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Anesthesia Business Consultants, LLC
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The largest physician billing and practice management company specializing exclusively in the practice of anesthesia and pain management.
The largest physician billing and practice management company specializing exclusively in the practice of anesthesia and pain management.

1,363 followers
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Anesthesia Business Consultants, LLC's posts

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We're excited to attend the McDermott Will & Emery's practice management symposium tomorrow! http://ow.ly/MkFP3094AEp
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Hope Is Not a Strategy: A Primer for Anesthesia Groups on Strategic Planning

Will Latham, MBA
President, Latham Consulting Group, Inc., Chattanooga, TN

One of the most important responsibilities of any anesthesia group’s governance is to develop a strategic plan for the group. For some groups this is the role of the Board. In other groups, all shareholders participate in this process.

Unfortunately, it appears that for many groups, “hope” is their strategy.

We are continually surprised to find groups that have never (or rarely) conducted strategic planning retreats on an annual or semi-annual basis. This is especially surprising given:

-Almost all of many physicians’ compensation comes from their group.
-Almost all of many physicians’ clinical work life is associated with their group.
-Moving ahead with significant initiatives requires the collaboration of the members of the group. There is often little that one physician can do by themselves.

And yet, many physicians won’t allocate one day a year for a group planning session.

Why Is Planning Avoided?

Why don’t they? We think there are several reasons:

-Many physicians don’t see the need for strategic planning. They think the group should be able to develop plans at their monthly meetings. They don’t recognize that they typically use those (overly long) monthly meetings to fight day-today fires.
-Many physicians are conflict avoiders. They don’t want planning meetings because they fear that uncontrolled, unproductive conflict will break out.
-The idea of “planning” sounds too business-like, or the term “retreat” sounds too much like Kumbaya.

Read the rest of the article here: http://ow.ly/ZHcw309hSMH

Thoughts? Please comment below.



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Should we use anesthesia on late-term pregnant women and babies under 3 years old? Learn more about this heated debate, courtesy of Becker's ASC! http://ow.ly/MRPi3094A6V
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Have you subscribed to our eAlerts yet? You can get the latest in anesthesiology healthcare news! http://ow.ly/K8Cw3094zIc
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Hospital Drug Diversion Prevention: Strategies for Anesthesiologists, Nurse Anesthetists and Chronic Pain Specialists

SUMMARY: The Drug Enforcement Agency and other agencies are scrutinizing hospitals and healthcare facilities more closely for failure to implement and maintain appropriate drug diversion prevention policies, procedures and programs, and they are holding organizations as well as individuals responsible. As professionals who manage and administer a large number of controlled substances, anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists should take the lead in collaborative, multidisciplinary efforts to prevent drug diversion in their institutions. We present highlights of an effective anesthesiologist-led program developed at Mayo Clinic.
An endoscopy nurse drops syringes of fentanyl into a secret pocket in her uniform top and substitutes them with syringes containing saline.

A radiology technician with hepatitis C diverts unused fentanyl syringes intended for patients and five patients become infected with the virus. One of the patients eventually dies from the infection.

A night custodian rummages through sharps waste containers and consolidates minuscule remaining fentanyl vials for his own use.

Mayo Clinic discovered these incidents of controlled substance diversion at its facilities, but comparable scenarios are playing out in hospitals and healthcare facilities everywhere. Drug diversion contributed to a fourfold increase in substance abuse treatment admissions between 1998 and 2008 among individuals aged 12 and older, according to a report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The Office of the Inspector General reports that a bottle of 30 mg oxycodone tablets is trafficked at a price of $1,100-$2,400, up to 12 times the normal price of a legally filled prescription.

The potential for drug diversion by clinicians, staff, patients, family members and others is a reality at all hospitals, and, as healthcare professionals responsible for managing and administering a large number of controlled substances, anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists have a major role to play in minimizing this potential.

