Airport.

Munich was followed by Tokyo Haneda at 87.9% and Seattle's Sea-Tac Airport at 86.2%.

The world's busiest air destination, Atlanta, was ranked 12th on the large airports list with a score of 82.4%. Dubai, at 14th with 82.3%, was the only Middle Eastern airport to make any of the top twenties.

In a week when it emerged that passengers spent 28 hours stuck on a delayed flight from Abu Dhabi to San Francisco, OAG's rankings for the world's most punctual airlines makes interesting reading.

Smaller operations again took the lead, with Latvia's airBaltic outperforming all others at 94.9%. Second and third were Hawaiian Airlines at 92.3% and Austrian Airlines at 90%.

The rest of the top 10 includes: Iberia (89.7%), KLM (89.4%), Saudi Arabian Airlines (89.4%), SAS (89.1%), Japan Airlines (88.8%), Finnair (88.6) and Alaska Airlines (88.5%).

Norwegian Air Shuttle was named the most punctual low-cost carrier, with almost nine out of 10 flights sticking to schedule. It was followed by Thai AirAsia and EasyJet.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The PDX factor: Portland airport's carpet inspires microbrews, memes and more
By Daisy Carrington, for CNN
Updated 0332 GMT (1132 HKT) January 26, 2015
Portland International Airport is about to replace its carpet. Portlanders are in mourning. 
Portland International Airport is about to replace its carpet. Portlanders are in mourning.
Story highlights
After 27 years, Portland International Airport is ditching its carpet
Portlanders are up in arms. Some have even tattooed the carpet design
(CNN)The city of Portland is about to lose one of its most beloved cultural institutions: its airport carpet.

Believe it or not, the carpet at Portland International Airport (or the PDX carpet, as it's referred to locally) has inspired everything from poetry to beer flavors. Local sports teams the Portland Timbers and Portland Trail Blazers have commemorated the rug by selling limited-edition T-shirts of the pattern in the team colors, and a handful of true fanatics have even had the design permanently etched onto their skin.


"It is definitely an endearing statement of how much (Portlanders) like the pattern," says Kama Simonds, a communications officer for Port of Portland.

The love affair is coming to an end, however, as the airport begins to rip up the 27-year old fixture this month. Portlanders, meanwhile, are in mourning. Since the carpet's impending demise was first announced, retailers of PDX-themed products can barely keep their swag on the shelves.


Jeremy Dunn, who sells socks with the PDX pattern through his online store, The Athletic Community, told Katu.com that the item has been a best-seller from the start.

"I made a small run of them just to sell to my friends. Now we can't keep up with the number of orders that we've got," he said.

The impending demise of the carpet has also inspired a Facebook page, three twitter accounts and an Instagram account -- all run independently by carpet groupies.

Ceara Chewning, who manages the PDX Carpet Facebook page, notes that the carpet has a certain "Je ne sais quois".


"It seems like in most places, the carpet is there to fade into the background, but this has such a bright, cheerful eye-grabbing pattern. It's also a symbol of making it home," explains Chewning.

"It's also ugly, but in a really cute, endearing way, and Portland seems to love that."


Despite the rampant nostalgia for the old floor covering, Simonds says the carpet is overdue for a replacement:

"We're starting to see more than general wear and tear. The seams are showing and you're seeing frayed edges. In some spots, it's so thread bear the underlying mat pokes through," she says.

"It's been on the floor for more than 20 years. Someone did a calculation and figured about 300 million people have passed over it."

The new carpet design, created by Hennebery Eddy Architects, hasn't quite received the same love (though it does at least have its own Twitter account).


"I get that the old design is cool. It's kind of quintessential 1980s, and it's like an old friend we don't want to leave behind, but it's OK to have a new friend, too," says Michelle Vo, principal at Hennebery Eddy.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Blatter says Uefa "lacks courage to come in" to FIFA presidential race
From Ursin Caderas and Paul Gittings, CNN
Updated 1053 GMT (1853 HKT) January 26, 2015
ws riddell pkg fifa president controversy_00015324
FIFA President: 'I have not finished my mission' 04:18
Story highlights
Sepp Blatter seeking fifth term as FIFA president
Three men have so far declared against him
Blatter challenges UEFA to nominate a candidate for election
Wants to work for a radio show if not re-elected
Follow us at @CNNSport and like us on Facebook

(CNN)Sepp Blatter has issued a defiant message to his rivals for the FIFA presidency and challenged European governing body UEFA to put up a candidate of its own in the election later this year.

