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Fraigun Law Group
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At Fraigun Law Group, we have represented thousands of clients in all kinds of employment cases.

  
These include wrongful termination, sexual orientation, race, gender, disability, age, pregnancy discrimination and harassment, sexual harassment, and all kinds of wage and hour claims.
Here is information from The Fair Employment and Housing Act that I would like to share with you today:

FOR EMPLOYMENT COMPLAINTS

For Employment The Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) prohibits harassment and discrimination in employment because of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), gender, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin (including language use restrictions), ancestry, mental and physical disability, medical condition (cancer/genetic characteristics), age (40 and above), genetic information, military and veteran status, denial of medical and family care leave, pregnancy disability leave (Government Code sections 2940,12945,12945.2) and/or retaliation for protesting illegal discrimination related to one of these categories or for reporting patient abuse in tax supported institutions.  You may file a private lawsuit under the Fair Employment & Housing Act. 
For employment discrimination issues, you are required to exhaust your administrative remedies with the Department by securing your Notice of Right to Sue.

Complaints of discrimination must be filed with the Department within one year from the date of the alleged discriminatory act.  For victims who are under the age of 18, complaints of discrimination must be filed no later than one year of that person’s 18th birthday.
General Complaint Information.
(n.d.). Retrieved June 4, 2015, from http://dfeh.ca.gov/generalinformationcomplaints.htm

Fraigun Law Group has an excellent reputation, and we are known for our aggressive representation in the court room and negotiating settlements for damages incurred. We understand the challenges at work you must face every day just doing your job. When a potential client shares inappropriate actions by their boss or fellow worker, or when an employer chooses to bend the rules and it negatively affects you, we understand how a person feels hurt and abused. 

Sometimes in a first phone call we are able to determine if your case meets the legal definition of discrimination. During our initial consultation we will almost always know if yours is a case that can be won. 

Contact us immediately and let us help you with your case. 

We are always here to fight for your rights.
Add a comment...

At Fraigun Law Group we care about our clients. We will tell you the truth, whether it’s positive or negative. We care enough to answer phone calls and return messages in a timely manner.  We will talk to you until you understand your legal position.

We are always looking for ways to educate our clients on their legal rights.  Below is an article from The California Department of Fair Employment on workplace discrimination and harassment:

CALIFORNIA LAW PROHIBITS WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT

The California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) enforces laws that protect you from illegal discrimination and harassment in employment based on your actual or perceived:

• Ancestry

• Age (40 and above)

• Color

• Disability (physical and mental, including HIV and AIDS)

• Genetic information

• Gender, gender identity, or gender expression

• Marital status

• Medical condition (genetic characteristics, cancer or a record or history of cancer)

• Military or veteran status

• National origin (includes language use restrictions)

• Race

• Religion (includes religious dress and grooming practices)

• Sex (includes pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding and/or related medical conditions)

• Sexual orientation

• Prohibit harassment of employees, applicants, and independent contractors by any persons and require employers to take all reasonable steps to prevent harassment. This includes a prohibition against sexual harassment, gender harassment, harassment based on pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding and/or related medical conditions, as well as harassment based on all other characteristics listed above.

• Prohibit employers from limiting or prohibiting the use of any language in any workplace unless justified by business necessity. The employer must notify employees of the language restriction and consequences for violation.

• Require that all employers provide information to each of their employees on the nature, illegality, and legal remedies that apply to sexual harassment. Employers may either develop their own publications, which must meet standards set forth in California Government Code section 12950, or use a brochure from the DFEH.

• Require employers with 50 or more employees and all public entities to provide sexual harassment prevention training for all supervisors.

• Require employers to reasonably accommodate an employee or job applicant’s religious beliefs and practices, including the wearing or carrying of religious clothing, jewelry or artifacts, and hair styles, facial hair, or body hair, which are part of an individual’s observance of his or her religious beliefs.

• Require employers to reasonably accommodate employees or job applicants with a disability to enable them to perform the essential functions of a job.

• Permit job applicants and employees to file complaints with the DFEH against an employer, employment agency, or labor union that fails to grant equal employment as required by law.

• Prohibit discrimination against any job applicant or employee in hiring, promotions, assignments, termination, or any term, condition, or privilege of employment.
 
• Require employers, employment agencies, and unions to preserve applications, personnel records, and employment referral records for a minimum of two years.

• Require employers to provide leaves of up to four months to employees disabled because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition.

