Profile

Cover photo
1,377 followers|1,196,921 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Dahab, on the Eygptian Sinai peninsular in the Red Sea, has some very good diving. It is most famous for its Canyon and Blue Hole dive sites, but it has many others - some arguably better than these the most well known dives. 

The diving in Dahab is mostly shore-based: the sea quickly drops off to great depths. More remote dive sites are reached by boat, or by camel.

The Red Sea is very salty. Its salinity reaches 41 parts per thousand compared to 35 parts per thousand in oceans. This is due to the lack of rivers adding fresh water to the sea, and the hot weather causing evaporation. Make sure you use more lead than you would normally.
Dahab means "Gold", and it was named by the Bedouin for its golden sands. Some divers consider Dahab to be a bit out of the way, but if you like relaxed diving with just short walk into the water, then Dahab is well worth a visit.

Diving generally involves a short drive up or down the coast to a Bedouin cafe where you have a cup of tea before getting changed and walking into the water. After the dive you return to the cafe for lunch.

http://www.scubatravel.co.uk/redsea/dahabdive.html
Photo credit: Tim Nicholson
#scubatravel   #Egypt   #diving  
10
Dahab Rentals's profile photo
 
Beautiful !
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Ocean Bacteria "Pumped-Up" by Dying Plankton
Scientists have discovered a surprising new short-circuit to the biological pump. They found that sinking particles of stressed and dying phytoplankton release chemicals that have a steroid-like effect on marine bacteria feeding on the particles. The chemicals juice up the bacteria’s metabolism causing them to more rapidly convert organic carbon in the particles back into CO2 before they can sink to the deep ocean. 

The ocean has been sucking up heat-trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) building up in our atmosphere – with help from tiny plankton. Like plants on land, these plankton convert CO2 into organic carbon via photosynthesis. But unlike land plants, plankton can sink into the deep ocean, carrying carbon with them. Along the way they decompose when bacteria convert their remains back into CO2.

It’s called the “biological pump,” and if it operated 100 percent efficiently, nearly every atom of carbon drawn into the ocean would be converted to organic carbon, sink into the deep ocean, and remain sequestered from the atmosphere for millennia. But like hail stones that melt before reaching the ground, some carbon never makes it to the deep ocean, allowing CO2 to leak back into the upper ocean and ultimately exchange with the atmosphere.

In a new study published April 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and their colleague from Rutgers University discovered a surprising new short-circuit to the biological pump. They found that sinking particles of stressed and dying phytoplankton release chemicals that have a jolting, steroid-like effect on marine bacteria feeding on the particles. The chemicals juice up the bacteria’s metabolism causing them to more rapidly convert organic carbon in the particles back into CO2 before they can sink to the deep ocean.
http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/ocean-bacteria-pumped-up-by-dying-plankton.html
#plankton     #ocean   #scuba  
2
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
We're on Best at Travel's guide to the Maldive's - thanks guys
http://www.bestattravel.co.uk/guides/guide-to-maldives.aspx
#Maldives  
Photo credit: Tim Nicholson
11
1
anne chan's profile photo
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Bubblewrap keeps jellyfish safe in aquarium
 
Did you know that our crown jellies grew up in a rubber room? Well, sort of. We’re the first ones to ever raise them to adulthood, thanks in part to a unique enclosure that uses common bubble wrap to keep them safe and secure. On exhibit in the Jellies Experience! http://mbayaq.co/1uFLbQ9 
1 comment on original post
10
1
Mariusz Tyburski's profile photoGuy Gagnon's profile photoBalıkadam Eğitim Merkezi's profile photo
2 comments
 
Interesting, thanks!
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
European fish on the move with increasing sea temperature
The world’s seas are getting warmer and the North Sea is one of the world's global warming hotspots. Twenty of these have been identified – areas in which the ocean is warming much more rapidly than the average.

The most important influence on where the fish go is last year's sea surface temperature. 

Warmer waters can increase growth and metabolic rates of the early stages of fish, but it also means the larvae need to eat more – and thus are at greater risk of starvation (the risk of starvation – and indeed being eaten – is already very high for larval fish).  More specifically, it seems that sardines, anchovies and pilchards in particular are moving increasingly more north, occupying the higher temperature environments that are now found there.  

For fishers in the south that target these guys, this shift is bad news. For more northerly fishers who may want to fish sardines, anchovies, and pilchards this shift may be good news.   
http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/european-fish-are-on-the-move-with-increasing-temperature.html
#globalwarming   #environment   #fishing  
   
28
2
Fishing's profile photoBalıkadam Eğitim Merkezi's profile photo
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Kimon K Wreck Photos
The Kimon K, in the Red Sea, has many beautiful soft corals. 

She sank in December 1978, carrying a cargo of lentils. She lies on Shab Abu Nuhas Reef, along with the Ghiannis D, Carnatic and Chrisoula K. 

The dive is good both for all levels of divers. More experienced can penetrate the wreck but there is plenty to see if you would rather remain outside. The top of the wreck is at just 6 m and the lowest part at 32 m. 

