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Dec Kelly
As seen[citation needed] on Wikipedia.[citation needed]
As seen[citation needed] on Wikipedia.[citation needed]
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New album from PraxisCat.
Here is my new PraxisCat album. It is what I have spent much of my time on for the last several months. It is chaotic, bizarre, and sometimes beautiful. 

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Released today on all major digital platforms...and on download and CD from our official bandcamp store!
https://twogods.bandcamp.com/album/tunes

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(not new)

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Looking for a farming job in Ireland?

"Lad wanted to help around dairy/beef farm – power washing, cleaning up shite, experience slurry spreading a bonus not essential, feeding calves, bedding etc. May suit student as hours casual."

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Ann Lovett
RIP
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An acceptable answer.
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This awesome periodic table shows the origins of every atom in your body

Here’s something to think about: the average adult human is made up of 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (7 octillion) atoms, and most of them are hydrogen - the most common element in the Universe, produced by the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago.

The rest of those atoms were forged by ancient stars merging and exploding billions of years after the formation of the Universe, and a tiny amount can be attributed to cosmic rays - high-energy radiation that mostly originates from somewhere outside the Solar System.

To give you a better idea of where the ingredients for every living human came from, Jennifer A. Johnson, an astronomer at the Ohio State University, put together this new periodic table that breaks down all the elements according to their origin.

To keep things relevant for the human body, Johnson explains that she cut a number of elements from the bottom section.

"Tc, Pm, and the elements beyond U do not have long-lived or stable isotopes. I have ignored the elements beyond U in this plot, but not including Tc and Pm looked weird, so I have included them in grey," Johnson explains on her blog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

The new periodic table builds on work Johnson and her colleague, astronomer Inese Ivans from the University of Utah, did back in 2008 - a project born out of equal measures of frustration and procrastination.

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Showing some adaptability:
"quickly withdrew its letter after realizing that CNN is a client and threatening its own client presented a conflict."
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