• Require an employer to provide reasonable accommodations requested by an employee, on the advice of her health care provider, related to her pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

• Require employers of 50 or more persons to allow eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks leave in a 12-month period for the birth of a child; the placement of a child for adoption or foster care; for an employee’s own serious health condition; or to care for a parent, spouse, or child with a serious health condition. The law also requires employers to post a notice informing employees of their family and medical leave rights.

• Require employment agencies to serve all applicants equally, refuse discriminatory job orders, and prohibit employers and employment agencies from making discriminatory pre-hiring inquiries or publishing help-wanted advertisements that express a discriminatory hiring preference.

• Prohibit unions from discriminating in member admissions or dispatching members to jobs.

• Prohibit retaliation against a person who opposes, reports, or assists another person to oppose unlawful discrimination.

(n.d.). Retrieved June 2, 2015, from
http://dfeh.ca.gov/res/docs/Publications/DFEH-162.pdf.pdf
--------------------------
If you feel that any of this applies to your situation at work, call us!

Fraigun Law Group has an excellent reputation, and we are known for our aggressive representation in the court room and negotiating settlements for damages incurred. We understand the challenges at work you must face every day just doing your job. When a potential client shares inappropriate actions by their boss or fellow worker, or when an employer chooses to bend the rules and it negatively affects you, we understand how a person feels hurt and abused.

Sometimes in a first phone call we are able to determine if your case meets the legal definition of discrimination. During our initial consultation we will almost always know if yours is a case that can be won.

Contact us immediately and let us help you with your case.

We are always here to fight for your rights.
Add a comment...

At Fraigun Law Group we care about our clients. We will tell you the truth, whether it’s positive or negative. We care enough to answer phone calls and return messages in a timely manner.  We will talk to you until you understand your legal position.

We are always looking for ways to educate our clients on their legal rights.  Below is an article from The California Department of Fair Employment on workplace discrimination and harassment:

CALIFORNIA LAW PROHIBITS WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT

The California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) enforces laws that protect you from illegal discrimination and harassment in employment based on your actual or perceived:

• Ancestry

• Age (40 and above)

• Color

• Disability (physical and mental, including HIV and AIDS)

• Genetic information

• Gender, gender identity, or gender expression

• Marital status

• Medical condition (genetic characteristics, cancer or a record or history of cancer)

• Military or veteran status

• National origin (includes language use restrictions)

• Race

• Religion (includes religious dress and grooming practices)

• Sex (includes pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding and/or related medical conditions)

• Sexual orientation

• Prohibit harassment of employees, applicants, and independent contractors by any persons and require employers to take all reasonable steps to prevent harassment. This includes a prohibition against sexual harassment, gender harassment, harassment based on pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding and/or related medical conditions, as well as harassment based on all other characteristics listed above.

• Prohibit employers from limiting or prohibiting the use of any language in any workplace unless justified by business necessity. The employer must notify employees of the language restriction and consequences for violation.

• Require that all employers provide information to each of their employees on the nature, illegality, and legal remedies that apply to sexual harassment. Employers may either develop their own publications, which must meet standards set forth in California Government Code section 12950, or use a brochure from the DFEH.

• Require employers with 50 or more employees and all public entities to provide sexual harassment prevention training for all supervisors.

• Require employers to reasonably accommodate an employee or job applicant’s religious beliefs and practices, including the wearing or carrying of religious clothing, jewelry or artifacts, and hair styles, facial hair, or body hair, which are part of an individual’s observance of his or her religious beliefs.

• Require employers to reasonably accommodate employees or job applicants with a disability to enable them to perform the essential functions of a job.

• Permit job applicants and employees to file complaints with the DFEH against an employer, employment agency, or labor union that fails to grant equal employment as required by law.

• Prohibit discrimination against any job applicant or employee in hiring, promotions, assignments, termination, or any term, condition, or privilege of employment.
 
• Require employers, employment agencies, and unions to preserve applications, personnel records, and employment referral records for a minimum of two years.

• Require employers to provide leaves of up to four months to employees disabled because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition.

• Require an employer to provide reasonable accommodations requested by an employee, on the advice of her health care provider, related to her pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

• Require employers of 50 or more persons to allow eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks leave in a 12-month period for the birth of a child; the placement of a child for adoption or foster care; for an employee’s own serious health condition; or to care for a parent, spouse, or child with a serious health condition. The law also requires employers to post a notice informing employees of their family and medical leave rights.

• Require employment agencies to serve all applicants equally, refuse discriminatory job orders, and prohibit employers and employment agencies from making discriminatory pre-hiring inquiries or publishing help-wanted advertisements that express a discriminatory hiring preference.

• Prohibit unions from discriminating in member admissions or dispatching members to jobs.

• Prohibit retaliation against a person who opposes, reports, or assists another person to oppose unlawful discrimination.

(n.d.). Retrieved June 2, 2015, from
http://dfeh.ca.gov/res/docs/Publications/DFEH-162.pdf.pdf
--------------------------
If you feel that any of this applies to your situation at work, call us!

Fraigun Law Group has an excellent reputation, and we are known for our aggressive representation in the court room and negotiating settlements for damages incurred. We understand the challenges at work you must face every day just doing your job. When a potential client shares inappropriate actions by their boss or fellow worker, or when an employer chooses to bend the rules and it negatively affects you, we understand how a person feels hurt and abused.

Sometimes in a first phone call we are able to determine if your case meets the legal definition of discrimination. During our initial consultation we will almost always know if yours is a case that can be won.

Contact us immediately and let us help you with your case.

We are always here to fight for your rights.
Add a comment...

Fraigun Law Group is here to protect you and your rights. If it requires aggressive representation or simply a supportive moment to help you understand the options available to you, we are the lawyers you will want on your team. Below is a list or Employer Obligations we thought you should be aware of for you to best understand the laws. 

Employer Obligations

All employers have a legal obligation to prevent sexual harassment.

• Employers must take all reasonable steps to prevent discrimination and harassment from occurring.

• Employers must help ensure a workplace free from sexual harassment by posting in the workplace a poster made available by the Department of Fair Employment and Housing.

• Employers must help ensure a workplace free from sexual harassment by distributing to employees information on sexual harassment. An employer may either distribute a brochure that may be obtained from the Department of Fair Employment and Housing or develop an equivalent document, which must meet the following requirements:

• The illegality of sexual harassment

• The definition of sexual harassment under state and federal laws
• A description of sexual harassment, utilizing examples
• The internal complaint process of the employer available to the employee

• The legal remedies and complaint process available through the Department and the Fair Employment and Housing Commission

• Directions on how to contact the Department and the Fair Employment and Housing Commission

• The protection against retaliation for opposing the practices prohibited by law or for filing a complaint with, or otherwise participating in investigative activities conducted by, the Department or the Commission

• Employers with 50 or more employees must provide at least two hours of classroom or other effective interactive training and education regarding sexual harassment to all supervisory employees who are employed as of July 1, 2005, and to all new supervisory employees within six months of assuming a supervisory position. Thereafter, covered employers must provide sexual harassment training and education to each supervisory employee once every two years.

Fair Employment and Housing - Sexual Harassment. (n.d.). Retrieved May 22, 2015, from http://www.dfeh.ca.gov/Publications_StatLaws_SexHarrass.htm

Fraigun Law Group has an excellent reputation, and we are known for our aggressive representation in the court room and negotiating settlements for damages incurred. We understand the challenges at work you must face every day just doing your job. When a potential client shares inappropriate actions by their boss or fellow worker, or when an employer chooses to bend the rules and it negatively affects you, we understand how a person feels hurt and abused. 

Sometimes in a first phone call we are able to determine if your case meets the legal definition of discrimination. During our initial consultation we will almost always know if yours is a case that can be won.

Contact us immediately and let us help you with your case.

We are always here to fight for your rights.
Add a comment...

Hello my friends and followers. I recently reviewed an article that discussed what the mandatory payroll requirements (if any) are by employers for employees if they are asked or required to work on any holiday or weekend.  I hope this answers your questions.

Hours worked on holidays, Saturdays, and Sundays are treated like hours worked on any other day of the week. California law does not require that an employer provide its employees with paid holidays, that it close its business on any holiday, or that employees be given the day off for any particular holiday. If an employer closes its business on holidays and gives its employees time off from work with pay, such a circumstance exists pursuant to a policy or practice adopted by the employer, pursuant to the terms of a collective bargaining agreement, or pursuant to the terms of an employment agreement between the employer and employee, as there is nothing in the law that requires such a practice. Additionally, there is nothing in the law that mandates an employer pay an employee a special premium for work performed on a holiday, Saturday, or Sunday, other than the overtime premium required for work performed in excess of eight hours in a workday or 40 hours in a workweek.

There are always questions individuals have about employer practices, and if you have questions or feel you have been the subject of inappropriate actions by your employer, we can always schedule a time to discuss those issues. 

We appreciate everyone who follows us here on Social Media and we hope the information we share is helpful to you, your family and friends.  It is always good to know there is someone prepared to be in your corner when problems arise. Never walk away quietly because you are afraid you may lose your job when you are mistreated at your place of employment. 

We are here for you. 
Add a comment...

Hello my friends and followers. I recently reviewed an article that discussed what the mandatory payroll requirements (if any) are by employers for employees if they are asked or required to work on any holiday or weekend.  I hope this answers your questions.

Hours worked on holidays, Saturdays, and Sundays are treated like hours worked on any other day of the week. California law does not require that an employer provide its employees with paid holidays, that it close its business on any holiday, or that employees be given the day off for any particular holiday. If an employer closes its business on holidays and gives its employees time off from work with pay, such a circumstance exists pursuant to a policy or practice adopted by the employer, pursuant to the terms of a collective bargaining agreement, or pursuant to the terms of an employment agreement between the employer and employee, as there is nothing in the law that requires such a practice. Additionally, there is nothing in the law that mandates an employer pay an employee a special premium for work performed on a holiday, Saturday, or Sunday, other than the overtime premium required for work performed in excess of eight hours in a workday or 40 hours in a workweek.

There are always questions individuals have about employer practices, and if you have questions or feel you have been the subject of inappropriate actions by your employer, we can always schedule a time to discuss those issues. 

We appreciate everyone who follows us here on Social Media and we hope the information we share is helpful to you, your family and friends.  It is always good to know there is someone prepared to be in your corner when problems arise. Never walk away quietly because you are afraid you may lose your job when you are mistreated at your place of employment. 

We are here for you. 
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Can an Employer Discriminate Based on Criminal History?
______________________________________

When dealing with an arrest or a criminal conviction, a lot of things may be on your mind. Being able to find a job may not be the first thing that comes to mind, but it can be a serious problem. Many employers will not even consider someone with an arrest, let alone a conviction. But is it legal for an employer to discriminate based on one's criminal background?

Unfortunately for some job seekers, there is no federal law that prohibits discrimination based on a criminal record. However, in a somewhat ironic twist of fate, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and a few courts have found that using criminal convictions to deny employment may actually be a form of racial discrimination. The reasoning: some racial groups are arrested and convicted at disproportionately high rates, meaning that using criminal convictions to deny employment may actually just be a way of hiding racial discrimination. 

Laws vary by jurisdiction, but employers may or may not be allowed to ask those applying for a job about their prior arrests or convictions. Some states only allow an employer to inquire about pending charges or past convictions if it is clear that the reply will only be relevant if it directly relates to the requirements of the job (e.g., obtaining a security clearance). As a general rule, an employer should only ask questions that are germane to the employment decision and not related to an applicant's personal life or membership in a protected class. Regardless of whether they can ask, the Internet has made mug shots and arrest records readily available with a simple search by the person's name, and background checks have been commercially available for years. 

The EEOC has issued rules based on the disparate racial impact of criminal convictions on certain minorities stating that the use of arrest records as an absolute bar to employment is prohibited. Nevertheless, as noted, if the charges for which the applicant was arrested or convicted have a direct impact on the requirements of employment, these matters are permissible areas of inquiry. The EEOC has recommended that if a criminal background does come up at any point in the interview process or during employment, the employer should offer the applicant or employee an opportunity to explain, and make appropriate follow-up investigations to determine the veracity of the applicant or employee's statements. 

If you believe that you or someone you know has wrongfully been denied employment, or terminated due to an arrest or conviction, you should contact our office. Each case is based on its own merits. Our firm is very focused on the discrimination aspects of employment law. Most important, our doors are always open to those who feel they have been wronged by an employer. 

Sometimes in a first phone call we are able to determine if your case meets the legal definition of discrimination. During our initial consultation we will almost always know if yours is a case that can be won. 

Contact us immediately and let us help you with your case. 

We are always here to fight for your rights.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Can an Employer Discriminate Based on Criminal History?
______________________________________

When dealing with an arrest or a criminal conviction, a lot of things may be on your mind. Being able to find a job may not be the first thing that comes to mind, but it can be a serious problem. Many employers will not even consider someone with an arrest, let alone a conviction. But is it legal for an employer to discriminate based on one's criminal background?