Photos by Tim Nicholson
#shipwreck   #redsea   #underwaterphotography  
Read more on Red Sea wrecks at http://www.scubatravel.co.uk/redsea/wreckdive.html
17
3
World Destination news's profile photoCheeKeong Sik's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
1,377 people
Abelardo Alejandro Bazan's profile photo
Contoy Excursions's profile photo
Jaime Plata H.'s profile photo
Divers Direct's profile photo
wonkyeong lee's profile photo
Shannon Adcock's profile photo
Scuba Dive Jamaica's profile photo
Kobanya Mine Diving Budapest's profile photo
Aqua Sport Diving Services's profile photo

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Goodbye to Sunburn
Sunburn can ruin a scuba diving holiday, but you could soon tell when to cover up thanks to an early warning sunburn indicator, developed by Queen’s University Belfast. 
http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/goodbye-to-sunburn.html #scubadiving   #travel   #technology  
Sunburn can ruin a scuba diving holiday, but you could soon tell when to cover up thanks to an early warning sunburn indicator, developed by Queen’s Univer
1
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Steel Net that could Clean Up Oil Spills
Scientists have developed a mesh that captures oil but lets water through. The steel net could help clean oil spills. The work was partly inspired by lotus leaves, whose bumpy surfaces naturally repel water but not oil.
http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/net-cleans-ocean-oil-spills.html
#pollution   #ocean   #environment  
Photo: Deepwater horizon oil spill from space (NASA)
4
1
Toni Brooks's profile photo
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Controversial mine threatens Indonesian dive mecca
According to +The Guardian, activists are taking legal action to try and stop mining on the tiny Indonesian island of Bangka, a hotspot of marine biodiversity in the Coral Triangle. 

Bangka borders a marine park that protects two world famous dive sites, Bunaken and Lembeh, although many divers consider Bangka’s reefs to be just as impressive. 

The seascape here is a global hotspot of marine biodiversity, supporting rare species like pygmy sea horses, leaf fish and dugongs as well as turtles, white tip reef sharks and even whales. But an allegedly illegal mining operation is said to be changing the face of the island and threatening the fertile waters that surround it. 

Under Indonesian law, mining on islands smaller than 2,000 sq km that adversely affects the local environment is prohibited.  

However, a mining company is said to have already caused extensive environmental damage, including coastal excavation and land reclamation near sensitive coral reefs. Yet the company has enjoyed the support of officials at both the local and national level.

More on the diving around Bangka, Bunaken and Lembeh is on our website at http://www.scubatravel.co.uk/indonesia/indodive.html 

You can read the original story in the Guardian at http://www.theguardian.com/environment/the-coral-triangle/2015/apr/03/controversial-mine-threatens-indonesian-dive-mecca
#indonesia   #scuba  
+Blue Bay Divers 
62
5
aisha sayeed's profile photoJill Studholme's profile photokomathy chandrakumar's profile photoJordi Figueras's profile photo
3 comments
 
This screams corruption all over it. Please do your best to preserve what we have left.
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Scientists urge Brazil to take a stand on marine life
A team of Brazilian scientists is calling for immediate fisheries management collaboration between the nation’s public and private sectors. The scientists say Brazil can transform this moment of political turmoil into positive action, and become a leader among developing countries facing widespread extinction of aquatic animals. 

The Galapagos shark in the picture  is an example of a keystone species thought to have been fished to regional extinction due to decades of nonexistent fisheries regulations. This species is one of many that could have greatly benefited from management plans that help reduce by-catch and prevent the overexploitation of fishing stocks.

“In Brazil – a country with some of the most unique aquatic environments on Earth – fisheries data don’t really exist,” says Luiz Rocha, PhD, Associate Curator of Ichthyology at the California Academy of Sciences. “There are no bag or size limits for any species of fish, and for the past few years, even the most basic fisheries statistics – such as the numbers and weights of fish being caught – are a blank space. Maintaining current red lists is crucial to making sure management plans start as soon as possible.” 

http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/scientists-urge-brazilian-government-take-a-stand-on-marine-life-protection.html
#marinelife   #shark  
photo credit: California Academy of Sciences
11
2
Marvin Latva's profile photoBalıkadam Eğitim Merkezi's profile photo
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Seen any old fishing stuff littering the beach or underwater? The World Animal Protection organisation wants you to tell them about it. 

Their map of sightings is at http://www.worldanimalprotection.org/sea-change-map
 
Divers asked to report "ghost" fishing gear
According to the World Animal Protection,  an estimated 640,000 tonnes of fishing gear is lost or abandoned in our oceans each year, entangling and killing millions of animals including seals, turtles and whales. 

Now they are asking people to report any "ghost" fishing gear they see or remove.

Identifying ghost gear hotspots lets volunteers take urgent action wherever sea animals are most at risk. The data will also help demonstrate the most important causes of ghost gear so steps can be taken to reduce its use. 

More at http://news.scubatravel.co.uk/divers-report-ghost-fishing-gear.html
Upload sightings to http://www.worldanimalprotection.org/sea-ghost-gear/add

Photo: Martin Stelfox (CC BY-SA 4.0)
#fishing   #marinelife  
View original post
9
2
Scuba Professionals of Arizona's profile photoRutger Thole's profile photo
Add a comment...

SCUBA Travel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Big oil companies want to drill where most of the world’s narwhals live, in the Canadian Arctic 

The tiny Clyde River community in the Canadian Arctic is under threat: oil companies have been given the green light to start looking for oil in Baffin Bay.

This involves firing deafening explosions through the ocean. The noise from these explosions could be catastrophic for most of the world’s narwhal population, who also call Clyde River home.

The explosions can disrupt narwhals' migration paths and calving areas, cause permanent hearing loss and even lead to death. 

The narwhal, or narwhale (Monodon monoceros) is a toothed whale in the same family as the beluga whale.

https://secure.greenpeace.org.uk/page/speakout/clyde-river
#greenpeace   #marineconservation   #whales  
17
11
hali lewis's profile photoElementals 5647's profile photo
Add a comment...
Story
Tagline
Guide to Scuba Diving around the World
Introduction

Established 2000, SCUBA Travel provides information and reviews on dive sites and dive operators in over 90 countries, from Argentina to West Papua. Browse our list of the best 100 dive sites in the world (how many have you dived?) and read our diving travel articles. We're here to help you plan your next dive trip.

Contact Information
Contact info
Email
Address
5 Loxford Court Hulme Manchester M15 6AF UK