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Abacus Architects
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Abacus Architects's posts

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Build your dream in 2015: Here are 4 reasons to hire an #architect! http://goo.gl/dGVXST

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Why should you hire an #architect ? Here are 5 great reasons! #blog  http://goo.gl/bpMGUH

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Is it possible the we're replacing history with style? Look at our latest #architecture #blog! http://goo.gl/gUXhPK

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In our latest #blog we have the 8 top #architecture designs in Birmingham! These are beautiful! http://goo.gl/Llcus2

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#Architects are important to most design and build projects, but why should you hire one? We explain this and more in our latest #bloghttp://goo.gl/kzoFlv

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How did bus shelters in #Austria  makes headlines with their #architecture ? Read here in our latest #bloghttp://goo.gl/iUaMZp

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We're now on +Pinterest! Please visit us and view our projects! http://goo.gl/DxjLjP

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AZPML, the architects behind New Street Stations redesign, have stepped down. Read our  #blog  for more: http://goo.gl/EV3CYI

Birmingham canals and architecture are an extremely important part of Birmingham's history - without it, our city would not be anywhere near as important as it is today. Gas Street was the first street in the city have gas lighting, hence the rather unsexy name.

In 1800, Birmingham was the hub of the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the centre of England's canal network which stretched from Liverpool to London.

There are few raw materials in Birmingham so they were shipped in on the canal and used in factories here. Coal from the Black Country was used in the furnaces of the metal industry. Just above the tunnel, on Broad Street, there was a factory making brass items. The building is still there now - it's now a pub called The Brasshouse. Gas Street Basin would have been buzzing with constant activity, day and night, as cargoes were loaded and unloaded.

In the 1830s, railways opened and competed for business with the canals. By 1960s, road transport and rail was quicker (and therefore cheaper) than the canals and they stopped being used by businesses. Cadbury's in Bournville were one of the last local businesses to stop using the canals. Their fleet of boats only stopped transporting their products in the 1960s. The canal area then became run down, the dirty water lined with derelict warehouses.

However, today Birmingham's canals are buzzing with life again. The historic canals sit comfortably next to Broad Street, one of the city's busiest entertainment areas. You can take a canal boat tour, have your dinner on a boat or sit outside a pub on the canalside.

The bridge itself is an architectural imposter - it's not an original one! It was made recently using the original Horseley Ironworks design, just like the other footbridges in Birmingham. It links Gas Street with the Worcester Bar. The basin used to link the 'Worcester & Birmingham Canal' to the 'Birmingham Canal Main Line'. 
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