Vocabulary  - 
 
When I see the word "free", I'm tempted to think that I can do something freely and as I wish. So when I see "smoke-free", I mistakenly think for an instance that smoking is allowed there (I don't smoke, though). Are there anyone who tend to think like thst? 
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A good point. In the English language, many words have multiple meanings. Free does mean free to do as you wish. But it is also used to suggest that a place is free of something. In this example, free of smoke. You are most likely to see this phrase as 'smoke-free zone.' As the word free comes after the verb to smoke, it suggests this zone is free of smoke. Turn it around and say 'Free-smoking zone.' As the word free comes before the verb, it suggests that you are free to smoke. Hope this helps :)
 
I think SMOKE-FREE refers to a space free FROM smoke rather to free TO SMOKE. SMOKE USED AS A NOUN AND NOT AS A VERB. =))
 
+James Jewell Thank you for the tips. Actually, I've seen a sign saying "smoke-free zone", but I didn't know that there may be a sign saying "free-smoking zone", which means you can smoke. I'll try to keep these phrases in mind but I can be confused. Thank goodness I'm not a smoker.   
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