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Robert Dwayne
Outdoor Tips and Gear Reviews
Outdoor Tips and Gear Reviews
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Survival Kit- The Essentials
Survival Kit- The Essentials
rangermade-usa.blogspot.be
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Deer Hunting on a Rainy Day
Deer Hunting on a Rainy Day
rangermade-usa.blogspot.be
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3 Feeding Tips when Surviving
3 Feeding Tips when Surviving
rangermade-usa.blogspot.be
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10 Things to Do for Surviving in the Outdoors

When you’re in the middle of nowhere, in the darkest night, even the simplest thing like a candle or a sip of water can make the difference. Even though we barely see it when we’re at home or in town, there are only some simple things that can get you out of trouble when out in the wild.

1. Stay positive
No matter how scared or alone you may feel, try to get it out of your head and be positive, think “happy thoughts”. We always here how it’s all in our mind and surviving is also about that.

2. Check up your gear
It’s essential to take a look at your gear and to think of a plan with the things you got for finding a solution. Even a small thing, like a shoe lace, can mean the salvation in your case- but you need to stay focused and positive!

3. Tell someone
No matter how short you think your hike is going to be, always let your friends and family know about where you’re going. They may be able to go on your track later on and save you.

4. The rule of “3”
You can survive 3 hours on a bad weather, 3 days without water and 3 weeks without food. With this in mind, pack your bags accordingly and always be prepared for the bad weather!

5. Always build a shelter
This is something you should practice every time you have the chance. With so many tutorials out there, it’s hard not to get familiar with building a shelter from scratch. You only need to take a look around and see what you may use for it.

6. Make a fire
Not only a fire is going to keep you warm but it also may let your rescuers tell them where you are or were at some point. A light is also going to keep the predators at distance.

7. The survival tool
This one you should have on you no matter what. It’s a multi-tool that helps you cut, protect or prepare your food. It’s a knife that can do so many other things and you should invest wisely.

8. The compass
Whether it’s a small one or it’s built-in your watch, the compass is great as it tells you where you are. If you know about stars, it’s even better: surviving is just one step away.

9. The big letters
When we see it in the movies, we do find it amusing, but writing “SOS” or “Help” in big letters may save you, indeed.

10. Keep your mind busy and your belly full
You can’t think on an empty stomach and once your food and snacks are gone, you should embrace anything and everything, from leaves to bugs and eggs. Protein gives you strength and you need it for surviving.
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5 Reasons to Go in the Outdoors

Take a look outside your window and stop wondering if you should go out or not. If you’re sitting on a fence and don’t know whether to start hiking or simply spend more time in the outdoors, get down already and pack your bags!
There are plenty of reasons for which the outdoors is great for you so, in case you need a bit more than that to be convinced, here’s a short list for you.

1. Restoring your mental energy
Did you ever feel like your brain couldn’t concentrate anymore and needed a break? You can get rid of “mental fatigue” by spending some time in restorative environments, which is the great outdoors.
Studies show us that our mental energy bounces back even when looking at pictures of nature. Don’t think that pictures of cities have the same effect, though.
As a matter of fact, there are plenty of researches out there that show us how great the outdoors is for our mental energy. It seems that natural beauty can give us feelings of awe, very well known for its ability to boost our mental energy.

2. Relieving stress
Whenever you’re feeling stressed and tensed, put on your boots and go outside. There are plenty of researches on that also, one of them showing us that students spending two nights in the forest showed lower level of cortisol. This hormone is a marker for stress and the study was pretty clear on that.
Subjects spending time in the forest have also shown a decrease of heart rate and levels of cortisol, when compared to the ones left in the city.
So, if you’re feeling all stresses out, trying some forest therapy is the way to go. Nature is that powerful that even if you’re sitting in your office, but have a nature view over your window, your stress level may be lower and your job satisfaction higher.

3. Your short-memory gets better
Here’s a study for you: one group of participants walked down a city street and the other group spent some time around an arboretum. When they got back, the group spending time around trees performed 20% better than the first time. As for the group walking down the city streets, they didn’t improve much their results.
Another study shows us that depressed subjects walking in nature improved their working memory a lot more than the ones simply walking in urban environments.

4. Your vision improves
Many researches showed us that children spending time in the outdoors present a lower risk for developing nearsightedness (myopia). The conclusion is the more time your kid spends in the outdoors, the lower is the risk for him to develop myopia.
A study on 2,000 school children in Australia also shows that a longer time in the outdoors minimizes the prevalence of myopia among 12-year-olds.
the conclusion is quite simple: spending time in the outdoors does minimize the risk for myopia and improves your vision.

5. Inflammation is reduced
Inflammation is your body’s natural reaction to threats like damage (injuring a finger) or pathogens (exposing to the flu). Spending time in the outdoors may help you get a better immune system.
For instance, one study shows that students spending time in the forest presented lower levels of inflammation than the students who only spent time in the city.
The same reaction happens to elderly patients that presented a lower sign of inflammation. Additionally, their hypertension improved after a long walk in the forest.
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3 Tips when Hunting Locked-Down Bucks


As November comes, we see bucks all over the place and it’s only a matter of time until you get to kill one. Once breeding is peeking, the hunting pressure is getting higher and the bucks get so difficult to find.
If you’re wise enough, you’re going to stop tracking the empty trails from a week ago and go ahead with trying some new methods instead. After all, you do want to be able to shoot something.

1. Bring a friend
This is a great method to try when hunting in some public big woods. You may sneak into a swamp, as it’s a great cover for bucks as they’re tempting to escape. Get a hunting mate with you. One of you may go off 50 to 60 yards and make a slow circle around the buck. You continue doing it, widening the next loop with the same distance. Most bucks are going to run some short ways, especially when bedded with a doe, circling back all over again. So it’s only a matter of time until your hunting mate is going to get the shot.

2. Prepare the bedding area when still-hunt
Hunting isn’t mend to be easy so you shouldn’t lose your patience while waiting for your buck along some feeding areas, terrain funnels or scrape lines. You may even decide to go looking for your lockdown on a cedar ridge, as you simply know it’s its favorite spot. Wind in your face, while still-hunting to the ridge end, you’re dropping to one knee every three steps so that you increase your chances. You always need to be prepared and ready as it may surprise you and you may not have time to thread a shot into the shoulder of the buck.

3. Stalking and the open-country spot
Some whitetails experts use the open terrain for their advantage as they set a high point, overlooking the creek drainages. If you’re lucky enough, you should be able to spot a buck on the move. You may use your binocular though to pick apart cover, glassing for something small, as even a small twitching ear or a tine are easy to spot if you pay attention.
You may spot a breeding pair, in which case you should mark the location and plan a stalk. As you get into range, you may prop your rifle on a shooting stick, whistling to get the buck to stand up.
Keep in mind that it’s fundamental that you have your rifle shouldered. Once a buck is standing, you only have few seconds to shoot.
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