Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Bob Johnson
352 followers
352 followers
About
Posts

Post has shared content
More input to how electrotherapy may be changing chronic pain impulses.
Can cells “remember” injuries, leading to chronic pain?

Chronic pain may persist because cells carry “memories” of injuries—ie, molecular footprints that add up to more lasting damage. Nerve damage changes the epigenetic marks on some of the genes in the immune cells in the nervous system (in mice). The cells examined in a study still behaved normally, but the existence of these epigenetic marks may mean that they carry a ‘memory’ of the initial injury.

http://bit.ly/252dkV9
Study: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.04.063 (ungated)
Photo
Add a comment...

Does anyone in this group know or understand the concept of "signaling"?   I'm referencing the multiple comments of how cells "signal" each other and supposedly this "signal" creates absorption of certain nutrients, minerals, is source of "communiction" between cells etc.   Exactly what is a signal?  Is it particulate, or energy, or magnetism, or polarity or what?   Used so often but I have yet to find anyone who can define what it really is.  Can you help?

Post has shared content
It seems some MS patients and their families get confused on the difference between "muscle stimulation" and "functional electrical stimulation" when they read Dr. Wahl's book.   With MS the first step is to restore function, or retard further loss of function.   Function means being able for the brain to summon the movement of a hand so the hand can perform functions of daily living.  Muscle stimulation is more related to "atrophy" or loss of muscle bulk due to inactivity.  The first point is to restore function and once function is restored then to increase muscle bulk and strength.  Sometimes the discussion of the two gets the cart before the horse. 

Post has shared content
It seems some MS patients and their families get confused on the difference between "muscle stimulation" and "functional electrical stimulation" when they read Dr. Wahl's book.   With MS the first step is to restore function, or retard further loss of function.   Function means being able for the brain to summon the movement of a hand so the hand can perform functions of daily living.  Muscle stimulation is more related to "atrophy" or loss of muscle bulk due to inactivity.  The first point is to restore function and once function is restored then to increase muscle bulk and strength.  Sometimes the discussion of the two gets the cart before the horse. 

Post has shared content
It seems some MS patients and their families get confused on the difference between "muscle stimulation" and "functional electrical stimulation" when they read Dr. Wahl's book.   With MS the first step is to restore function, or retard further loss of function.   Function means being able for the brain to summon the movement of a hand so the hand can perform functions of daily living.  Muscle stimulation is more related to "atrophy" or loss of muscle bulk due to inactivity.  The first point is to restore function and once function is restored then to increase muscle bulk and strength.  Sometimes the discussion of the two gets the cart before the horse. 

It seems some MS patients and their families get confused on the difference between "muscle stimulation" and "functional electrical stimulation" when they read Dr. Wahl's book.   With MS the first step is to restore function, or retard further loss of function.   Function means being able for the brain to summon the movement of a hand so the hand can perform functions of daily living.  Muscle stimulation is more related to "atrophy" or loss of muscle bulk due to inactivity.  The first point is to restore function and once function is restored then to increase muscle bulk and strength.  Sometimes the discussion of the two gets the cart before the horse. 

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded