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Manvesh Sathe
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Digital Marketing Expert
Digital Marketing Expert

441 followers
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Tech leaders do the ice bucket challenge.

Besides +Leo Laporte getting the ice bucket treatment, the highlight of this roundup is that Google's +Larry Page  and +Sergey Brin wearing Pied Piper and Hooli shirts. : )  

http://youtu.be/FLLGBowAgD8

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It feels like just yesterday my wife, two kids and I packed all our belongings, sold our house in New Jersey, and made the long trip to California. It was almost 14 years ago, and I was on my way to join Google’s Search team. 

One of the more memorable moments during the years that followed was the company’s IPO, where Larry and Sergey introduced their vision to the world. I can’t believe that was 10 years ago tomorrow. Their founders’ letter [http://goo.gl/t7Ylc7] highlighted Google’s long-term focus:  

“Our business environment changes rapidly and needs long term investment. We will not hesitate to place major bets on promising new opportunities.”

Since 2004, Google has of course made a range of big bets: YouTube, Android, Chrome, Google Maps….and recently, many of the amazing long-term projects Google[x] is pursuing.

But the heart of Google is still search. And in the decade since our IPO, Google has made big bets on a range of hugely important areas in search that make today’s Google so much better than the 2004 version (see our homepage from back then below). Larry has described the perfect search engine as understanding exactly what you mean and giving you back exactly what you want. We’ve made a lot of progress on delivering you the right answers, faster. But we know that we have a long way to go -- it’s just the beginning.

I thought it might be fun to share the 10 biggest Google search milestones since 2004 that really stand out in my mind:

1. Autocomplete: We built a way for Google to predict the most likely useful words and phrases as you type, and even load search results instantly—so you can quickly get to that perfect recipe for “silky gingered zucchini soup” (even if you can’t remember the dish’s whole name). Typing out a whole phrase feels archaic.

2. Translations: Google Translate was barely a beta product ten years ago. Today people use it in 80 languages to do over a billion translations a day. Just tell Google to “translate 10 years into German” and see this magic in action.

3. Directions and traffic: Search used to be just about webpages, but our amazing Maps team made it possible to search the real world too. Now you can ask, “How far is it to Santa Cruz?” and with one tap you can open walking, biking, public transit, or driving directions—with the fastest route so you avoid traffic.

4. Universal search: Sometimes the best answer isn’t just text—if you’re asking about JFK’s “Moon Speech,” you probably want to watch John F. Kennedy deliver his famous speech. We’ve made that possible, blending different types of results so you get the most relevant info, no matter the format.

5. Mobile and new screens: No matter what device or platform you may be on, whether it’s a tablet or a smartphone (or even a watch!), you need information and answers. So we’ve adapted Search to all these new devices. This includes redesigning our mobile products to help those who weren’t born with the fastest typing thumbs! 

6. Voice search: Gone are the days of typing queries as clunky keywords—you can now ask questions by voice in the Google Search app. Instead of typing [weather chicago], just say “Ok Google, will I need an umbrella tomorrow?” We’ve invested years of research into speech recognition and natural language understanding, and voice search works in 38 languages today.

7. Actions: With the Google Search app you can quickly text, email or call someone without digging and typing. Just say: “Ok Google, send an email to Jason: do you guys want to go to the beach with us for a picnic this Saturday?” You can even set sophisticated reminders like “Remind me to pick up coffee filters next time I’m at Target,” and Google will buzz your phone when you get to any Target.

8. The Knowledge Graph: The world is made of real things, not just text strings. So we built the Knowledge Graph to show how things are connected—ask “How tall do you have to be to ride the Cyclone?” or “Who’s in the cast of Guardians of the Galaxy?”, and then click to explore across the web. 

9. Info just for you: If you’ve got a flight reservation saved in your Gmail, you can ask the Google Search app, “What gate does my flight leave from?” and get the answer directly. You can also ask about shipments ("Where's my package?") or for appointments (“When do I have yoga?”). All this is private of course, visible just to you. 

