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Billy Lloyd
40 followers -
Tableware designer based in London.
Tableware designer based in London.

40 followers
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I have recently returned from Ambiente in Frankfurt where I launched a new tableware range with Monno Ceramic, a Bangladesh ceramics manufacturer. Over the years, Monno have developed numerous collections with notable designers such as Queensberry Hunt and you’ll find a lot of their bone china in John Lewis or Crate and Barrel, for example. My range, ‘William’, is made in fine china and has a warm creamy hue to it. These plates all have the same size rim, which has a slight concave curve to follow the form of ones thumb, making it comfortable to pick up. The collection was thankfully very well received and we are all delighted. Over the course of this year we will be extending the range as well as working on another, both for Ambiente ‘19. Thank you to the whole Monno family for your enthusiasm to encouragement to realise a young(ish) designer’s ambitions.
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Earlier this year, I had the pleasure of collaborating with the fabulous interior designer Heloise O Hagan to design and develop a range of bone china candleholders. They were made, in my London studio, to a very fine dimension of approximately 1.5mm thin and are beautifully translucent as a result. This is echoed by the soft unglazed interior and exterior, which adds a luxurious feel to the votives. Once the candle has expired, the vessel can be cleaned and repurposed in a number of ways.

We settled on a hexagonal form because Heloise's HOH logo is framed within a hexagon and can in fact be seen embossed into the underside of each piece, as seen in the photograph below.

Available in one of five thoughtfully curated scents, the candleholders can be purchased via Heloise's online store (http://bit.ly/HEXHOH) and are rather gorgeous, even if I do say do myself!

Another very enjoyable collaboration.
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Amongst various other pieces, these lidded jar prototypes are the result of my investigation into #BarroRojo (red clay) during my British Council Design Residency in Oaxaca and have scorched pine lids, which I commissioned a local carpenter to make. We call this shape 'pansa', which means belly in Spanish. When developing shapes with the potters, they would often ask "más pansa?" This means 'more belly?' So we decided the collection should consist of a variety of curved forms in response to this.
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Very pleased to announce that I have been selected for a British Council Residency in Oaxaca, Mexico. Annie Warburton, Creative Director of the Crafts Council, kindly nominated me for application, which of course I duly accepted. Thankfully, the panel were impressed by the passion and detail I put into my resultant application. The programme is being delivered in collaboration with Oaxifornia, who work with a network of artisans and international designers, and curated by Ana Elena Mallet one of Mexico’s leading contemporary design curators. We will be based at Oaxifornia’s beautiful restored farmhouse in Oaxaca, and will work towards developing product prototypes, leading to a ‘work in progress’ exhibition at Oaxaca’s leading design gallery, Tienda Q. I've just dug out this old photo, which I took in Oaxaca during a World Challenge, Asia Pacific adventure me and several school friends went on after our GCSE's. From what I can remember, it's much more colourful than this and I'm looking forward to revisiting soon.
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A www.cultceramics.co.uk photo shoot in the studio today with the fabulous photographer Lesley Lau. Here I am demonstrating how I carve the facets into the hexagonal Vinegar Vase vessel at the model making stage. The stillage makes for a handsome backdrop yet again.
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Yesterday afternoon, we acquired our second Union Graduate lathe, meaning the studio now has one for wet work (plaster model making) and one for dry (foam model making). These machines represent British engineering at its best; provided they are lovingly cared for, they'll last forever. Although, not everything lasts forever - I bought it (for a relative bargain) from a furniture conservation company in Battersea that is sadly closing down. They had an impressive setup with a huge amount of skill and experience under one roof, however, for various reasons they couldn't secure the business's future. This quote from Ruskin was immortalised on the workshop wall.
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S E M I C Y L I N D E R work in progress
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Here is a plaster model for a bespoke project mould I am making. The boards surrounding it, which have been carefully aligned and tensioned so they follow the tapered form, will contain the plaster mixture subsequently poured over the model to make the first (and largest) part of the mould.
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As ever, one of the most enjoyable aspects of my job is the is the interesting people I get to meet along the way, who share my enthusiasm for the craft and design of ceramics and the value it can bring to their lives or business. 2016 was a busy year for collaborations, which thankfully developed not only new work but new methods of making too. I'm very much looking forward to what 2017 holds with various industrial design and studio made projects lined up, both home and abroad. This year is set to be full of excitement on a personal level too, as my wife Trish and I are expecting a baby in March. So, in a few months time you'll likely see another little person occasionally popping up on here offering his or her own opinion on my work. Here's to what the future holds.
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Plywood & Paper / modelling a new product in my studio. Exciting plans for 2017.
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