Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Wild Dolphin Foundation
25 followers -
Education, Conservation, Advocacy
Education, Conservation, Advocacy

25 followers
About
Wild Dolphin Foundation's posts

Post has shared content
Using satellite to help save whales from ship strikes etc
NASA satellite data is helping scientists predict the movement of blue whales and other whale species in order to reduce the likelihood of collisions with large ships. Information from satellites about water temperature and plankton concentrations is merged with whale tracking data in a new tool called WhaleWatch being developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service. The project is funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and NASA.

WhaleWatch is an example of how NASA satellite data is being put to work by decision makers around the world 24/7. Learn more: http://1.usa.gov/1INhumd

#EarthRightNow
Photo

Post has shared content
The Race to Save the Vaquita, the World’s Most Endangered Marine Mammal
... Thanks largely to illegal human activity, there are fewer than 100 vaquitas left. Some estimates put the number closer to 50. Experts forecast that with things as they are, the vaquita could die out in just a few years—and it’ll all be down to human causes.
“I really can’t express how critical it is,” said Clare Perry, leader of the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) oceans campaign. “We’re really at last chance saloon, I’m afraid.”
The vaquita is endemic to Mexico’s Gulf of California; you can’t find it anywhere else. Unfortunately for the vaquita, it’s not the only threatened fish in the sea, and while no one goes out to kill the few remaining vaquitas, they’ve found themselves embroiled in the tragedy of another critically endangered endemic species: the totoaba.
Totoaba macdonaldi is a large fish that has seen its population decrease for decades. It’s been illegal to fish the totoaba since 1975, but there’s a strong incentive for people to continue poaching it: the dried swim bladder of a single totoaba can fetch over $10,000 on the black markets in Hong Kong and mainland China.
Read the full story on Vice at http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-race-to-save-the-vaquita-the-worlds-most-endangered-marine-mammal #vaquita #Mexico #China #fishing
Image: Children with a vaquita - a photograph found in a fisherman's home (c) Alejandro Rivas/Greenpeace, via Vice
The Race to Save the Vaquita, the World’s Most Endangered Marine Mammal
... Thanks largely to illegal human activity, there are fewer than 100 vaquitas left. Some estimates put the number closer to 50. Experts forecast that with things as they are, the vaquita could die out in just a few years—and it’ll all be down to human causes.
“I really can’t express how critical it is,” said Clare Perry, leader of the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) oceans campaign. “We’re really at last chance saloon, I’m afraid.”
The vaquita is endemic to Mexico’s Gulf of California; you can’t find it anywhere else. Unfortunately for the vaquita, it’s not the only threatened fish in the sea, and while no one goes out to kill the few remaining vaquitas, they’ve found themselves embroiled in the tragedy of another critically endangered endemic species: the totoaba.
Totoaba macdonaldi is a large fish that has seen its population decrease for decades. It’s been illegal to fish the totoaba since 1975, but there’s a strong incentive for people to continue poaching it: the dried swim bladder of a single totoaba can fetch over $10,000 on the black markets in Hong Kong and mainland China.
Read the full story on Vice at http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-race-to-save-the-vaquita-the-worlds-most-endangered-marine-mammal #vaquita #Mexico #China #fishing
Image: Children with a vaquita - a photograph found in a fisherman's home (c) Alejandro Rivas/Greenpeace, via Vice
Photo

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
The Hydration Hose:
(sharing this again so that folks see why the captive industry does this to the dolphins - Please don't buy a ticket - Captivity Kills)
The kidneys of dolphins and whales are designed for a continual input of fresh prey which also contains water to keep them hydrated. In captivity, the animals are not continually fed and often face periods of fasting; most notably at night when the park is closed. This can cause problems not just because the animals may hunger, but because they begin to dehydrate. Unfortunately, captive dolphins and whales are not given fresh food, but frozen food with very little water content. As a result, the animals are given supplemental hydration. This comes in the form of ice, jello, and the hydration hose.
The procedure is most often performed in the mornings after the animals have fasted through the night, or at least 5 hours after the animal’s last meal. This prevents vomiting. Trainers insert a tube down the animal's throats in order to funnel fresh water directly into the stomach.

Post has shared content
Keep up the great work!

Post has shared content
YoOceans! is dedicated to improving the lives of marine mammals in both captivity and the wild. We provide all the educational materials necessary to fully educate our classes, groups and student led organizations as well as encouraging leadership and advocacy in the community.

Post has shared content
Keep up the great work!

Post has attachment
Merry Christmas to all - finned, furred, feathered or naked... From our pod to yours!
#merrycuteness  
Photo

Post has attachment
Yay! This is how to roll,  with community-based, bay-specific management!

http://phys.org/news/2014-12-policy-action-urgently-hawaii-dolphins.html

Post has attachment
Why dolphins need YOUR help... another genetically distinct species at risk! In photo, a dolphin gravely ill with morbillivirus lies in the surf of the Bahia Honda State Park Beach. The Keys are now part of the outbreak area for the virus, which has killed more than 1,560 bottlenose dolphins from New York to Florida since July 2013.

http://www.keysnet.com/2014/12/19/500336_half-of-keys-dolphins-could-be.html?rh=1
Wait while more posts are being loaded