10. Answers before you have to ask: If you have the Google Search app on your phone, you'll get automatic help with everyday tasks. Google can automatically show you your plane, bus, and train reservations right when you need them; warnings when traffic is bad to your next appointment; reminders of bills coming due; a best guess at the last spot you parked; and much more.

And all that is just a sample of the work we’ve done since 2004. We made more than 890 improvements to Google Search last year alone, and we’re cranking away at new features and the next generation of big bets all the time. We've come a long way in 10 years -- on Google and so many other general and specialized search apps, it's now so much better than just the 10 blue links of years past. In 2024, the Google of 2014 will seem ancient, and the Google of 2004 prehistoric. 
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After almost ten years, +Nikesh Arora  our Chief Business Officer, has decided to leave Google to join one of our partners, SoftBank, as Vice Chairman of SoftBank Corp. and CEO of SoftBank Internet and Media.   I remember first meeting him at the British Museum, which for some reason Sergey had decided would be a good interview location. Nikesh has been a tremendous leader, adviser and mentor to many Googlers -- including me.  We have learned a lot together, and had a lot of fun along the way.  

+Omid Kordestani, who was our business founder and led our sales teams for many years, will be stepping in to lead our business organization for now.  When we hired Omid we had no business people so we had all the engineers interview him around a ping pong table.  I think he survived because he is actually an engineer!  Omid has always been one of my closest advisors, especially since I became CEO again in 2011.  He personifies the entrepreneurial spirit that is so important to Google.  There is nothing Omid doesn’t know about Google, our customers and partners, and I know that under his leadership the team will excel.  

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Google Is Removing Author Photos from Search. Why?

Anyone who follows me knows that I have invested heavily in trying to be one of the foremost experts on the subject of Google Authorship and Google's overall desire to be able to identify authors as topical authorities.

So you might imagine that it came as a huge shock to me when I heard the announcement today that Google will be removing author photos entirely from Google search results. Some might expect I'd even consider it a blow. I don't, but more on that below.

In addition to removing the photos, they will also no longer show Google+ circle counts for Google Authorship authors. All that will remain is a small byline in the result. For more details see http://searchengineland.com/google-plays-authorship-search-results-dropping-profile-image-google-circle-count-195163

Cleaning Up the SERPs
Google's +John Mueller had the following to say about this change:

We've been doing lots of work to clean up the visual design of our search results, in particular creating a better mobile experience and a more consistent design across devices. As a part of this, we're simplifying the way authorship is shown in mobile and desktop search results, removing the profile photo and circle count. (Our experiments indicate that click-through behavior on this new less-cluttered design is similar to the previous one.)

And that's why this doesn't come as a huge surprise to me. Google has been telling us (and signalling by much of what they've done) that the game for the future of search is now to be won or lost on the mobile playing field. But with the addition of a street band's worth of bells and whistles on the SERPs these past few years, they had set themselves up for a very wobbly and inconsistent search experience.

In short, mobile users want things simple and clean.

It's the same thing most of us do when we realize it's finally time to unclutter our houses. Ultimately, some things must go. You hold up each object and try to think of ways you could justify keeping it, but in the interest of the bigger project (a cleaner, less cluttered house), that old bowling trophy goes into the waste bin.

The End of Authorship? Hells No
That's how I think the decision process went down at Google. I think they understood the value of the author photos, but at the end of the day, whatever that value was, it was not greater than the value they'd gain by uncluttering their search pages.

Google Authorship continues. Qualifying authors will still get a byline on search results, so Google hasn't abandoned it. 

Besides, the bigger project here for Google I think is not author photos in search but the much ballyhooed but so far elusive "author rank," the ability to confidently determine who the content creators are in any given topic whom most people trust, and boost their content when appropriate. At SMX Advanced this month +Matt Cutts indicated that was still a priority, but was also still a long way off in being accomplished.

This is a long haul project folks. Don't head for the lifeboats every time Google makes a change.

Am I disappointed to see the photos going? I sure am. But such is the search business. Google isn't driven by whims or emotions. If they're doing this, they're doing it because their data and testing tells them it will be for the better in the long run.

The biggest downside I see is that probably now there will be less incentive for new people to use Authorship markup. But I have a feeling Google isn't worried about that. As I've been saying, they know that most people never would adopt it anyway. They've got to be working on the ability to identify authors and their content without depending on markup.

That's coming, but it will take a while. Stay tuned!

For another very thoughtful take on this development, I highly recommend this post by +Eli Fennellhttp://stonet.co/TkfMpU

#googleauthorship   #authorship   #googleauthorrank   #authorrank  
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If your site starts associating with unrelated queries that are popular with spammers, such as queries related to pharmaceuticals, payday loans or replica goods, it’s time to start investigating for 3rd party attacks.

A good way to look out for these unexpected queries is to set up Google Alerts (http://goo.gl/eVox96). For example, if you set up an alert for [site:example.com (viagra|cialis|casino|loans)], we’ll notify you when these keywords appear on your site.

We're halfway through our #NoHacked campaign. Share your best hacking prevention tips and don't forget to include the #NoHacked hashtag!
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This has to be the most inspiring article I've read this month. It's not about the World Cup. It's about a scientist and his team. They are about to change the world and you have to read this story. I promise it's worth your time :-)

#magicalscience   #gobrazil    

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Automatic Journey Begins.. New autonomous ERA is coming soon
Fully autonomous driving has always been the goal of our project, because we think this could improve road safety and help lots of people who can't drive. 

We're now developing prototypes of vehicles that have been designed from the ground up to drive themselves—just push a button and they'll take you where you want to go! We'll use these vehicles to test our software and learn what it will really take to bring this technology into the world. 

Learn more: http://goo.gl/qDUtgq

आजचा आनंद साजरा करायला सगळे आहेत तरी देखील काहीतरी अपुरे अपुरे वाटतय उणिव भासते फक्त एका गोष्टीची . ....... आज बाळासाहेब हवे होते. NAMO NAMAH!!

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And Then

Last month, my wife's uncle died in a tragic accident in LA when the bicycle he was using to get lunch was hit by a truck. At the memorial service his daughter relayed a very touching story. 

She said her dad (who was her best friend) called every day to talk. But instead of opening the call with the customary "How are you" or "What's going on", her dad always opened the conversation with "And then?" Her father viewed each conversation as a continuation of the last, and what pained her the most was that there were to be no more "and thens". I cried. 

Since then I've thought a lot about how similar this is to our life's endeavors. We pour our heart and soul into our work and it becomes something we love and cherish. But even the challenges we work on today will one day become "and thens" as we move on to the next. 

Today I'm announcing my departure from Google after almost 8 years.

I have been incredibly fortunate to work with the amazing people of Google. I don't believe there is a more talented and passionate collection of people anywhere else. And I'm overwhelmed when I think about the leadership of +Larry Page and what he empowered me to do while at Google. From starting Google I/O, to being responsible for all mobile applications, to creating Google+, none of this would have happened without Larry's encouragement and support.

I'm also forever in debt to the Google+ team. This is a group of people who built social at Google against the skepticism of so many. The growth of active users is staggering, and speaks to the work of this team. But it doesn't tell you what kind of people they are. They are invincible dreamers. I love them. And I will miss them dearly.

Finally, thank you to all those who I've met on Google+. The community here has been so supportive that I don't even know how to say thank you. You all make Google+. Without you, this social network wouldn't exist. Your support for Google+, and for me personally is something I will never forget. 

But, now is the time for a new journey. A continuation. An "and then". I am excited about what's next. But this isn't the day to talk about that. This is a day to celebrate the past 8 years. To cry. And smile. And to look forward to the journey yet to come.

And then....
+Vic Gundotra 



#andthen    
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If you getting 'false' visitors from the SEMalt bot which are playing havoc with your figures, this short guide will tell how to exclude them using a Google Analytics filter
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