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Fergal Daly
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The technology to do this is getting 'cooler' and more commercial. As the article says, this isn't a new idea. I learned of it in 2014 in this IEEE Spectrum article [ http://spectrum.ieee.org/tech-talk/green-tech/solar/passive-radiators-cool-by-sending-heat-straight-to-outer-space ]. "Ronggui Yang and Xiaobo Yin of the University of Colorado, in Boulder [...] have invented a film that can cool buildings without the use of refrigerants and, remarkably, without drawing any power to do so. Better yet, this film can be made using standard roll-to-roll manufacturing methods at a cost of around 50 cents a square metre.

The new film works by a process called radiative cooling. This takes advantage of that fact that Earth’s atmosphere allows certain wavelengths of heat-carrying infrared radiation to escape into space unimpeded. Convert unwanted heat into infrared of the correct wavelength, then, and you can dump it into the cosmos with no come back.
[...]
That cooling effect, 93 watts per square metre in direct sunlight, and more at night, is potent. The team estimates that 20 square metres of their film, placed atop an average American house, would be enough to keep the internal temperature at 20°C on a day when it was 37°C outside."

+David Grigg

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Tokyo sky last night was amazing.

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"""
We're the worlds biggest emigrants, and a fine history of Terrorism too. If we were brown we'd be fucked altogether.
"""

h/t +Kevin Lyda

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Very long article about the very dark side of investor-state dispute settlement clauses in treaties like TTIP and CETA. It will make your blood boil.

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Dylan Moran is in great form here.

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What could have been: Theft from the Public Domain in the Year 2017

From literature, the following books, published in 1960, would now be public domain:

Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird
John Updike, Rabbit, Run
Joy Adamson, Born Free: A Lioness of Two Worlds
William L. Shirer, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich: A History of Nazi Germany
Friedrich A. Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty
Daniel Bell, The End of Ideology: On the Exhaustion of Political Ideas in the Fifties
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., The Politics of Upheaval: The Age of Roosevelt
Dr. Seuss, Green Eggs and Ham and One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish
Scott O’Dell, Island of the Blue Dolphins
John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor
Jean-Paul Sartre, Critique de la raison dialectique

More from film and science.

Oh, and don't forget, it's not just 1960:

[T]hese examples from 1960 are only the tip of the iceberg. If the pre-1978 laws were still in effect, we could have seen 85% of the works published in 1988 enter the public domain on January 1, 2017. Imagine what that would mean to our archives, our libraries, our schools and our culture. Such works could be digitized, preserved, and made available for education, for research, for future creators. Instead, they will remain under copyright for decades to come, perhaps even into the next century.

To clarify, that means that 85% of all works published in the 28 years from 1960 through 1988 would now be public domain.

That's theft. By some dirty rat.


https://web.law.duke.edu/cspd/publicdomainday/2017/pre-1976

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Nice view, spoiled slightly by the verbing nouning designating sign.
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A delightful break from the depressing topics of this year.

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My favourite picture of Sean. He's not a fan of being told to sit still for a photo.
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