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Diane Richard
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257 followers
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A reader shares ...

Ancestral Findings has a whole series of E-books by Will Moneymaker, on "Help" subjects for genealogists. https://ancestralfindings.com/ebooks/

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Comment from reader Ernest Thode ...

My maternal grandfather and great-grandfather were "truck farmers" in an array of greenhouses, the largest in the country, in Indianapolis. I have a long panoramic photo about 4 feet long, of their annual family picnic, taken ca 1909.

There is a thorough discussion of these greenhouses and some photos at the Indiana Historical Society. See the description gardeners-benefit-society-of-indianapolis-photographs-1901-1962.pdf at their site, [DLR note -- or, just google on the expression above and you will see the PDF pop up as a result]

I found a photo of "retro Indy" at the Indianapolis Star:

http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/ac7b799af7c86010e36b9f19ccb4612f61a93b67/c=1-0-1851-1391&r=x404&c=534x401/local/-/media/2016/06/24/INGroup/Indianapolis/636023642616147766-greenhouse-1.jpg

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From reader Victoria P. Young ...

I just read your Up Front post about kit homes. My grandparents purchased two Lustron homes in the late 1940s in Pierre, SD. They lived in one (where they raised my dad and his two brothers - a very modest 2 bedroom model) and rented out the other. The house was so very different than anything else I've ever seen! Since everything was enameled metal - no doors or wood of any kind was a part of the house. The interior room dividers were sliding pocket doors!

http://sddigitalarchives.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/photos/id/41586/rec/9

"Porcelain-enameled steel, the same resistant finish found on bathtubs and appliances, covered all surfaces of the Lustron house" My grandparents lived in that home until they moved to a retirement home near my uncle around 2003. Only about 2,000 of these homes survive today.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lustron_house

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Diane Richard commented on a post on Blogger.
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I've been to many libraries, both local - at least five in the Philadelphia area, and five or six trips to the fabulous Family History Library in Utah, but a discovery in the Quaker Meeting minutes held in Swarthmore College (may have become a university since I was there) library is the most memorable. An ancestor in my paternal line was 'read out of meeting' for "farthering (sic) a child out of wedlock." (This was back in the 1700s.} My parents were still alive when I learned that, but there was no way I would have passed that info on. My mother would have bee horrified, to say the least.

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Reader M. Davis shares ...

We have a sugar cookie recipe handed down for years. I thought it was from the Irish side, but it may have been from the Germans I found last years that were 'sugar bakers'. We make it every year for Christmas, although it's getting hard to find the cinnamon decors for them.

I also have two wooden file boxes of recipes - some clipped from product packaging, some hand-written with pencil or pen- probably not fountain pens, given the handwriting, etc. A lot of the older recipes only list the ingredients, not how to mix them together- they were to remind the cook, not tell her what to do.

I made pages for a family recipe book where I copied them front and back on 8x11 paper, about 6 per page depending on their sizes, and put them in notebooks which I sent to my sisters A couple of them were written on the back of pay stubs from the Lehigh Coal Company in Pennsylvnia. These ladies wasted nothing!

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From reader Mary Douglass ...

Curiosity, thinking outside the box, perseverance, and enough knowledge to take advantage of serendipity. J. Mark Lowe is among the greatest genealogists currently in practice. Elizabeth Shown Mills is another.

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Diane Richard commented on a post on Blogger.
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The Cape May County Historical and Genealogical Society was able to obtain at auction a few months ago, a ledger of an early settler. Cape May County was settled in the very late 1600s, and early 1700s. Many of the early settlers were whalers from Long Island.

(FYI, My dad was the first in my male line who was born outside the county since the early 1700s. I am descended from 40 plus of the early settlers. Cape May County is the lower tip of New Jersey, a peninsula, limited options for marriage. You should see that part of my family tree - looks like a spider web.)

Cape May County Museum and Genealogical Library, 504 Route 9 North, Cape May Court House, NJ 08210, http://www.cmcmuseum.org/

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Diane Richard commented on a post on Blogger.
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I'm one of the volunteer genealogists at the Salina Public Library. I take 2 hour-long appointments on the 1st Monday of each month. Another volunteer takes the 3rd Thursday. I lobbied for this program, "The Genealogist is In!" after talking with Barbara Mulvihill, reference librarian for genealogy mentioned she wasn't getting her other work done because of the time it takes to get new genealogists started and on track.

Last Monday I worked with an 80-year-old new genealogist. We decided to focus on paper and pencil genealogy as she doesn't know how to use a computer. She was so tickled to get some census records off Ancestry and tombstone photos off Find-a-grave. She's going to take a lot of TLC!
Mary

Mary Clement Douglass
Transcribing & publishing Kansas genealogical records

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I actually still have feedbag fabric that Mon left at her passing, She never used it, and it's still hale, hearty, and viable for use. One of the pieces has little roosters in red and green all over it. They were already old when I was born in '52.

Anybody else have a stash that includes feedbags?

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Diane Richard commented on a post on Blogger.
As a toddler, I had summer dresses and bonnets made of cotton from chicken feed sacks. We lived next door to a widow who raised chickens and sold their eggs for her income. I got to "help" feed the chickens and gather the eggs. As a special treat, I got to watch the eggs hatch in her incubator. Just one of the blessings of growing up in a really small town.

Mary
Mary Clement Douglass
Transcribing & publishing Kansas genealogical records
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