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Tim Martin
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We finally made it to Honest Burgers this weekend. They have a trendy "no bookings" policy and the place was packed so we were lucky to get a table, even on a Sunday. They offer GF buns with their burgers, and the burgers and sides are naturally gluten free.

It's the best GF burger in London in my opinion. Does anyone else have other suggestions?
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The general message here is correct, but this is terrible headline writing. To be a "scam" necessitates planning and deliberate fraud that is absent here.

Gluten-free is a food fad, the same as the Atkins diet, that Patrick Holford thing, paleo, raw food, 5:2, no carbs after 5pm, and whatever other pseudo-science waffle will be dreamed up next week. Nobody planned the gluten-free fad, it just happened. Manufacturers are producing gluten-free in all good faith in response to market demand. To claim that higher prices means they are profiteering without any analysis of the economies of scale in addressing a smaller market is just bad journalism.

Meanwhile, the massive inrush of interest followed by the inevitable backlash against it is doing harm to the people with coeliac disease who actually need gluten-free food. Even the bluntest exposé can't ignore the awkward fact that (unlike the majority of food fads) there's a genuine medical issue here.
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I've long been of the opinion that one of the major problems with culture over the last decade has been the confusion of "viral" with "valuable". There's a correlation between the two, but there are hidden variables that are being ignored. In particular, inflammatory and biased content tends to be more viral than well-argued moderate opinion.
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This seems like a pretty good summary of the issues around the David Miranda detainment.
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A good article from Bruce Schneier, though sounding more paranoid than he usually does (perhaps with some justification).

He says:

"Since the Snowden documents became public, I have been receiving e-mails from people seeking advice on whom to trust. As a security and privacy expert, I'm expected to know which companies protect their users' privacy and which encryption programs the NSA can't break. The truth is, I have no idea. No one outside the classified government world does."

I don't think that's completely true. For the NSA, leaning on a service provider to get access has costs: both direct monetary costs and the increased risk of light being thrown on their clandestine activities. These costs don't scale down linearly with the number of users on the service they compromise. Therefore, all other things being equal, you should be more likely to be safe on services that have a small number of users.

Probably this isn't all that useful. Small services either quickly become large services, or they die. Or else they're written on such a shoestring budget that they use commodity components (which may be able to be compromised by the NSA), or they're shoddily implemented, or both.
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An article from +The Economist about the costly criminalisation of the mentally ill in the USA.
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Tim Martin

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A good interview with Tyler Cowen about his new book on the topic of inequality. An interesting comment:

"In the U.S., New York City is probably the most unequal place we’ve got. And I find it striking how many people believe, first, that inequality is terrible, and that this vision for the future is horrible, and, at the same time, think, 'Oh, I love New York City!'"
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I've been using +Spotify since the early days, and I remember that their pitch back then was that it would have less advertising than commercial radio. Not so any more: my last half hour of listening is quite literally: ad, ad, track, track, ad, track, ad, ad, track, ad, track.

Of course, it's a free market and I don't have to use their service. I'd happily pay for a premium account, but with so little of the fee going to the artists (pennies per month, at the rates I listen) I feel it's fairer for me to spend the money purchasing music instead.

I suspect some of the problem is that they don't have the right level of advertising inventory. Playing the exact same ad four or five times to the same person in quick succession can't be worth much, so either the advertiser is getting hosed or (more likely) Spotify is making less than it potentially could be. More inventory would also enable better targeting, which could increase the value.
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This article is arguing that pseudonymity is a good compromise between the high trolling you get if you allow anonymous posting and the stifled expression (particularly for sensitive topics) if you require a real-world identity.

I'm unconvinced. Pseudonymity almost inevitably allows people to create an unlimited number of alternate identities, so they are used and disposed of almost as cheaply as if they were completely anonymous (the article suggests binding them to an email address, which is laughable in a world where people can create an unlimited number of free accounts, or just use Mailinator or the like).

The vast majority of posting on the internet is psuedonymous, not completely anonymous. Reddit has never allowed completely anonymous posts, and is rich in trolls. 4chan and Slashdot have plenty of trolls who choose to use a consistent identity. So did most of the usenet trolls of old. Part of the "fun" of trolling seems to be building up notoriety, which you can't do without a disposable identity.

The Disqus study cited doesn't seem all that useful. Disqus is mostly (AFAIK) used for blog comments, which tend to be drive-by comments (since blog posts tend not to generate long-lived discussion). Also, the study regards a comment as being of higher quality if people respond to it, which is just what happens to effective troll comments (the entire point of trolling is to generate response, so if people aren't responding to you then you're doing it wrong). Finally, if our goal is to reduce trolling then it's not very relevant that pseudonymous commenters produced more quality comments. What we want is less abuse, not more genuine posts mixed in with the abuse. From the piece of the study quoted, I don't see any reason to believe that would happen.
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I just had an email purporting to come from "PayPal Costumer Services". Phishing fail.
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An interesting analysis from an internet retailer of why affiliate marketing didn't work for them (the implication being that a lot of affiliate marketing is a waste of money).
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It was interesting to learn about affiliate marketing, and the pitfalls. Thanks. Andrew Martin
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One of the unintended consequences of court-ordered web site blocking at ISPs: A malicious blocked site can claim an IP address that actually belongs to a popular "legitimate" site, temporarily knocking the latter off the internet for users of the ISP doing the blocking.

If the UK does get the statutory porn filters that David Cameron seems to want, I can't see how this isn't going to degenerate into a costly whitelist approach for ISPs to maintain. The cost of setting up a new domain, putting some objectionable content onto it (so that it gets blocked) and then claiming the IP of any site you want to attack is trivial, and the range of attack targets extends to basically the entire web. No doubt popular sites like the BBC, Facebook etc. will get whitelisted, so that the only sites that "go down" will be less famous. Users can assume that the site is at fault and not their internet connection.

I guess the other alternative is deep packet inspection so that HTTP Host headers can be compared against the blacklist. Maybe now's a good time to invest in companies that make firewalls with very scalable layer-7 blacklist capabilities.
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Tasty pizzas at very reasonable prices. Service was friendly if slightly inefficient. They offer all their pizzas with the option of a gluten free base, which was our main reason for going there. The gluten-free pizza was good and there was no trouble or confusion in ordering it as there sometimes is elsewhere.
Food: Very goodDecor: GoodService: Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
1 review
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