Blatter, who is seeking a fifth term at the helm of world football's governing body, told CNN in an exclusive interview that he still had unfinished business and would not step aside without a fight.

"I have to say I have not finished my mission because it's a mission to be in football. We have started in 2011 with the reform process. The reform process is not over. I would like to have these four years to finish it and to show that football is more than a game."


Blatter's FIFA presidency challenger 02:11
PLAY VIDEO
But FIFA has been mired in controversy since its decision to award the 2018 and 2022 World Cups to Russia and Qatar.

Criticism reached a fever pitch when the man hired to investigate the bidding process for those World Cups, U.S. lawyer Michael Garcia, resigned in protest last year, unhappy that the published summary did not accurately reflect his findings.


FIFA's Blatter to seek Presidency again 02:26
PLAY VIDEO
Blatter has faced calls to stand down and although UEFA is yet to declare its official position, he clearly believes they are campaigning behind the scenes to depose him.

"They want to get rid of me," he told CNN.

"All this opposition is coming now it's unfortunate to say it, it's coming from Nyon, from UEFA. They don't have the courage to come in. "So let me go (on) - be respectful! Because in football you learn to win but you also learn to lose. So I'm going now. If I win the better, if I lose ok!"

A UEFA spokesman told CNN Sunday that they had no immediate comment to make over Blatter's remarks.

thomas ginola FIFA_00005912
David Ginola, the next FIFA president? 01:39
PLAY VIDEO
Three candidates have so far stated their intention to challenge Blatter; Frenchman Jerome Champagne, Prince Ali Bin Al Hussein of Jordan and former star footballer David Ginola.

All must get the backing of at least five of the 209 member associations of FIFA by a deadline of January 29th to get on the ballot paper for the election on May 29.

Blatter appears unfazed by his likely opponents, with or without another candidate throwing their hat into the ring at this late stage.


Can a Jordanian prince unseat current FIFA president? 03:41
PLAY VIDEO
"I have been asked by the national associations to be our candidate again because nobody that is strong was in. So I go there," he said.

He also appears to be relishing the fight ahead, despite closing on his 79th birthday in March.

"I'm now 40 years in FIFA. I've been the president since 1998.

"You know it is impossible to make everybody happy.

"If I would have only positive press then it would not be good. And I like criticism as long as the criticism is... I would say fair criticism. I like the discussion to go with that. But listen I've been there such a long time now and I just want to finish that," he added.

But perhaps at odds with his other comments, Blatter also called for unity in football, effectively inviting UEFA to put up or shut up.


Former FIFA advisor: "Blatter must go" 03:31
PLAY VIDEO
"Football is a team sport. Let's go together with the team. I invite the confederation of UEFA and especially the leaders of UEFA that are so bitterly attacking me: join! Join! Football is a unity. And we need this unity in this world."

And if he cannot find the necessary level of support and extend his tenure as the most powerful in world football, Blatter came up with a surprising choice of new career.

"The day I'm going to retire the first thing I'm going to do is radio. I always said I will do radio.

"Because radio is even more popular than television, than all electronics ... I said one day - this was my boy's wish - to be a radio reporter one day. I don't know but I'm not so bad."

The first indication of whether Blatter will be seeking out new horizons may well come on February 7th or 8th, the date he revealed to CNN when FIFA will make public the full list of qualified candidates for the election.

