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A NOAA model of Earth's climate has been commemorated in an international stamp issued by the U.S. Postal Service in celebration of Earth Day 2014.

"The round stamp depicts the globe with North America in the center, surrounded by vivid bands of blue, green and red, signifying the varying temperatures of sea surface waters."
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Solar Gusher

An active region blew out a flare (bright flash) and a dark rush of plasma spewing above the Sun (Apr. 4, 2104).  The semi-transparent plasma then seemed to turn and shift in flat planes. Some of the particles went roaring into space, while at least some of them were seen falling back into the Sun. The video, shown in two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, covers 4 hours of activity. 

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA.  

More from the Solar Dynamics Observatory at sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/
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Erica Awbrey Murray's profile photoMidge Pollard's profile photoLance INTJ's profile photointergalactical dustman's profile photo
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More planets
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Join NOAA coral reef specialists and the American Museum of Natural History’s Science Bulletins program to explore how reefs are responding to warming oceans—and how they may fare in the future.

The Hangout will release a new data visualization based on NOAA satellite monitoring of global reefs and recent forecasts of future impacts. The researchers behind the data will discuss the science and answer your questions:

• Dr. Mark Eakin Coordinator of NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch program
• Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk Assistant scientist with NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory and the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami

Science Bulletins editorial producer Laura Allen will moderate. 

The data visualization is designed for informal education at museums and science centers. A version is also available for NOAA’s Science on a Sphere (SOS)® spherical display system at http://sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=451. The Hangout panel will also address ways to interpret the visualization for educational audiences.

This visualization and professional development training is supported by NOAA.
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Science Bulletins at AMNH. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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Join NOAA coral reef specialists and the American Museum of Natural History’s Science Bulletins program to explore how reefs are responding to warming oceans—and how they may fare in the future.

The Hangout will release a new data visualization based on NOAA satellite monitoring of global reefs and recent forecasts of future impacts. The researchers behind the data will discuss the science and answer your questions:

Dr. Mark Eakin Coordinator of NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch program
Dr. Ruben van Hooidonk Assistant scientist with NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory and the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies at the University of Miami

Science Bulletins editorial producer Laura Allen will moderate. 

The data visualization is designed for informal education at museums and science centers. A version is also available for NOAA’s Science on a Sphere (SOS)® spherical display system at http://sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=451. The Hangout panel will also address ways to interpret the visualization for educational audiences.

This visualization and professional development training is supported by NOAA.
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Science Bulletins at AMNH's profile photoHarmony Hancock's profile photoRobert Dodd's profile photoPat Gunn's profile photo
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Unfortunately we weren't able to figure it out what was going on at first and joined too late. On the bright side, we did have fun learning about google hangout!    
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"Seeking to better understand the composition of the lowermost part of Earth’s mantle, located nearly 2,900 kilometers (1,800 miles) below the surface, a team of Arizona State University researchers has developed new simulations that depict the dynamics of deep Earth.

A paper published March 30 in Nature Geoscience reports the team’s findings, which could be used to explain the complex geochemistry of lava from hotspots such as Hawaii."

More here: https://asunews.asu.edu/20140330-dynamic-earth

Nature Geoscience: Chemical complexity of hotspots caused by cycling oceanic crust through mantle reservoirs: http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ngeo2120.html 
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"The disturbance visible at the outer edge of Saturn's A ring in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft could be caused by an object replaying the birth process of icy moons.

The image is adapted from one in a paper in the journal Icarus, reporting the likely presence of an icy body causing gravitational effects on nearby ring particles, producing the bright feature visible at the ring's edge. The object, informally called "Peggy," is estimated to be no more than about half a mile, or one kilometer, in diameter. It may be in the process of migrating out of the ring, a process that one recent theory proposes as a step in the births of Saturn's several icy moons."

Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute 
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+dredre dringo it's Saturn
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When someone is blind from birth, what happens in their brain's visual cortex? Scientists have long thought that this portion of the brain was repurposed, processing the input from a sense other than sight. But technology designed to help blind people "see" using soundscapes tells a different story. Brain scans in blind individuals using this system reveal vision-related brain activity similar to that in sighted people.

RELATED LINKS

Current Biology: Visual Cortex Extrastriate Body-Selective Area Activation in Congenitally Blind People “Seeing” by Using Sounds
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982214001481

Neuroreport: Functional recruitment of visual cortex for sound encoded object identification in the blind.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19104453

EyeMusic
http://www.yissum.co.il/technologies/project/10-2009-2261

Sight Through Sound: The Hebrew University is teaching blind people to see through sound

Seeing with the Ears. Hands and Bionic Eyes: Amir Amedi at TEDxJerusalem

EyeMusic App: Hearing Colored Shapes
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/eyemusic-hearing-colored-shapes/id805461054?mt=8

Seeing with Sound
http://www.seeingwithsound.com/

Artificial Vision
http://www.artificialvision.com/javoice.htm
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Watch how satellites monitor the risks posed to coral reefs by ocean warming, and see where reefs might be more resilient to change in the coming decades.

For additional resources, visit Warm Forecast for Coral Reefs on the Science Bulletins website: http://www.amnh.org/explore/science-bulletins/(watch)/bio/visualizations/warm-forecast-for-coral-reefs

And please join us for a Google Hangout with the scientists behind this visualization, on April 9, 3:30pm EDT:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/100220030981454030845/events/c9c4f010ucindeoig3vdgmnjqvs

Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History. This visualization was supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
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Bobbie Knopick's profile photoLee Lyte's profile phototheprayingmantis.org's profile photoKeith Spell's profile photo
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do we now understand what the chem trails are trying to accomplish  , / slow down the boil over of the earths radiator .../ ease the heat from the sun ?
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Flare and Surging Plasma

Though not a major event, a medium sized (M-class) eruption on the Sun's surface this week certainly delivered an attractive visual display. 

The solar flare burst from an active region near the edge of the Sun (Mar. 31, 2014). It also sent some bright plasma out in a narrow strand, although most of it seemed to fall back into the Sun.

The images were taken in extreme ultraviolet light of ionized helium heated to 60,000 degrees. 

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA.  

More from the Solar Dynamics Observatory at sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/
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Barrios O's profile photoPablo I. Berruecos Vila's profile photoMatt Sanford's profile photoIvana Roksandić-Križan's profile photo
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beautiful wooow
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Graceful Turbulence

Powerful magnetic forces above an active region on the Sun twisted and pulled at a blob of plasma until it lost its connections and blew out into space (Mar. 26, 2014).

The resultant swirling presented its own kind of graceful, almost ballet-like bends and sweeps. To offer some kind of size perspective; that blob, before it broke away, was easily larger than several Earths.

The event was observed in extreme ultraviolet light over about 5.5 hours beginning at 7:00 UT. 

Credit: Solar Dynamics Observatory/NASA.  

More from the Solar Dynamics Observatory at sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/
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Mike Hull's profile photoryon mabey's profile photoGeorge Petersen's profile photoA Zink's profile photo
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+George Petersen What appears to be a hole is a cooler area of Sol. No Fear. See HOW TO WATCH THE SUN 
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Current research about the natural world.
Introduction

Explore the natural world with Science Bulletins; our documentary Feature Stories, Data Visualizations, and News updates focus on recent discoveries and new technologies in astrophysics, Earth science, biodiversity, and human health and evolution.

Astro Bulletin highlights the scientists, observatories, and technologies that advance our knowledge of the cosmos.

Earth Bulletin reports recent events and discoveries related to Earth's land, oceans, and atmosphere.

Bio Bulletin covers the ever-evolving diversity of life on Earth and our human footprint on the biosphere. 

Human Bulletin explores the science of our species, covering fossil and genetic research on human evolution as well as studies on human health and biology.