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Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)
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How clouds form and how they help set the temperature of the earth are two of the big remaining questions in climate research. Now, a study of clouds over the world's remotest ocean shows that ocean life is responsible for up to half the cloud droplets that pop in and out of existence during summer. Read more about this new research at http://www.pnnl.gov/news/release.aspx?id=4212.
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A new study shows where Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau soot pollution comes from. Warming the region enough to melt snow earlier and shrink glaciers, the soot can impact water for millions in Asia. The research can help policy makers target the most effective pollution reduction efforts. Read more at http://www.pnnl.gov/news/release.aspx?id=4215. 
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Each year, R&D Magazine honors the 100 most innovative scientific and technological breakthroughs. PNNL has six finalists this year. The winners will be announced in November. Today, we profile the second PNNL finalist: Pressurized Magic Angle Spinning (PMAS) Technology for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy. This technology solves intractable problems that previously prevented NMR spectroscopy from analyzing samples under pressure. This new technology opens the door to an entirely new range of NMR studies, including determining approaches for carbon sequestration, creating solid-state catalysts, developing new materials for pressurized environments, and optimizing food industry processes. The development team includes PNNL’s David Hoyt, Jian Zhi Hu, Kevin Rosso, Jesse Sears, Eric Walter, Hardeep Mehta, and former PNNL researcher R.V. Flaviu Turcu.
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With their warm, waterlogged soils, rice paddies contribute up to 17 percent of global methane emissions, the equivalent of about 100 million tons each year. With the addition of a single gene, rice can be cultivated to emit virtually no methane from its paddies during growth. Read more at http://www.pnnl.gov/news/release.aspx?id=4214.
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A recent study using resources and expertise at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at PNNL, revealed a predominant pathway of phosphorus cycling in the mid-Chesapeake Bay could be useful for developing strategies to enhance water quality in this vital fishery ecosystem. The research team also included scientists from University of Delaware and Old Dominion University. Read more at http://www.emsl.pnnl.gov/emslweb/news/coastal-contamination.
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Three PNNL scientists have been selected to join the Washington State Academy of Sciences. Jim De Yoreo, Janet Jansson and Yong Wang will join other scientists and engineers from across the state being recognized for outstanding scientific achievement and leadership. Academy members provide expert scientific and engineering analysis to inform public policy-making, and work to increase the role and visibility of science in Washington state. Read more at http://www.pnnl.gov/news/release.aspx?id=4213.
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When aluminum atoms bunch up, porous materials called zeolites lose their ability to convert oil to gasoline. An international team, including scientists at PNNL, created the first 3-D atomic map of a zeolite to find out how to improve catalysts used to produce fuel, biofuel and other chemicals. Read more about this exciting research at http://www.pnnl.gov/news/release.aspx?id=4209.
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Means no fractional distillation? Just kidding.
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Each year, R&D Magazine honors the 100 most innovative scientific and technological breakthroughs. PNNL has six finalists this year. The winners will be announced in November. The third PNNL finalist, CHAMPION (Columnar Hierarchical Auto-associative Memory Processing in Ontological Networks), is an advanced reasoning software system that, combining subject matter expertise, cyber analyst knowledge and historical data, enables threat detection in near-real-time. This is a feat that no other cyber threat software has accomplished. The development team includes PNNL’s Shawn Hampton, Rick Berg, Katya Pomiak, and Patrick Paulson; Champion Technology Company Inc.’s Ryan Hohimer, Alex Gibson, and Peter Neorr; and former PNNL staff member Frank Greitzer.
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Accurately forecasting future electricity needs is tricky, with sudden weather changes and other variables impacting projections minute by minute. Errors can have grave repercussions, from blackouts to high market costs. Now, PNNL researchers have developed a new forecasting tool that delivers up to a 50 percent increase in accuracy and the potential to save millions in wasted energy costs. Read more at http://www.pnnl.gov/news/release.aspx?id=4216.
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Flywheels can help manage volatility in load demand; so I have read.
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When aluminum atoms bunch up, porous materials called zeolites lose their ability to convert oil to gasoline. An international team, including scientists at PNNL, created the first 3-D atomic map of a zeolite to find out how to improve catalysts used to produce fuel, biofuel and other chemicals. Read more about this exciting research at http://www.pnnl.gov/news/release.aspx?id=4209.
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Each year, R&D Magazine honors the 100 most innovative scientific and technological breakthroughs. PNNL has six finalists this year. The winners will be announced in November. Today, let’s take a look at the first PNNL finalist: Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray (SPIN) Source. This technology turns liquid samples into gas-phase ions to be analyzed by mass spectrometry – with 50 times more efficiency – dramatically increasing result accuracy. It converts around 50 percent of sample molecules and directs them to the mass spectrometer, compared to less than 1 percent for other electrospray ion sources. And with this technology, scientists can perform studies never before possible – potentially leading to breakthroughs in genetic engineering and diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The development team includes PNNL’s Keqi Tang, Ryan Kelly, Richard D. Smith and Gordon Anderson; Randall Pedder of Ardara Technologies, LP, who licensed the technology; and former PNNL staff members Jason Page, Ioan Marginean, and Jonathan Cox.
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Cool
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PNNL scientists have solved a difficult problem for research: Why do certain catalytic reactions simply not happen as calculated? The research team used three prototypical reactions on a titanium dioxide surface and demonstrated that reactions will happen only with additional energy, such as heat or light. By looking at the excited states along the reaction, the team saw a cusp on the lowest energy pathway, indicating the reaction can happen only after the system is excited to a higher energy state. This study will help scientists accurately model catalytic reactions on titania and other reducible oxides that are frequently used in industry. Read more at http://www.pnnl.gov/science/highlights/highlight.asp?id=4040.
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1-888-375-PNNL (7665)
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902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99352
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At Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, scientists and engineers are transforming the world through courageous discovery and innovation.
Introduction
Who we are: PNNL is a U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory where interdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers address many of America’s most pressing challenges in energy, the environment, and national security through advances in basic and applied science.

Mission: "We transform the world through courageous discovery and innovation."

Description: PNNL’s main campus is in Richland, Wash., where the majority of the Laboratory’s 4,300 staff work under an annual operating budget of about $936 million. PNNL science & technology is strategically focused on inspiring and enabling the world to live prosperously, safely, and securely.

PNNL is acknowledged as having 10 core capabilities, ranging from the basic to applied sciences. They are:
  • Chemical and molecular sciences
  • Chemical engineering
  • Biological systems science
  • Climate change science
  • Environmental subsurface science
  • Applied materials science and engineering
  • Applied nuclear science and technology
  • Advanced computer science, visualization, and data
  • Systems engineering and integration, and
  • Large-scale user facilities and advanced instrumentation 

Each capability is a powerful combination of:
  • World-class technical staff
  • State-of-the-art equipment, and
  • Mission-ready facilities
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