"Anyway, I'm in and I don't mind. It's not my first battle for the presidency. I still have the conviction and I believe in myself and I believe in football, " the Swiss said.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Интересные новости онлайн на Trial-News.RU
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
James Doran-Webb: How artistry won the driftwood derby
By Chris Borg, CNN
updated 5:41 AM EST, Fri December 12, 2014
Artist James Doran-Webb brings a whole new twist to the Chinese Year of the Horse... Artist James Doran-Webb brings a whole new twist to the Chinese Year of the Horse...
HIDE CAPTION
Driftwood horses
<<
<
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
James Doran-Webb uses driftwood to create stunning sculptures
Philippines-based artist builds three thoroughbreds for Singapore celebrations
Hundreds of pieces of wood are applied to metal skeleton to create art
Doran-Webb honed skills in parents' antiques restoration business
Follow us at @WorldSportCNN and like us on Facebook
(CNN) -- You've probably heard of Glorious Goodwood -- well, this is more like glorious driftwood.
Galloping along beaches or drinking quietly from a pool, these majestic horses aren't what they first seem.
That's because, not that long ago, they were just piles of what seemed like scrap wood -- until, that is, artist James Doran-Webb began working his magic.
 Looking to past champions for success Japan's rise to racing prominence The horse that won $110,000 for charity
Born in Birmingham, the 46-year-old has lived in the Philippines since traveling there for what was supposed to have been an extended holiday in 1989.
"I was entranced by the countryside, the beaches, the wildlife and the people, with their flair for color and artistry," he explained.
He's long been using driftwood collected from the seas, beaches and rivers near his Cebu City home to create his breathtaking wildlife art, and Doran-Webb's work is a continuation of a childhood fascination with crafting wooden models and miniature sculptures.
Much time in his formative years was spent in the workshops of his parent's antiques restoration firm, giving him a thorough informal education in the arts of craftsmanship.
That accumulated knowledge of flair and polish is on display in his three thoroughbreds, all equine power and elegance and his biggest public art project to date.
Inspired by the fact that this is the Chinese Year of the Horse, they were commissioned for New Year celebrations at the Gardens by the Bay nature park in Singapore, where they were even "ridden" by model jousters for a while.
(12) BY JAMES DORAN-WEBB (DRIFTWOOD SCULPTURES) - CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW 2014 http://t.co/Cqb6ea9dYh
— Janet Stewart (@tenajtiger) June 4, 2014
The logistics of creating each horse were daunting.
A metal frame provides the equivalent of the animal's skeleton, with hundreds of pieces of driftwood going into each sculpture.
The larger pieces are then bolted together and the bolts welded to the frame, with each smaller piece then painstakingly screwed into place.
"This wood has been dead for more than 50 years," Doran-Webb told CNN. "It has weathered over those decades, and that's what makes it look so fantastic.
"I was always an outdoor type of person, and would come across these wonderful pieces of wood while out kayaking -- I have been collecting driftwood since I was 18, and have enough stockpiled to be able to find, in the end, all the right pieces.
"I'll go on a hunt for a piece for a nostril or eyebrow, but I'll come across a potential hoof instead. It's like a jigsaw puzzle: you keep on looking until you've found the right piece.
"Also, people know the sort of wood I use now and they'll bring it to me," added Doran-Webb, who pays them, putting money into villages where incomes can often be precarious at best.
"But sometimes I'll think I've finished a piece and then find myself starting again with a certain amount of the wood because it doesn't look right. I focus hard on the details of faces and muscles."
His first use of driftwood, though, had nothing to do with animals or sculpture -- he had initially crafted and sold furniture from it until the possibilities of creating large-scale art suddenly struck him.
And what ambitious scale it is: each horse sculpture can weigh anything up to a ton (1,000 kilograms), is 16-17 hands (around 5ft 11ins) tall and can easily take the weight of a "jockey" or two.
Each takes three to four months to create, with Doran-Webb and his team of six craftsmen working together on the process, with each sculpture springing to life from a series of initial sketches and scale models.
"I'll have an idea -- an image of a horse race or a polo match -- and sketch it until I get something that has motion and movement," he said.
"The metal skeleton is crucial. If you stripped away the wood, what you would see would look sort of like the skeleton of the actual animal. It provides all the strength, but cladding it takes a long time."
It may take a long time, but Doran-Webb says he's never fully satisfied with the results, and only the world of deadlines prevents him from perpetual tinkering.
"If it wasn't for them, I'd never leave the studio," he admitted. "If something is even an inch out, you have to redo it. There's never been one I've been happy with first time."
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Great Historical Sites to Visit in and Around Charleston

If you are thinking of moving to the Lowcountry of South Carolina, you'll probably be thinking of Charleston or somewhere thereabouts. A place like Goose Creek, SC for instance, offers small town country living with all of the amenities and advantages of the city close by. And Isle of Palms is famous for its beaches and recreational opportunities. The whole area has a tremendous history, as well, with many settlements dating back to the late 17th century and plantations, churches, and other structures. Here are some of the top things to visit:

1.  Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum – This museum boasts some impressive crafts, for those interested in naval and military history. The aircraft carrier the USS YORKTOWN is housed here, along with a couple of the aircrafts that would have used it as a base during the Pacific Ocean Theater of WWII. It also offers the CLAMAGORE, a just post WWII submarine that was deployed for much of the Cold War. It holds the distinction of being the only intact Guppy III type of submarine left in the U.S.

