Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Melanie Benton
271 followers
271 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Author’s Note

From "The Coin," Coming Soon!

This is a rather unique tale of a coin. Yes, that's correct, a silver dollar coin, minted in 1803, or was it? The front says 1804, but isn't that the date it was minted? No, it isn't the minted date. “The 1804 silver dollar was actually produced in 1834, when the U.S. Department of State decided to produce a set of U.S. coins to be used as gifts to rulers in Asia in exchange for trade advantages. Since 1804 was the last recorded year of mintage for both the dollar and $10 Eagle, it was decided that the set would contain examples of those coins dated 1804, as well as the other denominations currently being produced. Mint officials, not realizing that the 19,000+ dollars recorded as being produced in 1804 were all dated 1803, proceeded to make new dies dated 1804.” The dies were very expensive, and the government didn't have the funds at the time to change dies each year.

Nonetheless, this is the exciting story of a coin that is interwoven with the lives of those who carry and spend it. Some will have the piece of silver for a short time, while others will have it for years. It will witness murders, robberies, Indian massacres, greed, join other coins in a burlap bag in a western bank, be buried in the backyard of a house down South with the coming of the Civil War, hunt buffalo with the hide hunters and help build a transcontinental railroad as well. Its owners will vary, just as a real coin would. I picked the 1804 silver dollar because it gives me the longest period to write about and not worry about coin collectors. Most Americans in the 1800's earned less than a dollar a day, so a dollar coin was worth too much to keep in a collection. Many men earned $15 a month, with found. Found means a roof over their head and three meals or less a day. Many cowboys earned just that, $15 a month and found. The number of meals depended on the boss and the deals that could be worked out between the two of you. Usually at least two meals were given per day. With meals being free, or part of a man's wages, they were Spartan at best with most being beans, bacon, fried taters, and cornbread. It quickly became the national meal of a growing nation.

Many people will own this coin and some longer than others, but each person has a story to tell and this coin is the only common bond in all these stories. Each person’s story will be told as they carry this coin. First, there is the curse, where a New Orleans Hoo-doo witch doctor curses the coin as being evil and prepares it for the journey into the world. Once free flowing and in the hands of others, the coin will belong to a number of different people and this is their tale. There will be the mountain man, the Indian, the trader, the settler, the soiled dove, the preacher, the drunk, the rich man, the teacher, the Union soldier, the buffalo hide skinner, the gambler, the soldier with Custer, the homesteader and the collector. I hope in each case to develop a book on each of the above characters. Some of these people will be good and some evil.

My manuscript idea came from an old 1883 Morgan silver dollar I have had since a child, given to me by my grandfather, who was born around 1880. I realized, fifty years after getting it, the stories it could tell if it could only talk. My coin has over 184 years of history it could share with me. I have only been caretaker of my coin for a small time. In this work, I have taken the liberty of giving my coin a literary voice and making it a teller of tall tales. I look forward to the series and think it will be great fun to write and to read.

I can imagine the coin as a mature soiled dove takes it as payment for services rendered, and it slides down her breast to join the other coins, or the Sioux Indian that takes it, along with his scalp, from the mountain man he has killed deep in Blackfoot country, or the army scout that kills the Indian and removes the coin from his ear, the travelling preacher who gives it to a grieving widow who has just lost her husband to cancer and is left with nothing. Each will be a story with a smooth transition to the next owner. I may make this one book, a sort of collection of short stories, or perhaps a number of books. I see great potential here for some excellent reading. I will speak to my publisher at Loose Cannon Enterprises and let you know what is suggested and our decision.

In the meantime, the first few owners will be introduced and the coin will be out in circulation, then other stories will be told at later dates. The other coin shown in the book is mine as well, and it is an 1851 united states token dollar, worth very little because they were never minted by the United States. Most are copies of old coins used back in the day by con artists to sucker those unaware. Mine is probably a copy from some third world nation, and recent from the condition of the coin, but by golly, I like the looks of it. I paid $2 for it and it's a good historical piece to have in my very small selection of coins. My whole collection is tiny and maybe, if sold for the silver content alone, it's only real value, worth much less than a $100 total. I tend to keep what I like and what has emotional value for me. I'm not in coin collecting to make money.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Coming this spring. Can 3 young men survive the fall of America? Children's book.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Coming soon, "The Coin," by WR Benton.

