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Ron Sims
Worked at King County, WA
Attended Central Washington University
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Ron Sims

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Operation Northwoods is a reminder of the benefits to our democracy of keeping the military and our intelligence agencies under strict and stringent control of the President and Congress. It is important that voters hold these both accountable.

Operation Northwoods
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Northwoods

"Operation Northwoods was a series of false flag proposals that originated within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) of the United States government in 1962. The proposals, which called for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), or other operatives, to commit acts of terrorism in US cities and elsewhere, were rejected by the Kennedy administration.[2]

At the time of the proposal, Cuba had recently become communist under Fidel Castro. The operation proposed creating public support for a war against Cuba by blaming it for terrorist acts.[3] To this end, Operation Northwoods proposals recommended hijackings and bombings followed by the introduction of phony evidence that would implicate the Cuban government. It stated:

The desired resultant from the execution of this plan would be to place the United States in the apparent position of suffering defensible grievances from a rash and irresponsible government of Cuba and to develop an international image of a Cuban threat to peace in the Western Hemisphere."
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Captain Jack's profile photoBrock Howell's profile photo
 
So frustrating. What's the likelihood similar acts have been committed by the CIA/FBI to establish public sentiment justifying other military/police actions?
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Ron Sims

2014 NFL Draft  - 
 
Furthermore, Latimer is not only an athletic freak but he is a really good football player as well. He's fast, has phenomenal body control, terrific hands, is a tremendous blocker, and plays with aggression. NFL analyst and former Seahawks scout Bucky Brooks recently mentioned Latimer as a player that could sneak into the back of the first. Brooks wrote:
"Latimer suddenly is one of the hottest names in the draft, following a spectacular pro-day workout that showcased his explosive athleticism -- just a few months after foot surgery, to boot. With the game tape confirming Latimer's dynamic traits as a playmaker in space, scouts and coaches are pegging the Indiana product as a potential No. 1 receiver. Thus, he has emerged as a legitimate candidate for selection at the bottom of the first round."
The word is out, Cody Latimer is really good.
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Berry A
 
I looked at his scouting report. Former basketball player with who has been productive on the football field. Injured his foot, so he couldn't run at the combine. He did manage to bench press 225 lbs 23 times. At his March pro day he ran a 4.38 40 time (I usually add .1 seconds to get close to combine numbers). His few problems are injury and concerns that he is a 1 year wonder. Probably picked up in the late 2nd or early 3rd round. 
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Voice of America ‏@VOA_News
NATO Recon Shows 40,000 Russian Troops, Hardware on Ukraine Border http://bit.ly/QbsIgz
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What works best for recovery after stroke-induced impairment? We asked three experts in stroke rehabilitation: Howard S. Kirshner, MD, professor and vice-chairman of neurology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville; Samir Belagaje, MD, director of stroke rehabilitation at Emory University's Marcus Stroke and Neuroscience Center in Atlanta; and Larry B. Goldstein, MD, director of Duke University's stroke center. They emphasized the value of team-based treatment approaches and therapies that harness neuroplasticity.
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1. Charts: Seattle’s declining car traffic
2. The journal that gave in to climate deniers
3. Metro = not Pierce and Community Transit
4. Is Portland paying for drones?
5. Seattle builder aims low
6. Living wage for SF airport workers has worked
7. Eating road kill: Yuck or yum?
8. The Times doesn’t know how to increase efficiency
9. 13 climate messaging principles
10. Photos: The shared state
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Finally!!!!!!

The title of the document shown by TVECA appeared to fit expectations that the FDA's move will be to bring e-cigarettes under largely the same regulatory scheme as other tobacco products, which would involve blocking sales to minors and restricting marketing.
The agency has had e-cigarettes on its agenda for years, but finally sent a draft proposed rule to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) last fall; action was further delayed by the partial government shutdown.
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Of the many statistics that expose America’s increasingly wide wealth gap, there is one that has stuck with me this week: The top 10% of wage earners in the U.S. receive half the income of all wage earners combined. 
It is a function of simple math that people at the top of a wage scale will grab a bigger share of the money, but that share is not constant. According to Thomas Piketty of the Paris School of Economics, the highest 10% took in just a third of all income in 1960. In a New York Times interview, Piketty said a large proportion of the current rise to nearly 50% is due to the recent sharp increase in “supersalaries” being paid to senior executives. 
Now, this may be simplistic math, but it strikes me that if supersalaries are taking a larger share, that means there is less left to pay workers and managers well down the corporate ladder. In other words, one cause of middle-class income stagnation might just be the greed at the top.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/topoftheticket/la-na-tt-corporate-success-shared-20140418,0,2951383.story#ixzz2zGyg6YPY
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Being a doctor has become "the most miserable profession," according to a story in The Daily Beast.
Yet physicians' bedside manner affects patients' health, a study shows.
And it was to be expected: the lawyers are combing through the Medicare pay data looking for fraud.
The attorney for the youth charged with last week's Murrysville, Pa., high school stabbing spree now says bullying may have been a factor, after initially denying it.
On the other hand, psychiatry eminence grise Allen Frances, MD, argues in Psychiatric Times that we should forget about trying to understand the motivations of homicidal maniacs and focus instead on locking up the guns.
Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) released a report charging e-cigarette manufacturers with targeting youth in their marketing. Along with other Senate Democrats, Durbin is pressuring the FDA to speed up regulation of the nicotine dispensers.
MERS-coronavirus has been reported in Yemen indicating a further spread of the virus that first appeared in Saudi Arabia 2 years ago and bird flu is back in Japan after a 3-year absence, Reuters reports.
Ford Vox, MD, writing at KevinMD decries the "growing gotcha genre of health journalism that portrays doctors as the enemy in a struggle for honesty and openness in medicine." Case in point: a ProPublica/Boston Globe takedown of Yoav Golan, MD, of Tufts University.
Some physician groups participating in the "Choosing Wisely" campaign listed seldom-performed, low-revenue tests and treatments rather than others that might have substantially affected their members' incomes, Kaiser Health News and the Chicago Tribune charge.
Dan Fagin's book about environmental pollution and childhood cancers in Toms River, N.J., has won a Pulitzer Prize.
Researchers may have figured out why increased viral infections are a problem with the oral multiple sclerosis drug fingolimod (Gilenya), writes Mitch Leslie at MS Discovery Forum.
A mumps outbreak centered at Ohio State University has sickened more than 100 people, with the statewide total nearly doubling in just the past 2 weeks, Reuters reported. Normally, one case would be expected in the Columbus area in a year.
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medpageToday: "A plant extract used in traditional Chinese medicine was as effective as methotrexate for the short-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and was superior when the two agents were given in combination, an open-label randomized trial showed."
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Polar bears are rejoicing in research led by scientists at WSU. It seems that arid ecosystems - think deserts - are pretty darn good at absorbing not-so-good CO2 carbon emissions. The WSU researcher reports that as atmospheric CO2 levels go up, large, arid landscapes increase their carbon intake to help take up some of the excess. Learn more: http://tinyurl.com/kq5hm3v Go Cougs means a whole new thing, world.
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Introduction

Ron Sims was unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate on May 6, 2009, and sworn in as the Deputy Secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on May 8, 2009. As the second most senior official at HUD, Sims is responsible for managing the Department's day-to-day operations, a nearly $40 billion annual operating budget, and the agency's 8,500 employees.


While serving three terms, Sims was nationally recognized for his work on transportation, homelessness, climate change, health care reform, urban development and affordable housing. His leadership in affordable housing and multiple community and housing partnerships have funded 5,632 units of housing during his 12 years.

Sims previously served as the Executive for the King County, Washington, the 13th largest county in the nation in a metropolitan area of 1.8 million residents and 39 cities including the cities of Seattle, Bellevue and Redmond.

One of the hallmarks of the Sims Administration in King County was the integration of environmental, social equity and public health policies that produced groundbreaking work on climate change, health care reform, affordable housing, mass transit, environmental protection, land use, and equity and social justice.

Sims is also a proponent of Smart Growth programs and the preservation of green space before it is lost to development. The policies he implemented in King County stopped costly sprawl and resulted in 96 percent of new construction being concentration in urban areas with only 4% in rural areas.

Over the years Sims developed a reputation as a tireless legislator, working on a diverse palette of issues that led to advances in the areas of the environment, education, public safety and the protection of workers' rights. He credits his drive in part with marching alongside his politically active parents in the 1950's and 1960's during the civil rights movement led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Those experiences honed in him a passion for civil rights issues that has been a guidepost throughout his career.

Sims was named Leader of the Year by American City and County Magazine in July, 2008 and was recognized as one of Governing Magazine's Government Officials of the Year in 2007. He has been honored with national awards from the Sierra Club, the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Sims joined Senator Edward Kennedy and California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as recipients of the 2008 Health Quality Award from the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Sims and King County are also recipients of HUD's prestigious Robert L. Woodson Jr. Affordable Communities Award for 2005.

Born in Spokane, Washington in 1948, Sims is a graduate of Central Washington University.


Education
  • Central Washington University
    Psychology, 1966 - 1971
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YouTube
Work
Occupation
Retired Deputy Secretary of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
Employment
  • King County, WA
    King County Executive, 1996 - 2009
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Gender
Male
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