 

(USS YORKTOWN)

 

2.  St. James' Church in Goose Creek – This tiny church was founded in 1714 by the Europeans who had come from Barbados to settle the area. The building is constructed of brick, stucco, and plaster, with a slate roof, and is considered one of the best examples of early religious architecture in the colonies. There is a small churchyard with historic graves on the property, as well. However, the church is active and the interior is only open to those who gain permission from the church wardens. Nonetheless, the building is a treat to see up close.

3.  Joseph Manigault House – This historic home is located right across the street from the Charleston Museum (and when you buy tickets for both together, they come at a discount). The house was built in 1803 for Joseph Manigault, a man of French Huguenot descent whose family had prospered in America as rice farmers. The house displays furnishings of American, French, and English make, all of which are of neoclassical design appropriate to the era. Some of these are original to the house, while others were bought to complete the museum collection (but all are authentic).

If you are considering moving to Charleston or an area near it like Goose Creek, SC, check out these great sites and the many others in the area. You'll realize why so many people are moving here. With this kind of cultural scene at your fingertips, weekends will never be boring.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Новости современных технологий на CreativeYP.com
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Indian Relay: 'Magical' racing in the mountains
By Matt Majendie, for CNN
updated 8:41 AM EDT, Mon July 21, 2014
Fast and frenetic, Indian Relay is a sport in which riders, including Jon Marc (pictured,) compete for pride and prize money, with no saddles or race helmets. Fast and frenetic, Indian Relay is a sport in which riders, including Jon Marc (pictured,) compete for pride and prize money, with no saddles or race helmets.
HIDE CAPTION
Indian Relay
<<
<
1 2 3 4 5
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Indian Relay is a fast-paced, high action sport reserved to the Rocky Mountain West
Little-known outside the tribes, it is arguably America's best kept sporting secret
Riders race without saddles and helmets in a frenetic relay involving man and beast
The sport is beginning to gain greater acclaim, with a documentary made about it
Follow us at @WorldSportCNN and like us on Facebook
(CNN) -- Indian Relay might just be America's best-kept sporting secret.
Little-known outside the tribes of the Rocky Mountains in the northwest, it's a "magical" mix of horse racing, track-and-field relay and the all-action adrenalin of rodeo.
Each race is battled out by up to six jockeys over three laps of a track -- and the riders have to change horses every lap.
With handlers for each horse, it creates a melee of 18 horses and 24 people. It is pure, unadulterated and unpredictable chaos.
To add a further twist, they don't use saddles or helmets, and the danger element adds to the "rock star" esteem in which the jockeys are held by their communities.
Kendall Old Horn has been involved in the sport for 37 years -- first as a rider back in 1978 and now as a team owner after returning after 21 years away, following a five-year stint in the Marine Corps.
"I don't know how to sell the sport but what I do know is that it's a fast-paced, high-action sport," he explains. "The adrenalin rush is the biggest buzz you can imagine.
 What California Chrome will see Rags to riches horse stuns racing world Sydney Autumn Carnival takes off globally?
"You can't beat that feeling, there's nothing like it. It's better than any high that you can experience, if you'd done anything like that. For me, it's America's best-kept secret as a sport."
Horses are a way of life for the Native American tribes of Montana, where Old Horn is based.
"I've been around horses from the day I hit the ground," he says. Horses are very therapeutic. They take away the everyday stresses of life.
"I was away from Indian Relay for 21 years but I was never away from horses. They're a part of me."
The Blackfoot Nation is a Native American territory in Montana.
Tribal elder Carol Murray admits Indian Relay is little known nationwide but describes the sport as "magical."
"It's the spirit of the animals and the spirit of the people coming together. But what amazes me is the effect it has on the spectators as well," explains Murray, whose son used to race and whose grandson is now entering the sport as a rider.
"You see the faces of the families watching and it's understandable how excited they are supporting their family members or their teams. But you look across the crowds at races and everyone's just so involved. It's a magical sport."
Murray has helped it gain slightly wider acclaim after being introduced to American filmmaker Charles Dye, who last year released a documentary called "Indian Relay." It takes an in-depth look at the sport and the characters within it, including Murray and Old Horn.
The project was a labor of love for Dye, who spent the first of the four years it took to complete trying to gain the trust of the communities -- no mean feat when there is a mistrust of outsiders.
Join us for Rocky Mountain Time! Aug. 2 @ 2pm #NMAINYC is showing 2 films, Before There Were Parks, and Indian Relay! pic.twitter.com/V9KIZyMWoT
— AmerIndianMuseumNYC (@AmerIndianNYC) July 16, 2014
But gradually Dye managed to get a true insight into the lives of those who eat, sleep and breathe the sport, in communities which are often very poor and where adult unemployment can be as high as 80%.
"Some of these are super-duper poor communities and in some cases without Indian Relay some of the young kids would fall into trouble," he says.
Dye had some prior knowledge of Indian Relay but admits his project became less about the sport and more about the people, the tribes and the communities it touches.
"You feel like you're falling off the edge of the world," says Dye, who followed teams from the Shoshone-Bannock Nation in Idaho and the Crow and Blackfoot Nations.
"You're in the wild west with no real connection to the rest of the world. It's quite magical. My film was not so much about horse racing, I guess, as the rural west."
 Top horses battle it out in Peru Family rivalry fuels royal horsing empire South African jockey shakes up racing
However, the film does capture the madness of the racing and the horse exchanges -- which occur with rider and animal moving at full pelt.
"These are top horses often at the ends of their career," Dye explains. "So they're obviously going at some speed.
"There's dangers but not as many people get hurt as you might think. I think the whole time I was there I saw one hospitalization and the guy was fine in the end."
Old Horn admits that "nobody went into this sport and didn't get hurt" but points out the injuries are relatively low because of the expertise of those involved.
"You need to have an incredibly high level of horsemanship both by the riders and those on the ground," he says. "We don't wear helmets and saddles as we're considered some of the best horse people on the face of the earth.
"If we wore those, we'd be a laughing stock. That's our pride and we take great pride in it."
Indian Relay is immersed in the middle of its season, with races virtually every weekend. Prize money is on offer but the amounts are relatively small, particularly given how far funds have to stretch among the team setup.
But Old Horn says it is not about the money: "It's about the pride, about the bragging rights when you win over the other tribes."
Murray echoes the overriding element of pride, but admits that watching her family members race at breakneck speed can be a harsh experience. Her faith in their horse-handling, however, makes it easier viewing.
"It is nerve wracking," she says. "I remember seeing my son Little Plume ride for the first time. He really wanted to ride but had to wait to get picked. I was in the stands and suddenly my friend was like, 'That's your son racing.'
"I thought no-one would pick him and so it was like, 'Oh my God.' So from there it's no turning back, I can't stop him. Horses have always been in my family -- it's part of my life, an extension of me.
"And it's so good. I remember how hard my son worked feeding, exercising the horses, doing everything that was required. It's a special thing."
Riders like Little Plume are "treated like rock stars," says Dye, but only to a local audience.
"The funny thing is that in the next-door town some people won't have even heard of it," he adds.
It truly is America's best-kept sporting secret.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Bode Miller: Ski star's horse racing dream
By Christina Macfarlane, CNN
updated 8:37 AM EDT, Thu October 30, 2014
Bode Miller, one of the world's most famous ski racers, is planning a career change. Bode Miller, one of the world's most famous ski racers, is planning a career change.
HIDE CAPTION
Bode Miller's equine ambitions
<<
<
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
>
>>
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
American skier Bode Miller is looking to start new career in horse racing
The 37-year-old is teaming up with Kentucky Derby winner Bob Baffert
Miller says he hopes to bring scientific approach to flat racing
His career on the slopes is in twilight years and he missed season opener
Follow us at @WorldSportCNN and like us on Facebook
(CNN) -- He's won six Olympic medals on two legs, but Bode Miller's future will ride on four.
One of the finest skiers of all time, the American's obsessive attention to detail has paid dividends during his mercurial career on the slopes.
Now, as the 37-year-old enters the autumn of his alpine skiing days, Miller hopes to transfer his meticulous approach to training racehorses.
He is convinced that technology is key to equine success, and he aims to take his flair for innovation from the piste to the racetrack.
"I'm one of the people who sees it really clearly because I'm in a different sport that uses all that stuff," Miller told CNN at last weekend's World Cup ski opener in Solden, Austria.
"The people in horse racing don't see it at all. They think it's crazy, they think it's like voodoo and magic, and for us it's just normal stuff."
Watch this video
In Miller's experience, success can be achieved by the smallest of margins.
Winless for two years and dogged by injury, it was a heart-in-mouth moment when he roared down the mountain at February's Sochi Winter Games in a final attempt to add to his Olympic medal tally.
"I've always been very scientific in my approach -- in Sochi I changed from using a rubber goggle strap to a plastic strap because research showed it would save me one-hundredth of a second," he explained at the premier of a new documentary "Quest for the Future," about life after skiing.
"I took bronze by one-hundredth of a second!"
Miller's "leave-no-stone-unturned" attitude has served him well.
He was famously one of the first athletes to break away from the U.S. ski team -- and be successful.
In addition to his Olympic haul, Miller boasts five world championship medals, 33 World Cup victories and two overall titles to boot.

