Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Deca Stories
8 followers
8 followers
About
Deca's posts

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Deca's +Sonia Faleiro in +Foreign Policy discussing the lynching of an alleged rape victim in Nagaland, India. http://foreignpolicy.com/2015/03/20/the-lynching-of-syed-sarifuddin-khan/

Post has attachment
Photo

Post has attachment
13 Men is out this Thursday! http://www.decastories.com/13men/
Photo

Post has shared content
Wherever you are in the world, you can pre-order Deca #5 today: http://www.decastories.com/13men/ 
An excerpt from my Deca single, "13 MEN", in this weekend's Lounge newspaper. 

Post has attachment
Deca presents book #5, Sonia Faleiro's investigation into a high profile gang rape in India. "13 Men" is out February 26, but you can preorder your copy today! http://www.decastories.com/13men/

Post has attachment
In 25 minutes!
Watch Tom Zoellner in conversation with Marc Herman on Dark Tourism: http://bit.ly/1CQQipE 
10 am PST, live on Google Hangouts.

Post has shared content
In a remote corner of the Bolivian Andes, the legendary Potosí silver mine has stood as a beacon for the greedy, the ruthless, and the desperate since the time of the conquistadors. But when journalist Tom Zoellner ventures into the mountain’s stifling tunnels, he finds himself surrounded by Scandinavians on holiday, taking selfies in the dust.

Zoellner realizes that the silver mine has become a tourist attraction, an underground anti-amusement park where hundreds of people die every year in explosions and cave ins. Welcome to the bizarre industry of “Dark Ecotourism.”

"Come See the Mountain" is not just a veteran reporter’s frontline portrait of daily life in a Bolivian silver mine, but a journey into the guilty heart of progress. How can places like Potosí continue to exist in the 21st century? And what drives people—us—to visit them?

Post has attachment
In a remote corner of the Bolivian Andes, the legendary Potosí silver mine has stood as a beacon for the greedy, the ruthless, and the desperate since the time of the conquistadors. But when journalist Tom Zoellner ventures into the mountain’s stifling tunnels, he finds himself surrounded by Scandinavians on holiday, taking selfies in the dust.

Zoellner realizes that the silver mine has become a tourist attraction, an underground anti-amusement park where hundreds of people die every year in explosions and cave ins. Welcome to the bizarre industry of “Dark Ecotourism.”

"Come See the Mountain" is not just a veteran reporter’s frontline portrait of daily life in a Bolivian silver mine, but a journey into the guilty heart of progress. How can places like Potosí continue to exist in the 21st century? And what drives people—us—to visit them?
Wait while more posts are being loaded