This is a rather unique tale of a coin. Yes, that's correct, a silver dollar coin, minted in 1803, or was it? The front says 1804, but isn't that the date it was minted? No, it isn't the minted date. “The 1804 silver dollar was actually produced in 1834, when the U.S. Department of State decided to produce a set of U.S. coins to be used as gifts to rulers in Asia in exchange for trade advantages. Since 1804 was the last recorded year of mintage for both the dollar and $10 Eagle, it was decided that the set would contain examples of those coins dated 1804, as well as the other denominations currently being produced. Mint officials, not realizing that the 19,000+ dollars recorded as being produced in 1804 were all dated 1803, proceeded to make new dies dated 1804.1” The dies were very expensive, and the government didn't have the funds at the time to change dies each year.

Nonetheless, this is the exciting story of a coin that is interwoven with the lives of those who carry and spend it. Some will have the piece of silver for a short time, while others will have it for years. It will witness murders, robberies, Indian massacres, greed, join other coins in a burlap bag in a western bank, be buried in the backyard of a house down South with the coming of the Civil War, hunt buffalo with the hide hunters and help build a transcontinental railroad as well. Its owners will vary, just as a real coin would. I picked the 1804 silver dollar because it gives me the longest period to write about and not worry about coin collectors.

Most Americans in the 1800's earned less than a dollar a day, so a dollar coin was worth too much to keep in a collection. Many men earned $15 a month, with found. Found means a roof over their head and three meals or less a day. Many cowboys earned just that, $15 a month and found. The number of meals depended on the boss and the deals that could be worked out between the two of you. Usually at least two meals were given per day. With meals being free, or part of a man's wages, they were Spartan at best with most being beans, bacon, fried taters, and cornbread. It quickly became the national meal of a growing nation.

Many people will own this coin and some longer than others, but each person has a story to tell and this coin is the only common bond in all these stories. Each person’s story will be told as they carry this coin. First, there is the curse, where a New Orleans Hoo-doo witch doctor curses the coin as being evil and prepares it for the journey into the world. Once free flowing and in the hands of others, the coin will belong to a number of different people and this is their tale. There will be the mountain man, the Indian, the trader, the settler, the soiled dove, the preacher, the drunk, the rich man, the teacher, the Union soldier, the buffalo hide skinner, the gambler, the soldier with Custer, the homesteader and the collector. I hope in each case to develop a book on each of the above characters. Some of these people will be good and some evil.

My manuscript idea came from an old 1883 Morgan silver dollar I have had since a child, given to me by my grandfather, who was born around 1880. I realized, fifty years after getting it, the stories it could tell if it could only talk. My coin has over 184 years of history it could share with me. I have only been caretaker of my coin for a small time. In this work, I have taken the liberty of giving my coin a literary voice and making it a teller of tall tales. I look forward to the series and think it will be great fun to write and to read.

I can imagine the coin as a mature soiled dove takes it as payment for services rendered, and it slides down her breast to join the other coins, or the Sioux Indian that takes it, along with his scalp, from the mountain man he has killed deep in Blackfoot country, or the army scout that kills the Indian and removes the coin from his ear, the travelling preacher who gives it to a grieving widow who has just lost her husband to cancer and is left with nothing. Each will be a story with a smooth transition to the next owner. I may make this one book, a sort of collection of short stories, or perhaps a number of books. I see great potential here for some excellent reading. I will speak to my publisher at Loose Cannon Enterprises and let you know what is suggested and our decision.

In the meantime, the first few owners will be introduced and the coin will be out in circulation, then other stories will be told at later dates. The other coin that is shown (the image on the right on this page) in the book is mine as well, and it is an 1851 united states token dollar, worth very little because they were never minted by the United States. Most are copies of old coins used back in the day by con artists to sucker those unaware. Mine is probably a copy from some third world nation, and recent from the condition of the coin, but by golly, I like the looks of it. I paid $2 for it and it's a good historical piece to have in my very small selection of coins. My whole collection is tiny and maybe, if sold for the silver content alone, it's only real value, worth much less than a $100 total. I tend to keep what I like and what has emotional value for me. I'm not in coin collecting to make money.
Photo
Add a comment...

Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A new series coming from the desk of author W. R. Benton.

If you loved the Nate Grisham series or Fall Of America.

You haven't seen anything yet.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
You got to love book endorsements from fans of W. R. Benton. This from the Nate Grisham book series.
Photo
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Visit Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Youngest-Mountain-Man-Book/dp/B06XDPFPDY/ and read how a young white child is raised as a mountain man and befriends a Sioux his own age. Together they take on the world.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded