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firstwriter.com
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firstwriter.com is a writers' resource site, including databases of literary agents, book publishers, writing contests, magazines, and more.
firstwriter.com is a writers' resource site, including databases of literary agents, book publishers, writing contests, magazines, and more.

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New Publisher Listing
Publishes: Fiction; Nonfiction; Poetry;
Areas include: Adventure; Biography; Crime; Fantasy; Historical; Nature; Politics; Romance; Science; Sci-Fi; Self-Help; Thrillers;
Markets: Children's; Youth;
Preferred styles: Commercial; Contemporary; Literary; Mainstream

Accepts submissions for science fiction and fantasy direct from authors. Submissions in all other areas must come via a literary agent.

https://www.firstwriter.com/publishers/details.cgi?RecordNumber=2418
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New Literary Agency Listing
Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction
Areas: Autobiography; Biography; Business; Culture; Current Affairs; Health; Historical; Lifestyle; Psychology; Sociology; Sport; Technology; Women's Interests
Markets: Adult
Treatments: Literary

Send query by email only. Include "QUERY" in the subject line, and a one-page query letter, which identifies the category of your work, the title, the word count, and provides a brief overview of your project, credentials and previous publishing history, if any. Complete book proposals on request only.

https://www.firstwriter.com/Agents/details.cgi?RecordNumber=1230
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New Magazine Listing
Publishes: Essays; Interviews; Nonfiction; Poetry; Reviews;
Areas include: Literature;
Markets: Adult;
Preferred styles: Contemporary; Literary

Publishes poetry and literary prose. No previously published material. Send up to five poems or a piece of prose via online submission system ($3 charge) or by post with SASE. Accepts simultaneous submissions if notice of acceptance elsewhere is given. Six month response time.

https://www.firstwriter.com/magazines/details.cgi?RecordNumber=2603
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Kaplan Stahler Agency Names Cindy Mintz Head of TV Literary
Kaplan Stahler’s Cindy Mintz has been named head of TV Literary at the boutique agency. In her new role, Mintz will oversee a department of five agents.

Mintz joined Kaplan Stahler in 2013 after a brief stint at Abrams Artists Agency, where she was instrumental in launching their TV literary department. Prior to Abrams, she spent 15 years as a TV packaging agent at ICM Partners.

https://deadline.com/2018/09/kaplan-stahler-agency-cindy-mintz-head-of-tv-literary-1202464446/
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Meet the upstart publishers taking a chance on print
Please use the sharing tools found via the share button at the top or side of articles. Copying articles to share with others is a breach of FT.com T&Cs and Copyright Policy. Email licensing@ft.com to buy additional rights. Subscribers may share up to 10 or 20 articles per month using the gift article service. More information can be found here.
https://www.ft.com/content/c151b846-7b8d-11e8-af48-190d103e32a4

Walk into the newsagent in London’s upmarket Selfridges department store or the bookshop at the Tate Modern art gallery, and you will find row after row of independent consumer magazines, often with hefty cover prices. As traditional print magazines battle with declining advertising revenues and struggle with the rise of digital publishing, a shift is happening in the niche independent publishing sector. From The Gourmand, a journal about food and culture, to The Jackal, a men’s luxury lifestyle magazine, a raft of start-ups are venturing into print.

https://www.ft.com/content/c151b846-7b8d-11e8-af48-190d103e32a4
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Penguin Random House Is Building the Perfect Publishing House
When Penguin and Random House announced in the fall of 2012 that they intended to merge, Hurricane Sandy was barreling toward New York City, America’s publishing capital. It was an instant metaphor for headline writers: “As Sandy Loomed, the Publishing Industry Panicked.” People inside both companies worried about their jobs; people outside the companies worried about the market power of a new conglomerate comprised of the country’s two largest trade publishers. Agents and authors, meanwhile, worried that the consolidation would further drive down advances.

Random House’s top brass insisted that there was no need to panic. “The continuity will far outweigh the change,” Markus Dohle, the CEO of what would become Penguin Random House, told The New York Times when the merger was completed the following summer. “We have the luxury to take the time before we make any strategic decisions. There is no need to rush.”

https://newrepublic.com/article/151177/penguin-random-house-building-perfect-publishing-house
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New Literary Agency Listing
Handles: Fiction; Nonfiction
Areas: Autobiography; Biography; Crime; Culture; Current Affairs; Entertainment; Erotic; Fantasy; Film; Horror; Humour; Music; Mystery; Sci-Fi; Suspense; Thrillers
Markets: Adult; Youth
Treatments: Commercial; Contemporary; Dark; Literary; Mainstream; Popular; Positive; Progressive; Satirical; Serious; Traditional

Currently selling a lot of nonfiction books but more focused on finding commercial novels now. Seeking ambitious epic books with attractive characters to lend themselves for movie adaptations. Think big! Check out the detailed Q&A with me on my agency Facebook site as it will give you a lot of info about why I might be the right agent for you.

https://www.firstwriter.com/Agents/details.cgi?RecordNumber=1229
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Scottish crime author Val McDermid got into writing for the money – and reveals why she loves ‘books with dead bodies’
AUTHOR Val McDermid remembers the exact moment she knew she’d be a writer — when she read in a kids’ story that you could get PAID to pen books.

Award-winning Val, who has sold more than 40 million of her crime novels, said it was the popular Chalet School stories that sparked her future career.

She said: “The moment of realisation came for me when I was nine years old.

“I used to read the Chalet Girls books and one of the characters grew up to become a writer.

“I remember distinctly reading it — it was on a right-hand page about halfway down, about her getting a cheque from her publisher.

“I thought, ‘Oh my god, you can get paid money for this?’ I don’t know if I thought people maybe just wrote out of the goodness of their heart and the books arrived on the shelves.

“But I thought I could do that, I could tell stories and lies, and I could get paid money for it.

“From then, when people asked what I was going to do when I grew up I said a writer and people would laugh, people from my background didn’t do that.”

https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/fabulous/3189956/crime-val-mcdermid-money-dead-bodies-books-schools/
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E-book pricing: because you’re worth it
You’re a self-published author. You’re digitally publishing and you are responsible for pricing your e-book. How do you decide the price?

There are two schools of thought in the interminable self-publishing pricing discussion. One believes firmly in the pile ’em high and sell ’em cheap philosophy. The other side holds that to be a horrible undervaluation of our talents and time.

I’m firmly in the second camp. I’ve long been of the opinion that self-published authors selling at “remaindered bin” prices are doing themselves, and self-publishing authors generally, a huge disservice. They’re not valuing their own work sufficiently highly, and they’re encouraging readers to place less value on independently published work than traditionally published. They’re saying, “my book is not as good as one you would find in a bookshop, so I can’t charge as much for it. The only way I can encourage you to buy it is if I either give it away free, or charge what a bookshop would charge for books that nobody wants (the ‘remaindered bin’)”.

Why has that become an accepted tactic?

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/e-book-pricing-because-you-re-worth-it-1.3620532
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Folio Literary Management Acquires Harold Ober Associates
Folio Literary Management has acquired Harold Ober Associates, a full-service literary agency founded in 1929 that has represented some of the literary titans of the 20th century, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Agatha Christie and J.D. Salinger.

President of Harold Ober Associates, Phyllis Westberg, said the merger is "a perfect pairing of the traditional and the new." And Jeff Kleinman, a founding partner at Folio, said the acquisition brings his firm "the legacy of an eminent institution in the history of American publishing."

https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/book-deals/article/77918-folio-literary-management-acquires-harold-ober-associates.html
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