The fact that anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists have an above-average rate of drug addiction, due largely to their occupational proximity to opioids, fuels the need for anesthesia providers to lead initiatives and keep drug diversion prevention in the spotlight in their hospitals, surgical suites and pain clinics.

“All health facilities should have systems in place to deter controlled substance diversion and to promptly identify diversion and intervene when it is occurring,” anesthesiologist Kenneth H. Berge, MD, asserts in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. These systems require multidisciplinary planning and coordination by anesthesia, pharmacy, safety and security, nursing, legal counsel, human resources and other areas.

Read our full eAlert here: http://ow.ly/S7LQ309fFhL

Thoughts? Please comment below.

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"Once you have commitment, you need the discipline and hard work to get you there." Haile Gebrselassie
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Did you know NSAID use during respiratory infections could raise heart attack risk? Learn how these painkillers could affect your heart, courtesy of Pain Medicine News: http://ow.ly/hEPC3094z7s

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The Perioperative Surgical Home: Invest in Good Will

Rick Bushnell, MD, MBA

Director, Department of Anesthesia, Shriners Hospital for Children, Los Angeles, CA and Huntington Memorial Hospital, Pasadena, CA

You trade on it every day. It may be your anesthesia group’s most important asset. It’s difficult to quantify, but in the accounting sense, “good will” is the value of your anesthesia group’s assets above and beyond the tangible assets or the net present value of your group’s future cash flows. For example, good will was a substantial portion of the calculus when Disney purchased the Star Wars franchise. Good will is embodied in your relationship with your hospitals, your surgeons and your patients. You unknowingly groom your good will every single day in order to capitalize your business environment.

In this fifth installment of the Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) series, allow me to posit the PSH as your means of increasing your good will by increasing your value to your hospitals, surgeons and patients. Let us explore the discoveries we’ve made at my institution having initiated pre- and postoperative clinic appointments during this last calendar quarter.

Our PSH clinic targets the 20 percent sickest patients with appointments one week in advance and up to 14 days post-discharge. After initiating clinic appointments with those patients, we quickly noted profound patient gratitude. In most cases, PSH patients already know they are sick and anesthesia is their biggest fear. They’re worried, and our 30- minute appointments result in a relaxed setting where we take the luxury of time to address their concerns. These clinic appointments are the embodiment of true patient access to anesthesiologists. The result is a pool of happier patients and an increased reservoir of community good will toward the entire health system.

Our surgeons also noted their increased access to PSH anesthesiologists. Because of the complexities of anesthesiologist scheduling, often surgeons have no anesthesiologist to consult with concerning complicated patients. Often, the surgeon’s best chance of obtaining an anesthesia consult is three minutes before surgery. Too frequently, the results are canceled cases, frustrated physicians, upset patients and global inefficiency.

On the other hand, the clinic appointment the week before surgery is a fantastic time to partner with surgeons in order to optimize their patients. Surgeons really appreciate a call from the PSH clinic anesthesiologist preparing their next week’s complicated patient.

In your operating room (OR) anesthesia colleagues will similarly appreciate receiving a PSH phone call the night before a complicated surgical patient lands on their lineup. That medical sign-out to your anesthesia colleague doing the case the next day is enormously important to them—a service to their day they have never before experienced. In calling and signing out PSH patients to my colleagues, I am personally gratified by the contribution I can make to their practice—and the feeling is mutual. I have found my OR anesthesia colleagues profoundly grateful for our PSH clearances and sign-outs.

Hospital risk management attorneys are also discovering that the PSH is their new best friend. In our clinic, we conduct full histories and physicals, and place electronic medical record notes that dramatically improve the medicallegal environment.

Read the rest of the article here: http://ow.ly/IlgC309d8DB

Thoughts? Please comment below.

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Do you know about the new GI Procedures for 2017? Learn what Anesthesia Practitioners need to know: http://ow.ly/GGVY3094yAO
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"Nothing ever comes to one, that is worth having, except as a result of hard work." Booker T. Washington
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