Unfortunately for some job seekers, there is no federal law that prohibits discrimination based on a criminal record. However, in a somewhat ironic twist of fate, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and a few courts have found that using criminal convictions to deny employment may actually be a form of racial discrimination. The reasoning: some racial groups are arrested and convicted at disproportionately high rates, meaning that using criminal convictions to deny employment may actually just be a way of hiding racial discrimination. 

Laws vary by jurisdiction, but employers may or may not be allowed to ask those applying for a job about their prior arrests or convictions. Some states only allow an employer to inquire about pending charges or past convictions if it is clear that the reply will only be relevant if it directly relates to the requirements of the job (e.g., obtaining a security clearance). As a general rule, an employer should only ask questions that are germane to the employment decision and not related to an applicant's personal life or membership in a protected class. Regardless of whether they can ask, the Internet has made mug shots and arrest records readily available with a simple search by the person's name, and background checks have been commercially available for years. 

The EEOC has issued rules based on the disparate racial impact of criminal convictions on certain minorities stating that the use of arrest records as an absolute bar to employment is prohibited. Nevertheless, as noted, if the charges for which the applicant was arrested or convicted have a direct impact on the requirements of employment, these matters are permissible areas of inquiry. The EEOC has recommended that if a criminal background does come up at any point in the interview process or during employment, the employer should offer the applicant or employee an opportunity to explain, and make appropriate follow-up investigations to determine the veracity of the applicant or employee's statements. 

If you believe that you or someone you know has wrongfully been denied employment, or terminated due to an arrest or conviction, you should contact our office, www.fraigunlaw.com. Each case is based on its own merits. Our firm is very focused on the discrimination aspects of employment law. Most important, our doors are always open to those who feel they have been wronged by an employer. 

Sometimes in a first phone call we are able to determine if your case meets the legal definition of discrimination. During our initial consultation we will almost always know if yours is a case that can be won. 

Contact us immediately and let us help you with your case. 

We are always here to fight for your rights.
Add a comment...

We are very proud of our successful court room outcomes. Creating marketing that describes what we do is sometimes challenging because we feel we are one of the top employment law firms in the Los Angeles area and to share that can be construed the wrong way by some readers. 

I believe we have figured out the best way to share our skills with our social media friends, and that is by sharing our client testimonials. Sharing what our representation did for them and their outcome can tell our success stories better than any ad

From L.H. Azusa California wrote:

A friend of mine recommended that I call Marina when he found out about my ongoing battle with my ex-employer. Our first meeting lasted over 2 hours. Marina was very detail-oriented and focused. I really appreciated that because she was not the first attorney I met. Some of them were all over the place. She made up her mind whether she would take my case right away and started working on it the very next day. 

She fought for me like it was her own case or like we were best friends. I felt very safe with her, in good hands. She really knows what she is talking about. She is not afraid to take a case to the court if she believes in it. I am really happy with the outcome of my case. 

I cannot thank her enough and would recommend her to everyone who seeks legal help in this field.

Thank you L.H. Check out our website fraigunlaw.com to read additional testimonials. I think the client that called me a Pit Bull is great. Yes we won her case…
Add a comment...

We are very proud of our successful court room outcomes. Creating marketing that describes what we do is sometimes challenging because we feel we are one of the top employment law firms in the Los Angeles area and to share that can be construed the wrong way by some readers. 

I believe we have figured out the best way to share our skills with our social media friends, and that is by sharing our client testimonials. Sharing what our representation did for them and their outcome can tell our success stories better than any ad

From L.H. Azusa California wrote:

A friend of mine recommended that I call Marina when he found out about my ongoing battle with my ex-employer. Our first meeting lasted over 2 hours. Marina was very detail-oriented and focused. I really appreciated that because she was not the first attorney I met. Some of them were all over the place. She made up her mind whether she would take my case right away and started working on it the very next day. 

She fought for me like it was her own case or like we were best friends. I felt very safe with her, in good hands. She really knows what she is talking about. She is not afraid to take a case to the court if she believes in it. I am really happy with the outcome of my case. 

I cannot thank her enough and would recommend her to everyone who seeks legal help in this field.

Thank you L.H. Check out our website fraigunlaw.com to read additional testimonials. I think the client that called me a Pit Bull is great. Yes we won her case…
Add a comment...
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