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Mark Lewis
12,034 followers -
Professor of Computer Science. Author of Scala textbooks. Ring dynamicist, coder, avid roller skater.
Professor of Computer Science. Author of Scala textbooks. Ring dynamicist, coder, avid roller skater.

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Since my house is south facing, my HOA threw up serious road blocks for me getting traditional solar panels. Some of what they did was on the borderline of illegal since the HOA agreement contains wording that conflicts with current state law. My hope is that this wouldn't face so much resistance as it looks like a normal roof. On the other hand, it might not be the right color and given how anal the HOA is ...

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Mnuchin is clearly out of touch with reality. This article has a link to a nice poll of 140 people who work in AI and industry who express very different ideas. There is a nice link to that full poll. There is only one slide in there that really surprises me, and that is the one on the impact automation will have on inequality. That group appears to think that this will reduce inequality, but I don't see how that is possible given that they also seem to think that a large number of people are going to lose their jobs by 2030 and that the remaining jobs are going to require significantly more education and skill. Are they just ignoring the masses of people who are removed from the workforce to come to that conclusion?

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I wish that this article had a lot more details. It is interesting that there is such a big difference between the US and Japan in this analysis. The idea that automation is 50-100 years away from replacing these jobs though is silly. Clearly Mnuchin hasn't been to any of the food establishments that have customers order food on touch screens. Nor has he talked to a robotic customer service machine on the phone. This process is already happening. The displacement of uneducated men and their dissatisfaction with their place in the modern US is a big part of why Trump got into office with his false pledges to get those people back into "good" jobs.

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Scala has been on the top of the highest paid technology list for the US for a number of years now. Last year they included frameworks and the top two technologies with Scala and Spark. This year they didn't include frameworks in the salary analysis and Go has pulled into a tie with Scala.

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A nice survey of jobs that could be impacted with automation in the foreseeable future.

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This is really awesome. It would be interesting to see it with a number of different people who have different proficiency at catching balls. The article reminds me of the Marc Andreessen quote where he said, "The spread of computers and the internet will put jobs in two categories: people who tell computers what to do, and people who are told by computers what to do." It goes beyond jobs. At a certain level, we are all being told what to do by computers today. The only question is whether we have the ability to talk back in an effective manner.

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Here's a good read. I have an old friend whom I debate a lot with on these issues. In one of our recent exchanges he mentioned "lost generations". That is the first time I have heard him mention that, and I'm glad to see him coming around to realizing that a lot of people are going to be displaced who won't get back into the job market. Of course, he said that their kids will train for the new jobs. Fine, let's assume that it true. How long are those kids going to stay in school to do that training? Whose going to pay for it?

I don't know exactly when people think the last "lost generation" was in the US. The big switch of the past that stands out to me was ~100 years ago when we went from a country of farmers to a country of factory workers. The farmers had generally gone through only a few years of formal education. Their kids had to stay in for several more years. This process has continued until today when most of the people who are in demand are going to 16+ years of formal education. So how many years is the young kids of the displaced truck driver going to need to spend in education before they can productively join the work force 10-15 years from now when his father's job completely disappears? Maybe 20 years of education? Of course, technology will be improving that whole time so the goal lines are going to be moving even as the kids give chase. As they strive to learn skills that will get them employed, other people will be striving to automate the things that most use those skills.

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This is a very interesting analysis. Of course, what it ignores is that the matrix changes over time. It has too. Several of the languages on it, including Go, haven't been around all that long. In the specific case of Go, I feel that at some point they are going to have to add in generic types, and when that happens the language will be a lot less simple. Given that simplicity is a big draw for the language, that will be an issue.

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Early on I feared that this might just be about Bill Gates's proposal, but it has more to it than that. I'm interested in seeing more about the UBD idea presented near the end.

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