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Mike Sessler
633 followers -
Christ follower, husband, father, tech director, writer, sound guy, geek, Mac.
Christ follower, husband, father, tech director, writer, sound guy, geek, Mac.

633 followers
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This week we’ve been unpacking some concepts that appeared in a post on another website titled Trend: Lousy Church Sound. As I said Monday, I don’t disagree with much of what that author said. At the same time, I thought it would be helpful to bring some context to it. Monday, we talked about the need for a professional to at least manage the increasingly complex production systems that are being installed in churches today. Wednesday, I proposed that when led well, volunteers can do a bang-up job running even complex systems. Today, I want to dig into the costs of production. 

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This week we’re talking about lousy church sound. I’ve sure heard my share of bad church sound, as I’m sure many of you have. The impetus of this series is an article that originally appeared on Worship Ideas. Last time, we talked about the premise that pro-level sound requires professional operators—something I generally agree with. 

However, the author’s next premise is that volunteers will never be able to run a modern sound console. To wit: 

Churches are discovering the complexities of modern worship. In other words, you can’t have a new mixing console that resembles the cockpit of the space shuttle and expect a volunteer to (ever) be able to get it to work right.

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A few weeks ago I came across an old post at another blog that described a trend, lousy church sound. You can read the post here. I’ll warn you, there are a lot of things going on in that post, and it may take you a few passes through to get a handle on what he’s saying (I’ve read it 5 times and I’m still not 100% sure…).

My intention is not to attack the author of that post, as I believe he makes some good points. He makes some statements that I think are worth unpacking here. As I said, there’s a lot going on there, so it will probably take me a few posts to work through it. I’ve broken the post down to three main prepositions that we’ll tackle one at a time. 

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One of the cool things I get to do is travel around to a lot of churches and conferences each year. Most of the time, I’m just hanging out and talking to people, which I really enjoy. But when the session or service starts, I typically migrate towards FOH to see what’s going on. What I have observed is a somewhat disturbing trend. Now, this may make me sound like an old guy and a Luddite, but I’m really not. OK, I am old, but I’m not a Luddite. But here’s what I’m seeing; with the advent of digital consoles at FOH everywhere, I see a lot of engineers spending a lot of time tweaking plugins, turning on all the compressors or playing with SMAART, but not a lot of time on getting a good mix put together. 

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Here at CTA, we talk a lot about creating a healthy staff culture. Just last week I wrote a post to TD’s encouraging them to do a good job of taking care of themselves. I really believe in that, mainly because sometimes, church staffs are not as healthy as they could be. As I was thinking about this concept, it occurred to me that we also have to be sure to build and maintain a healthy culture for our volunteer teams as well. 

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A few months back, my daughter asked me to mix for her worship leading final. Of course, I said yes immediately. Then I discovered the venue. It was not ideal. That’s being polite. It was a big, hard box with lots of parallel walls, a poorly implemented PA and a mix position outside the coverage are of the speakers. Oh, and FOH was only accessed by a tight spiral staircase. Cool. 

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I have the privilege to know a lot of technical directors. A lot. One thing I’ve noticed about our tribe is that we tend to be really good at taking care of everyone around us, and not so good at taking care of ourselves. And that can be both a good thing and a bad thing. 

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I have the privilege to know a lot of technical directors. A lot. One thing I’ve noticed about our tribe is that we tend to be really good at taking care of everyone around us, and not so good at taking care of ourselves. And that can be both a good thing and a bad thing. 

On the plus side, we tend to be great servants. Those around us trust us to get the job done no matter what. We typically go the extra two miles, even at great personal sacrifice. This is generally good. However, it can also lead to burnout. I know too many people who gave and gave and gave until there was no more left, then simply left the church, never to return (at least not yet). So we really do need to take care of ourselves if we want to do this for the long haul.

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Last time around, we talked about using Cat5 cable to distribute DMX signals. In that implementation, it is really cable replacement. Instead of pulling DMX cable (not mic cable—there is a difference), we pull Cat5 for our backbone distribution runs. Fixture to fixture cables are normal DMX cables. Today, I want to talk a little bit about using Ethernet to distribute DMX. This will be an overview article as there is way too much information to contain in a single post. Also, some of the standards are still evolving, and it’s not always simple, especially when mixing multiple manufacturers. Come to think of it, we need to do a podcast on this…

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As you know, LED lighting is all the rage. But how do you go from a cool idea to a finished project if you want to do something a little out of the box? This week, Nick tells us about a great new resource, ledstriplightideas.com. Some cool stuff will come from this...
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