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Pat Morin
Works at Carleton University
Attended Carleton University
Lives in Ottawa
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Pat Morin

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Goodbye Lord Vader....
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Pat Morin

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Are you an Australian scientists working on quantum computing, high-performance computing, or fault-tolerant systems who wants to discuss your work with you colleagues overseas? Better get permission first, or be prepared to spend up to 10 years in prison.
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A sick person cannot work.
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Pat Morin

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Christmas Eve, 10:30am, Ottawa, Canada.
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Je te souhaite un joyeux Noël.
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Tl;Dr; the government of Quebec wants ISPs to block online gambling sites. Why? So they can run their own, of course.
 
The Government of Quebec has introduced new legislation that requires Internet service providers to block access to unlicensed online gambling sites. The provisions are contained in an omnibus bill implementing elements of the government's spring budget,…
The Government of Quebec has introduced new legislation that requires Internet service providers to block access to unlicensed online gambling sites. The provisions are contained in an omnibus bill implementing elements of the government's spring budget, which included a promise to establish website blocking requirements. The bill provides that "an Internet service provider may not give access to an online gambling site whose operation is not aut...
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Oliver AC's profile photoPat Morin's profile photo
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+Oliver AC​: yep, it will be trivial to work around. It does, however, set a bad precedent. If they can force ISPs to give them a monopoly on online gambling, then what's next?
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It seems there is a workaround the NSERC/Elsevier incompatibility that will work for some of us.  The published Elsevier policy on Article Sharing states that an author can immediately update an arXiv or RePEC preprint with the accepted manuscript.

Just to be clear: The scenario that seems to work is the following:

1. Submit to an Elsevier journal and simultaneously post a preprint on the arXiv or RePEC.

2. Get editor/referee feedback, edit the paper accordingly and have the editor acknowledge that this is the accepted manuscript (usually this is when they ask for your latex sources).

3. Update the original arXiv submission with your accepted manuscript, being sure to choose the CC BY-NC-SA license when updating.

As far as I can tell, this keeps you in good standing with NSERC and doesn't violate the Elsevier publishing agreement.
Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services
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As of May 1st, 2015, Tri-Council-funded Canadian computer scientists can no longer publish in most of Elsevier's computer science journals without paying roughly $3000.

NSERC requires that the accepted version of a journal article be made available through an open-access repository within 12 months of journal publication.

Elsevier journals now have a 24 month embargo period (starting at the publication date) during which you are not allowed post the accepted version of a journal article.

As far as I can see, there are three perfectly legal options: 1) Give up publishing in Elsevier journals; 2) Give up your research funding; 3) Use your grant money to pay Elsevier's Open Access Fee (about $2400USD).

Another option is to not fully comply with one or the other.  You could post a preprint version of your article and hope NSERC doesn't notice or you could post the accepted version of your article and hope that Elsevier doesn't notice.

Elsevier author agreement: http://goo.gl/lDZBp2

Tri-Agency open access policy: http://goo.gl/pcsa1v
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By the way, if you put your preprint on arXiv, then you can simply submit it to a journal by indicating its arXiv id.
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Pat Morin

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Government-controlled website blocking in Canada (or at least Quebec).

The short version: ISPs now have to block gambling websites (from a list provided by Loto- Québec). Why? So people are forced to use Loto-Québec's own gambling websites.
 
With little fanfare, Quebec passed website blocking legislation last week. Bill 74 took effect on May 18th, setting up a likely court showdown between the Quebec and federal governments. As discussed in several articles and posts over the past year (here…
With little fanfare, Quebec passed website blocking legislation last week. Bill 74 took effect on May 18th, setting up a likely court showdown between the Quebec and federal governments. As discussed in several articles and posts over the past year (here and here), Quebec's Internet blocking legislation requires Internet service providers to block access to a list of online gambling sites to be identified by the government-backed Loto-Québec. The...
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Indeed. I wonder if there's any way to obtain the forbidden list that they will distribute to ISPs.
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A nice discussion of one of my favorite off-campus tools as well as the perverse economics of academic research publishing.
 
The Book Thief

Access to information is an essential component of research. As with much else in market-driven societies, ability, aptitude, and need are highly uncorrolated with means. And in a world with a Web whose original intent was to facilitate the exchange of scientific research, data, papers, and other communications, commercial and legal barriers are increasingly thrown up against just this.

Though there's a countercurrent. The Open Content world is flourishing, and there are journals and publications (PLOS, PNAS, Arxiv) which make publications available. There's a vast collection of public-domain or otherwise freely-available content through The Internet Archive, Project Gutenberg, and many smaller archives.

But the vast bulk of academic publishing is held hostage by a handful of firms with obscene profit margins -- an obscenity which was revealed in a 1970 landmark legal article by a young Stephen Breyer, now associate justice on the Supreme Court of the United States. I'd share a link to that article, but it too is locked up behind a copyright paywall, 46 years after it was initially published. Irony and $2.50 might get you a cup of coffee.

There's more I'd like to say -- this is just top-of-my-head ranting. Truth is I'm a book thief too, and use Sci-Hub, BookXX, Reddit's /r/scholar, and other tools, as well as the limited, fractured, and annoyingly cumbersome access provided me through a handful of library affiliations -- these systems are bad enough that it's often simply easier to drop a DOI into SciHub to get the content directly.

We've got Big Problems to solve. I'm trying to do what I can to solve, or at least understand, a few of them. There are more people out there in the world who could do likewise.

Let's free our data access.

And let's also address the other side of the coin. To admit, as CUNY's Graduate Center holds, that knowledge is a public good. And that the flipside of free access is common support for those who create data, scientific articles, and relevant journalism -- all fields the so-called free market has proven utterly incapable of satisfying, for well-understood reasons. Information isn't a market good, information is a market requirement. Phil Hunt and Richard M Stallman are among those who've proposed a broad-based tax-support structure for content, which I'd discovered as prior art after having made my own modest proposal. Path dependencies are a bitch, which is to say, getting there from here isn't a clearly-defined route, but we've really got to start attacking this. I'm inclined to include not just nonfiction works, but works of entertainment and culture under this model as well.

Meanwhile, thanks to Alexandra Elbakyan, who wears the honor, Book Thief.
How one researcher created a pirate bay for science more powerful than even libraries at top universities.
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The other day, I stayed home with my sick 5 year old daughter. One of the many things we did that day was to make this PDF and play many games of 8x8 hex. (Sorry about the picture—stupid Google+)
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I do not believe in people who claim they are pure. It is not by looking around but to feel your life throughly. As you have seen, I have won another game. Harmony of words keep me alive. I hate people who speak the other side. Voices from the utter side of hell. What ever you call, that's not fair. I do not know how idiosyncratic you are, but you seem plausible. As you have seen, I have won the game. I have replied this in the past. Powerful people usually get silent. Everything is fine with me!
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I bought this yesterday and installed it in our laundry room. While using it for the first time I realized I haven't used one of these in over 20 years. It felt great.
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Ah - the "laundry room" comment threw me off :)
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Wow. What a story, and beautifully told.
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What do you do with a first-year undergraduate who's interested in research? I've tried lots of things over the years, but I think the most rewarding experience (for both of us) was to put together a submission for the Graph Drawing Contest. There's lots of opportunity to learn and experiment without the all-or-nothing gamble associated with working on a theory problem (and without the soul-crushing referee reports you're likely to get on a paper).

Thanks to the contest organizers, Philipp Kindermann, +Maarten Löffler, +Lev Nachmanson, and +Ignaz Rutter,  for putting together a great set of topics this year.
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Education
  • Carleton University
    Computer Science, 1991 - 2001
  • cite etudiante de la haute gatineau
  • carleton university
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  • Carleton University
    Professor, 2013 - present
  • carleton university
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