Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)
364,113 followers -
Discovery in Action
Discovery in Action

364,113 followers
About
Posts

An organic molecule used in dyes and antibiotics may be the key to less expensive, more efficient redox flow batteries. Scientists PNNL have developed a highly reversible, water soluble material based on phenazine. The compound could serve as an alternative to vanadium, which is used in grid-scale batteries to store electricity. [url]
Add a comment...

We had the pleasure of listening to Dr. Art McDonald, winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics and Professor Emeritus from Queen’s University in Canada, give a lecture on “Neutrinos, Dark Matter and the Nature of the Universe” yesterday. What a privilege! #nobelprize #physics
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
We’re excited to welcome Dr. Art McDonald, winner of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics and Professor Emeritus from Queen’s University in Canada, to PNNL tomorrow. Dr. McDonald will be giving a lecture for PNNL staff at 3:30pm in Battelle Auditorium. #nobelprize #physics
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
The work of two PNNL researchers was recently recognized by The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine as among the Academies' most popular of the past year.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Getting lighting systems to play well with others: PNNL research shows that #connected lighting systems show promise, but interoperability challenges must be addressed. https://buff.ly/2FOHIMw
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Currently, industry uses a common but expensive process called cryogenic distillation to separate xenon from other gases or the atmosphere. In that costly process, a lot of energy is used to chill entire gas streams down to far below freezing in order to concentrate the xenon.

"The process we've demonstrated to selectively trap xenon in a MOF can be done at room temperature," said Praveen Thallapally a materials scientist at PNNL and a corresponding author on the paper. "You pass a mixed gas stream over the MOF materials just one time to capture the xenon and it can be stored long term and easily released for industrial applications when you want to use it."

Researchers at PNNL, in collaboration with other research groups, optimized the properties of a MOF material called SBMOF-1 and demonstrated that it selectively traps xenon and, in a second pass, can also trap krypton, both of which are byproducts of nuclear reprocessing. Much of this research is funded by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy to explore technologies that may one day enable safe, efficient recycling of nuclear fuel. https://buff.ly/2BFmLjF
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
With some back-of-the-envelope calculations, Eric Wiedner and his colleagues at #PNNL predicted that a cobalt catalyst could take a different reaction path to work in water with inexpensive sodium bicarbonate (baking soda). The result? It’s the best-performing nonprecious metal catalyst for converting carbon dioxide in water. Learn more at https://goo.gl/5uPWMC.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A new study, published today in Science, capitalized on data from an area of the Amazon that is pristine except for the region around Manaus, the largest city in the Amazon, with a population of more than 2 million people. The setting gave scientists the rare opportunity to look at the impact of pollution on atmospheric processes in a largely pre-industrial environment and pinpoint the effects of the particles apart from other factors such as temperature and humidity.
In this study, scientists studied the role of ultrafine particles less than 50 nanometers wide in the development of thunderstorms. Similar but larger particles are known to play a role in feeding powerful, fast-moving updrafts of air from the land surface to the atmosphere, creating the clouds that play a central role in the formation of water droplets that fall as rain.
But scientists had not observed – until now – that smaller particles below 50 nanometers, such as particles produced by vehicles and industrial processes, could do the same.https://buff.ly/2E7NFU2
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Researchers can use Xanthos to examine the implications of different climate, socioeconomic, and/or energy scenarios over the 21st century. They can then assess the effects of the scenarios on regional and global water availability. Xanthos can be used in three different ways. It can operate as an independent hydrologic model, driven, for example, by scenarios. It can serve as the core freshwater supply component of the Global Change Assessment Model, where multiple sectors and natural systems are modeled simultaneously as part of an interconnected, complex system. Further, it can be used by other integrated models and multi-model frameworks that focus on energy-water-land interactions.

Read more at: https://buff.ly/2FWtMjh
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
"Jansson also says it may be possible to piece together the entire genetic sequence of these microbes, so that even if you can't grow the microbes in a lab, scientists may be able to figure out what they're doing just from looking at their genes."
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded