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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)
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Discovery in Action
Discovery in Action

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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)'s posts

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At the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, scientific user facility at PNNL, there now exists an unprecedented ability to routinely analyze large intact proteins, precisely measure the fine structure of isotopes, and extract more information from complex natural organic matter mixtures. All this, thanks to one of the world’s most powerful mass spectrometry instruments. Read more at https://goo.gl/wNvRw0.
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To better drive industrial reactions and store energy, scientists often start with microscopic particles with tiny pore channels. Because defects between particles can hamper performance, a PNNL research team created a “one-pot” method that produces tiny, complex and well-structured pyramids. This approach offers control over 3D material growth similar to that seen in nature – a vital benchmark for synthesis. Read more at https://goo.gl/d3rJlI.
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The next edition of PNNL Currents is coming out soon. Subscribe now for science news and opportunities: https://goo.gl/SGRYKi.
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For the past seven years, a team of PNNL scientists studied vital catalytic reactions, such as those needed for longer lasting batteries. In recognition of their achievements using a technique called “ion soft landing,” PNNL scientists Julia Laskin, Grant Johnson and Venkateshkumar "Venky" Prabhakaran were invited to share their perspectives in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C. This invited feature article explores understanding catalysis and energy storage processes at the molecular level. Read more at https://goo.gl/hFnxFC.
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ACS President and PNNL Associate Laboratory Director Allison Campbell authored a recent C&EN cover story. Her article – “Pedaling the Power of Chemistry” – focuses on the importance for chemists to tell their stories to the broader public and to better inform decision makers. Check it out at https://goo.gl/xrXFaS.
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Statement from Rep. Dan Newhouse: "With my colleagues on both sides of the aisle, I pledged this week to work with President Trump to support Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. PNNL is a major economic driver in the State of Washington and throughout the Pacific Northwest, and with a staff of 4,300 it is one of the largest employers in Central and Eastern Washington."

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One source of energy that covers nearly 100 percent of the world is wind. According the +U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind Vision Report (https://goo.gl/VJCJP6), wind can be a viable source of renewable electricity in all 50 states by 2050. However, to truly be environmentally friendly, wind energy must address the issue of wildlife interactions. Now, a PNNL-developed website called Tethys is supporting a growing community of researchers, regulators and developers in the areas of wind and marine energy. It includes WREN Hub, a searchable database of white papers and scientific reports about wind energy and wildlife. Read more at https://goo.gl/ex9gpN.
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Congratulations to Jenny Yang, a former PNNL postdoc and scientific alum of PNNL’s Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis. Now at the University of California-Irvine, Yang was recently named an award recipient of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). At PNNL, we are proud to see our scientists move on and make the world a better place! Read more at https://goo.gl/SNMa1T.
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The chemical bonds in hydrogen gas could power fuel cells, internal combustion engines, generators, and much more. Drawing upon bacteria as inspiration, scientists developed a nickel-based catalyst that produces 45 million hydrogen molecules per second. Researchers learned the key to speeding the rate of reaction was making certain parts of the catalyst move more slowly. Learn more at https://goo.gl/KrCGna.
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Our national security depends on developing better ways to detect nuclear explosions with increased sensitivity. At PNNL, researchers are advancing the science and technologies to meet this challenge. They work with colleagues around the world to deploy technologies to ensure that we can detect and characterize suspicious events. In his monthly column, PNNL Director Dr. Steven Ashby discusses PNNL’s important work in this area. Read more at https://goo.gl/8wa0mL.
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