Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Almost Black
4 followers -
Almost Black: The True Story of How I Got into Medical School by Pretending to Be Black
Almost Black: The True Story of How I Got into Medical School by Pretending to Be Black

4 followers
About
Almost Black's posts

Wake up! If you think you're not good enough for X, Y, or Z school.
But Sander and Heriot pointed out that universities go to great lengths not to give students an informed choice, actively concealing the failure rate of students who enter with lower grades and test scores. Both said they would embrace a compromise to avoid the trench warfare of political battle over the issue and would drop all objections to affirmative action if universities gave every student the career-goal success rate of prior students with their credentials at that school. Sander said the pretense universities perpetuate, that everyone they admit has the same chance of success, is “manifestly untrue.”

Post has attachment
It is that time of the year again...
Photo

Post has attachment
#tbt #wheniwasblack

While driving my dad's Toyota 4Runner, got pulled over, the first thing the cop asked me was "how expensive is your car?"

Image Credit: Flickr Chris Bodine
Photo

Post has attachment
Almost Black is the story of a hard-partying college frat boy who discovers the seriousness and complexity of America’s racial problems while posing as a black man.
I came to see the racial preferences of affirmative action as just another form of racial discrimination. One of my motivations for writing this story was to shine a light on the type of racial favoritism I experienced, a form of “affirmative action discrimination.”
I hope this book will become some small catalyst for social change, or at the very least cause readers to ask critical questions about race relations.
Photo

Post has attachment
Being a black man back then was a stomach churning eye opener.

What shocked me was how I was frequently treated with an enormous lack of respect, disdain, and suspicion by many, from police officers to admissions officers, store clerks, women who didn't like black mojo, people on the street, and even fellow college students.

As a student of history, and as my journey as a black man progressed, it eventually brought the issue of racism into very personal and sharp relief as I experienced the schism between blacks and whites.



Image Credit: Flickr Daviniodus
Photo

Post has attachment
I discovered that being a black man had some fairly interesting upsides -- other than giving me a leg up with medical schools, was that suddenly women SAW me.

Not in the profound Návi way, but in the "I wanna bang you. NOW," way. As a black man I somehow fell heir to a powerful (but thoroughly enjoyable) sexual magnetism that was just as tangible and puzzling to all of my Indian American friends as it was to me.

Image Credit: Flickr Joe. D Photography
Photo

Post has attachment
My scheme worked like a charm.
Despite my shabby 31 MCAT score, I managed to con some of the finest medical schools in the United States such as Harvard, the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Washington University, Case Western Reserve, and Mount Sinai to sniff me over and take me seriously.
Here is my acceptance letter from St.Louis University, and you can check out invitations sent from these prestigious universities in my album.
Photo

Post has attachment
While most kids dream of being pilots or firemen or superheroes, Indian kids dream of becoming doctors.

So with a college GPA of 3.14 and the possibility of actually becoming a doctor seeming destined to fade into the dreams of youth, my desperation forced me to put all options on the table (after kissing any ethical standards goodbye).

I knew that admission standards under affirmative action were, let's say... less stringent. I also watched Indian American friends with better records apply for med school and what did they get?

Zip. Zero. Nada.

I saw the pain in their eyes and despair in their voices as rejection after rejection crushed the life out of their medical dreams. Terrified of the same fate I frantically looked for anything within reason to avoid it. I soon reasoned that something unreasonable was required.

That's when it hit me. It was audacious. It was politically incorrect. Sketchy at best, criminal at worst... I had to do it.

I had to become a black man.



Image Credit: Oxfam on Flickr
Photo

Post has attachment
Almost Black is the story of a hard-partying college frat boy who discovers the seriousness and complexity of America’s racial problems while posing as a black man.
I came to see the racial preferences of affirmative action as just another form of racial discrimination. One of my motivations for writing this story was to shine a light on the type of racial favoritism I experienced, a form of “affirmative action discrimination.”
I hope this book will become some small catalyst for social change, or at the very least cause readers to ask critical questions about race relations.
Photo

Post has attachment
Let's make one thing clear: am I a criminal? No.
I was twenty-one when I pulled this scam.

At twenty-one not only do you know everything but your balls are titanium and hubris crushes common sense. Add soul-sucking fear as a wonderful motivator.
Photo
Wait while more posts are being loaded