Profile

Cover photo
Dharma Satyaki
42,304 views
AboutPosts

Stream

Dharma Satyaki

Discussion  - 
 
"Recent laser surveys have revealed traces of a vast urban settlement, comparable in size to Los Angeles, around the temples of Angkor in the Cambodian jungle. The ancient Khmer capital was never lost … it just got a bit overgrown"
6
2
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Discussion  - 
 
Archaeologists have discovered fields of earthen mounds shaped into domes and spirals in 1,000-year-old Cambodian cities.
14
4
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Good news - part 2

In 2008, a Canadian student named Christopher Charles was working in rural Cambodia. He was living in a typical Cambodian house - a house up on stilts to deal with the rainy season. He had no electricity or running water, but lots time to sit around and think.

He started thinking about anemia.

Anemia is often caused by an iron deficiency. It makes you tired and weak. It makes you have trouble thinking clearly. Almost half of Cambodia's population suffers from this disease! In fact, over 3.5 billion people on our planet have anemia, and the World Bank estimates that it's a $50 billion drain on the global GDP.

You can cure anemia with iron supplements - but they taste bad, and they often cause stomach pains, constipation, and even more disgusting problems.

So Charles had another idea: give villagers little blocks of iron to drop into their cooking pots. The iron gets released slowly as the water boils.

But at first, people hated them. They thought the iron blocks where ugly. They thought the iron blocks would scratch their pots. So they turned them into doorstops.

He kept trying. Eventually he came up with a second idea, that could make the first idea work.

He realized that in rural Cambodia almost everything revolves around fish. People earn money fishing, they're a big part of the Khmer diet and their folklore. Even their currency — the riel — is named after a fish!

So, he made iron into "lucky fish" , shown here. And people are now happy to put one into the pot when cooking.

One of those who has been using the fish is Sot Mot, a 60-year-old grandmother who lives just outside Phnom Penh. She drops the fish into boiling water as she chops up garlic, ginger and lemongrass for Khmer chicken soup. "Before, I felt tired and lazy and my chest shook when I was tired," she says. "But after I use the fish, I have strength and energy to work and I sleep well, too."

One of her grand-daughters seems to be improving, too.
"Before, when I went to school I felt tired, and I didn't do well at math, maybe the sixth in the class," says 15-year-old Danai. "Now," she says proudly, "I'm No. 1."

Of course, this idea needs to be tested with scientific studies. And here's one such study:

• Christopher V. Charles et al, Iron-deficiency anaemia in rural Cambodia: community trial of a novel iron supplementation technique, http://eurpub.oxfordjournals.org/content/21/1/43

More studies are coming up.

No matter what the result finally is, it shows that paying attention to local culture can work wonders when trying to help people.

Large parts of this story are paraphrased from the following radio show, which is definitely worth listening to:

• Michael Sullivan, In Cambodia, 'lucky' iron fish in the pot could help fight anemia, http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/12/25/434942455/in-cambodia-lucky-iron-fish-for-the-cooking-pot-could-fight-anemia
28 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
You can now add "visualizing astrophysical simulations" to the long list of cool uses for Blender.
Astroblend creator Jill Naiman shares how she uses Blender to visualize astrophysical simulations and data.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
These Portraits of Auto Mechanics Are a Homage to Renaissance Paintings
Photographer Freddy Fabris spent years wanting to pay homage to the legendary artworks of great Renaissance master painters, but figuring out how to do so
3 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
ENHANCE!
Abstract. Methods for super-resolution (SR) can be broadly classified into two families of methods: (i) The classical multi-image super-resolution (combining images obtained at subpixel misalignments), and (ii) Example-Based super-resolution (learning correspondence between low and high ...
6 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Shared publicly  - 
 
List of open source games and game-related projects that can be found on GitHub: https://github.com/leereilly/games
:video_game: A list of popular/awesome videos games, add-ons, maps, etc. hosted on GitHub. Any genre. Any platform. Any engine.
1
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Discussion  - 
 
A 1,000-year-old model of a stupa holding a bone that inscriptions say belongs to the Buddha has been discovered in a Buddhist temple crypt.
24
4
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Interested in Open Source games/frameworks on GitHub? See this awesome curated list by the Internet's Lee Reilly - https://github.com/leereilly/games
:video_game: A list of popular/awesome videos games, add-ons, maps, etc. hosted on GitHub. Any genre. Any platform. Any engine.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Interior architecture: Apartment - A gorgeous series of interior renders by Julioras. Hi, here is one of my free time artwork recently, hope you will like it. critiques and comment are welcome. Softwares: Blender, Cycles Render, Photshop The post Interior architecture: Apartment appeared first on BlenderNation.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Dharma Satyaki

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
The oldest one

This is a tarsier, filmed by Michael Bowers. There are several kinds of tarsiers.  All of them live in Southeast Asia - mainly the Philippines, Sulawesi, Borneo, and Sumatra.  But tarsiers used to live in many other places too. 

They are, in fact, the oldest known primates that survive today!  Fossils show that they've been around for the past 45 million years.The ancestors of tarsiers branched off from the ancestors of lemurs about 83 million years ago, considerably before the dinosaurs went extinct!

This particular guy is a spectral tarsier.  I guess that 'spectral' here means 'like a ghost, or specter' rather than 'like the colors in a rainbow'.  Probably their eyes look spooky at night when they reflect light.

The spectral tarsier lives on Selayar, an island off the larger island of Sulawesi, in Indonesia.  It's less specialized than some other species of tarsiers: it doesn't have adhesive toes, for example.  Its Latin name is Tarsier spectrum or sometimes Tarsier tarsier, since some consider it the prototype of all tarsiers.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spectral_tarsier

Michael Bowers is here on G+:

https://plus.google.com/u/0/116248116353532955491/posts

#biology  
38 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Links