Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Jesse Sierke
103 followers -
Sailor, and some other stuff
Sailor, and some other stuff

103 followers
About
Jesse's interests
View all
Jesse's posts

My foray into audiobooks via the Audible app has led me back to one of my first loves, Ursula Le Guin. When I read A Wizard of Earthsea as a child, I was floored by the fact that someone had discovered my inner world, in which I had amazing, untapped powers, and just needed the help of a friendly mentor to become the most powerful wizard the world had ever known. Le Guin's fantasy gave me a taste for low-magic settings in which life is short and difficult for most people, who go about their mundane lives without much wonder, but once in a blue moon, something happens that changes everything and rekindles long-forgotten power. Now, having taken the plunge into Le Guin's science fiction through The Found and the Lost, a collection of her novellas, I am fully immersed into her brand of futurism. I will borrow from Neil Gaiman one of several phrases he uses to describe the point of Science Fiction, namely "why not?". Le Guin's settings and characters are framed by this question as they immerse us into fascinating, imaginary societies much like our own, but different in key ways which shed light on the assumptions which contemporary, industrialized Earthlings often make about what life should be like. I've stayed on the train past my stop, and am now traveling sequentially through what her fans have labeled the Hainish Cycle. The first book I chose in this series is The Left Hand of Darkness, which stands in stark contrast to other cutting-edge fiction written in the 1960s and '70s by women in that it does not drive home feminist theses with a blunt instrument. Instead, it says, in so many words, "consider a society in which the male-female dichotomy does not exist." Sure, it might be better in some ways, but in disposing with gender, humans might lose the wisdom we can gain by interaction with the Other. Her point is not to make us want to do away with sex roles in our own society, but to evaluate them honestly, and to draw our own conclusions from her thought experiment.

Post has attachment
This is the first in what I hope will be a series on what it was like to grow up Pagan.

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
My wife's spiritual growth laid bare.

Great article about ways for alcoholics like me to cook without alcohol.

Post has attachment
I remember going to Disney World as a seven-year old and getting my picture taken with a comically mean-looking character whom I couldn't identify. Now I know that it was the Sheriff of Nottingham. I don't think my parents ever took me to see this one. I saw it as an adult for the first time when my wife and I bought it on VHS for our daughter. I agree with the writer of this blog post that it was needlessly anachronistic.

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Post has attachment

Someone posted a question on the rec.games.frp.dnd Google Group about elf ears. Here is my reply:
me
In my campaign world, elves and other faerie folk have a humanoid form and either an animal, plant, or mineral form depending on type. In humanoid form, elves are able to manifest animal or plant parts to augment their senses and abilities. Eyes and ears are the most common augmentation, but snouts, claws, hooves, horns, wings, scales, gemstones, metals, leaves, bark, and flowers can be found, too. Pointy ears are so common only because canid and felid folk have a long-standing relationship with human society.

Wait while more posts are being loaded