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Dhruv Arts
25 followers -
Celebrating Indian Classical and Contemporary music for over 10 years
Celebrating Indian Classical and Contemporary music for over 10 years

25 followers
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A very rare treat! A beautiful song on Lord Rama by Abdul Karim Khan
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Check out ritvik and Ruchira going off the tangent in a bid to avoid practice arpeggios and scales!!
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A note - By Jyotsna Srikanth.

It was shockingly unpleasant news that I woke up to brought me to a total standstill, when I heard the news of Mandolin Shrinivas passing away. While the sad news hadn’t still sunk into the outer layers of my brain, memories of his extremely brilliant raga Kanakangi started flowering in my head.
My mind restlessly wandered in the long passages of the last three decades in which I had 30 odd opportunities to interact with him, listen to him – while my emotional side was stuck with the baby face, a 9 year old Shrinivas churning out endless sequences of extremely creative, highly difficult unimaginable passages of one of the toughest of ragas. The self-taught child prodigy’s fire-brand Kanakangi took me by total surprise and I knew for sure – that he would grow up to be an extraordinary musician.
As a child myself, I was a big fan of his melodic experiments. Given a choice between Mandolin Shrinivas’ concert and a vacation, I used to choose his concert! I was quite awestruck when I first saw his nimble fingers speeding over the modified fretless fingerboard of the western instrument.
His name became synonymous with the instrument. He modified the small fretted instrument into a 5 stringed non-fretted instrument to help him produce the best of the gamakas or glissando playing of Indian classical music. His music appealed both to musicians, non-musicians and the masses.
Shrinivas revolutionized South Indian classical music by delivering the rarest of ragas with complicated grammar with total comfort and with his signature smile on the face. He made it appear so easy; I would return from the concert and try these nuances; hearing him was equal to giga-bytes of parental advice to practice music. Colourful and yet rare ragas like Jingla, Bindumalini, Malavi were taken for a detailed treatment in the Carnatic sense of the term.
He stormed the Carnatic classical scene as a small boy with huge repertoire with many unheard ragas.

His contributions are unparalleled; aside the melodic concepts – his rhythmic patterns were aesthetic, mathematical and appealing to purists and others. He gave a new dimension to the concept of porutham, a kind of kalpana swara (rhythmic improvisation) and brought in a new trend of improvisational music. He had a prodigious musical-mathematical brain. Can’t forget those years, those cassettes era; where you would rewind a few dozen times to understand the concepts of his calculations, which is so central to Carnatic music genre. In 1980s, I would record select live concerts in an audio-cassette recorder to then replay and practice.
Of the many concerts I had the privilege to attend in my early years; I specifically remember one concert of Shrinivas’ with Mysore Nagaraj on the violin and Vellore Ramabhadran on the mridangam in Malleshwaram Sangeetha Sabha which changed my perception about Carnatic music and drew me closer in to its folds. In his concerts notes would be transformed into three dimensional dancing objects. Its funny how the organisers had a no-recording policy and I tried my luck, kept the cassette recorder in a lunch box and took it inside. Even todaty I listen to this particular recording. In this concert he played a memorable Ragam Tanam Pallavi in the raga Bindumalini. Tears poured from nearly every music connoisseur’s eyes in that concert around me.
One couldn't imagine a child performing to such high standards.
His recent inclusion in the popular group Shakthi brought in a fresh lease of life to the group. He was adept in collaborating with the greatest of world musicians and fuse his music with theirs.

Shrinivas was a very compassionate human being. Fame and stardom never stuck his head. He was a down to earth person. Its very rare to see a big star without any whims and fancies.
I knew him and his father. They lived a very simple life. They had to face an array of difficulties to come from a village Palakol in Andhra Pradesh to a city like Chennai where the giants in Carnatic music were in full form, settle down and create a big name for himself.
As the artistic director of London International Arts Festival, I was working to invite him to our festival and was in talks with him to perform at the festival, next year.
His sudden demise is definitely a huge loss to Indian classical music. Its very difficult to find a replacement to mandolin Shrinivas. I hope his brother Rajesh and student Mandolin Raju will carry his legacy. May his soul rest in peace, I wish that he will be again reborn as an other mandolin Shrinivas!

His music was pure and divine.


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Jyotsna now live Richmix
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Aradhana 2013 photos
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Aradhana
17 Photos - View album
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Vishaka Hari's concert March 2014 in East and West London
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Meet Dhruv - recent events
13 Photos - View album
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Dhruv Arts logo depicting intergenerational and intercultural links
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Dhruv Arts presents 

Vishaka Hari 

in a Harikatha (Musical Discourse) on 22nd & 23rd March, 2014.

Experience the ecstatic mix of spirituality,music and talk. 

West London: 'Bhaktha Hanuman' in English will be presented on 22nd March 2014 at 6.00 pm at Canons High School, Shaldon Road, Edgware HA8 6AN

East London: 'Subramanya (Murugan) Vaibhavam' in Tamil will be presented on 23rd March 2014 at 5:00pm at 
Isaac Newton Academy 1 Cricklefield Place, Ilford IG1 1FY

Accompanists:
Dr. Jyotsna Srikanth - violin 
RN Prakash - mridangam
RR Prakash - Ghatam
Sithamparanathan - morsing
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Dhruv Arts presents 

Vishaka Hari 

in a Harikatha (Musical Discourse) on 22nd & 23rd March, 2014.

Experience the ecstatic mix of spirituality,music and talk. 

West London: 'Bhaktha Hanuman' in English will be presented on 22nd March 2014 at 6.00 pm at Canons High School, Shaldon Road, Edgware HA8 6AN

East London: 'Subramanya (Murugan) Vaibhavam' in Tamil will be presented on 23rd March 2014 at 5:00pm at 
Isaac Newton Academy 1 Cricklefield Place, Ilford IG1 1FY

Accompanists:
Dr. Jyotsna Srikanth - violin 
RN Prakash - mridangam
RR Prakash - Ghatam
Sithamparanathan - morsing
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