And, although he enters horse racing as something of a novice, Miller is confident that a modern approach could reap rich rewards.
"Twenty-five years ago, ski racing equipment was archaic. I came in and said, 'Let's build shape skis' and a bunch of other changes, and the sport changed really dramatically and allowed me to be on the front end of it for a long time," he says.
 Taking horse racing out of the box Smooth running on Ascot race day
"Twenty years ago horse racing was the same, but now it's in a perfect place where sport and technology can be put together. It's all invented already, but you just have to apply it in the right way."
It's not the first time Miller's attention has been drawn away from ski racing.
In 2010, following an invitation from the United States Tennis Association, Miller tried and failed to qualify for the U.S. Open, losing his opening match at the sectional playoffs.
But his passion for flat racing has been bubbling under the surface for some time.
Ever since becoming a small-portion owner in a racehorse 10 years ago, Miller has slowly developed his knowledge and expertise to the level that he can now realize his ambition of a full-time career in the sport.
And it's clear the high-stakes nature of racing appeals to his basic instincts.
"The horses perform at their highest level -- they're trying with everything they have," Miller says.
Steep N Deep. Icy Ride. And my girls own London Mae. Wish I still had Carving. "@bryce_koch: @MillerBode how many horses do you have ?"
— Bode Miller (@MillerBode) September 9, 2014
"I think coming from ski racing I can appreciate that. Losing by just a nose, or a whisker," he smiles, "it's tough."
As with everything Miller commits himself to, only "the best" will do.
"It really has a lot of the critical components of things that I love in my life," he continues. "To set that on top of the challenge of figuring out an industry and becoming the best in the world at something ... It's just the icing on the cake."
 Winning the Prix de L'Arc de Triomphe Training with Avenir Certain
But this time he won't be going it alone.
Helping him out of the starting gate is one of the best trainers in the business, Bob Baffert, who appears to provide the "Yin" to Miller's "Yang."
"For me he's a great example of how to balance out expert horsemanship -- which he has -- with sports science and technology, which is what I have," Miller says of his new partner.
And with three Kentucky Derby wins under his belt, Baffert also brings a wealth of knowledge of what it takes to win America's preeminent flat racing event -- a long-held ambition for Miller.
"When people talk about a horse race, that's the one they talk about," he says. "It's the biggest showpiece, it has the same prestige in the sport the same way Kitzbuhel does in ski racing. It's a very challenging race to win."
So what of his skiing career?
Miller fueled speculation that he would compete at the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang after signing a four-year contract with helmet manufacturer Dainese.
But he was quick to dismiss the rumor on Twitter, citing his already advanced years for a top skier.
Ya'll are crazy if you think I'm skiing 4 more years. I was old 10 years ago.
— Bode Miller (@MillerBode) September 19, 2014
At this stage of the game, health has become a real consideration for Miller.
On Sunday he withdrew from the 2014-15 season's first World Cup event in Solden with an ongoing back injury -- a sign that he's no longer willing to put his body on the line.
"If it was golf then, you know, maybe I could lag on for another couple of years and keep competing because there's no real harm in it," he admits.
"In skiing, if you make the wrong mistake or you're not fully prepared, you can kill yourself.
"If I'm not in peak form or putting in all the work you need to be prepared and safe, then I'll pull away from the sport."
The high-octane world of flat racing holds no such risks for Miller, only tantalizing rewards.
And as he moves into his twilight years on the snow, this workhorse has a feeling the turf will suit him just fine.
"I can stay focused on something indefinitely for as long as it needs to happen, and I love that horses are the same way," he says.
"When you put a horse to task they do what you ask them to every time, so building a scenario which helps them to peak at the right time is really appealing to me. It's exactly what we do in ski racing."
Photo
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded