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Peter Quinton
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16,662 followers
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Awash

There is no bridge between Australia and New Zealand. Just the ocean and the sky. And sometimes you cannot tell which is which.

Image: the HMS Bramble at sea, a 10 gun survey Schooner, tender to the HMS Fly. Out of Port Jackson (Sydney) bound for Wellington (New Ulster Province, New Zealand) March 1851.
Scratch build, to help visualize the journey.

Extract from Beth, a new story i am working on :)
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King Parrot, the old volcano Palerang
'Red' has arrived for the plum blossom, with the rest of his tribe.
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Black-shouldered Kite, Richlands
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Echidna, Mount Fairy
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Mares Forest Canyon Wombeyan Karst Conservation Area

Mares Forest Canyon is a wet limestone canyon normally full of small waterfalls. It is a fun, swimable, wild place. Even in drought, there remain pools of water in the canyon: crystal clear, deceptively deep and cold. However, both the larger Wombeyan Falls and the numerous smaller falls into the canyon are sleeping.

In winter and early spring, it is best to look at the cold water from a distance. Here the vantage point is the Tinted Cave, itself carved by an underground waterfall.

Image, today, inside the Tinted Cave, looking down onto the Mares Forest Canyon. A single handheld shot.

Note: Ok, not everyone will find this a fun canyon to swim. A wet suit and river shoes are recommended. There are three long cold pools to traverse and lots of rocks to climb over. You will encounter poisonous snakes.
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Grove Creek Falls Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve

Base of the falls (70m, 210') after a recent downpour.

Grove Creek takes it's name from the occassional small sandy groves along its path, populated by casuarina trees. The casuarina tree has needle like leaves and indifferent wood. But it has two special powers. Firstly, it stops bush fires. The touch of fire will also kill the tree, but another will grow quickly. Secondly, it can sing. If you sit in one of these groves, and hear a breeze in the casuarinas, you may not be able to leave.

East Australia is in the grip of a drought (hence, few waterfall pictures for a while). This area is usually dry but has received good rain.

(Poorly signposted, it is worth getting directions to the fall and vantage points from the Abercrombie Cave House.)

Image: this week, a single 1/60 zoomed image, toned slightly for structure.
In comments i have posted a second image with a slightly different treatment. The second image is a HDR of three 1/60 burst images. In the processing, i have selected zero deghosting, which has left a more definite pattern of the water structure without the type of full blur that comes from a long exposure. For the post image, i have processed just one of the burst images. Burst shots can extend processing options when developing the final image.

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Sole Boomer

A solitary very large male feasts along Wrens Nest Creek after a downpour of rain. There are no females in sight. This and the scars on this fellow (particularly the rips on his ears) mean he has been kicked out of the tribe.
They grow powerful big in the rough mountains of the Abercrombie.
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Grove Creek Falls Abercrombie Karst Conservation Reserve

This 70m (210') fall carves an impressive cave system before tumbling down to the Abercrombie River. You can still find gold flecks in the creek and one of the old prospectors walking the hills will tell that the first miners into the area found a waterfall faced with the precious metal.

East Australia is in the grip of a drought (hence, no waterfall pictures) but, against the odds, this usually dry area has received a good downpour.

(Poorly signposted, it is worth getting directions to the fall and vantage points from the Abercrombie Cave House.)

Image: today, 13 handheld images merged, color balanced and toned slightly for structure.
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Fly in Ice

For every colonial settlement that succeeds, a dozen fail.

HMS Fly was a 435-ton 18-gun sloop. It surveyed and visited the Great Barrier Reef and many of the Pacific Islands, including the infamous Pitcairn and Norfolk Islands.

From 1847 to 1851, Captain Oliver commanded the sloop. He was a keen watercolor artist who documented his trips with drawings.

The Fly was sometimes tasked with another British Man of War, the 950-ton 25 gun HMS Havannah commanded by Captain Erskine. Oliver and Erskine delighted in racing their ships when circumstances permitted (and the Fly's standing rigging did not snap). The races were keenly watched from the New Zealand shore.

In late 1850 the two Men of War left the South Island of New Zealand and traveled to the remote southern Auckland Islands to examine attempts by the British adventurer Enderby to establish a base deep in the Antarctic Ocean.

On board, the Fly was His Excellency the Governor-in-Chief, Lady Grey, whose authority over the Auckland Islands had been defeated by Enderby's factors in London a couple of years earlier. Enderby was threatening to trade directly with Hobart or, worse, Sydney.

At first, the Fly and the Havannah were forced back by mountainous seas and ice, but they returned shortly afterward making a rough five day passage when the weather started to calm. The two ships arrived at the icy islands in late November and explored the region for a week before returning to New Zealand. During their time at the islands, they noted buildings being constructed at Enderby's settlement 'Hardwicke' at Port Ross. Captain Oliver noted the presence of an unnamed cutter from Sydney and a climate of unhappiness with Enderby. Onshore, work was progressing constructing the settlement its own ship, from pre-formed frames and timber.

The two Men of War returned to patrol the area a couple of months later. This time they made the passage to the Auckland Islands in less than three days. In December 1851 they returned to England, the Havannah with a winning margin of three days.

In the bitter cold, the settlement of Hardwicke failed after only two years. The Auckland Islands are now uninhabited.


Extract from Beth, a new story on which i am working.

Image: Launch from the era (under construction), against a real-time image of the permanent Antarctic storms
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The Hydrographer's Memorandum

In the event of any unfortunate accident happening to yourself, ensure your second sees these orders.

Trifling as it may appear, the love of giving a multiplicity of new and unmeaningful names tends to confuse our geographical knowledge. The name stamped upon a place by the first discoverer should be held sacred by the common consent of all nations; and in new discoveries it would be far more beneficial to make the name convey some idea of the nature of the place; or if it be inhabited, to adopt the native appellation, than to exhaust the catalogue of public characters or private friends at home.

Extract from Beth, a new story i am working on :)

Instruction taken from orders of the Commissioners executing the office of the Lord High Admiral and the Hydorgrapher's memorandum c 1830.
Image: Launch from the era (under construction)

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