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Lauren Seibert
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Writer, Artist, Humanitarian Activist. West Africa team at Human Rights Watch.
Writer, Artist, Humanitarian Activist. West Africa team at Human Rights Watch.

85 followers
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Just part of the President of Senegal's entourage yesterday, no big deal... And I couldn't resist this photo... priceless!!! #MackySallHats #Kolda #SenegalFashion #PeaceCorps
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The best way to survive 2 years with the Peace Corps? Work hard and laugh often ;)

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Tips for anyone in West Africa / Senegal wondering how to interact with talibés...

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How to React to Talibés: 7 Tips for Peace Corps Volunteers
Talibé children in Senegal and the flood of issues connected to them – from health to human rights and child protection – have become my world for the past year and a half. I almost can’t even remember what it was like to first arrive in country and see the...

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Ever wondered what it's like to be a city versus a village volunteer in Africa? Here are my thoughts...

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City or Village Life: Which Would You Choose?
Truth be told, I would never say I wish I had been one of those Peace Corps Volunteers placed in a village. I’m happy being a city volunteer in Senegal, because it satisfies my inner drive to always be on the go. I can never be bored here, at least in a wor...

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A glimpse into some of the strange and funny and different aspects of my Peace Corps life in Senegal... and more to come!

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Snapshots of Senegal Life
My daily ritual looks like this: wake up to the roosters crowing at 4 AM, followed by the muezzin’s call to prayer. Go back to sleep for a few precious hours. Wake up again to animal sounds and the scratch of my host sisters’ twig brooms sweeping up the dus...

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Eyes on Talibés in Kolda: Our First Regional Talibé Conference
I really didn’t know how it would go down. I honestly didn’t know if everyone we invited would show up. But there they were, 38 talibé boys flowing into the room, shaking my hand shyly. The next day, 39 Kolda villagers showed up – both men and women. On the...
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