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Jerry Caudle
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Best Gift Shop, Old Time Candy Store and all around general store in downtown, Mayberry.
Best Gift Shop, Old Time Candy Store and all around general store in downtown, Mayberry.

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LUMINARA CANDLES...THE PERFECT GIFT!
LUMINARA CANDLES....THEY ARE JUST BEAUTIFUL...ADD THIS STUNNING CANDLE WITH ANY OF OUR LANTERNS....TO YOUR HOME TODAY....OR GIVE IT TO THAT SOMEONE SPECIAL FOR CHRISTMAS....SEE YOU SOON, DOWNTOWN, MUCH MORE THAN JUST MAYBERRY!
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AMAZING GRACE....HOW SWEET THE SOUND....ADD THIS BEAUTIFUL LIGHTED CANVAS TO YOUR HOME OR GIVE AS A AWESOME GIFT TO ANYONE....SEE YOU SOON, DOWNTOWN....MUCH MORE THAN JUST MAYBERRY
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Andy Griffith was born 89 years ago today
from +Frank Beacham 

Griffith was an actor, television producer, Southern-gospel singer and writer. He gained prominence in the starring role in director Elia Kazan's film A Face in the Crowd (1957) before he became better known for his television roles, playing the lead character in the 1960–1968 situation comedy The Andy Griffith Show and in the 1986–1995 legal drama, Matlock.

Griffith was born in Mount Airy, North Carolina. As a baby, Griffith lived with relatives until his parents could afford to buy a home.
With neither a crib nor a bed, he slept in dresser drawers for several months. In 1929, when Griffith was three, his father began working as a carpenter and purchased a home in Mount Airy's "blue-collar" south side.

Griffith grew up listening to music. By the time he entered school, he was well aware that he was from what many considered the "wrong side of the tracks." He was a shy student, but once he found a way to make his peers laugh, he began to come out of his shell and into his own.

As a student at Mount Airy High School, Griffith cultivated an interest in the arts, and he participated in the school's drama program. A growing love of music — particularly swing — would change his life.

He attended the University of North Carolina (UNC) in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and graduated with a bachelor of music degree in 1949. He began college studying to be a Moravian preacher, but he changed his major to music and became a part of the school's Carolina Playmakers.

He also played roles in several student operettas, including The Chimes of Normandy (1946), Gilbert and Sullivan's The Gondoliers (1945), The Mikado (1948) and H.M.S. Pinafore (1949).

After graduation, he taught music and drama for a few years at Goldsboro High School in Goldsboro, North Carolina, where he taught, among others, Carl Kasell. He also began to write.

Griffith's early career was as a monologist, delivering long stories such as What it Was, Was Football, which is told from the point of view of a rural backwoodsman trying to figure out what was going on in a football game.

The monologue was released as a single in 1953 on the Colonial Records label and was a hit for Griffith, reaching #9 on the charts in 1954.

Griffith starred in Ira Levin's one-hour teleplay version of No Time for Sergeants (March 1955) — a story about a country boy in the United States Air Force — on The United States Steel Hour, a television anthology series.

He expanded that role in Ira Levin's full-length theatrical version of the same name (October 1955) on Broadway in New York City.

Griffith later reprised his role for the film version (1958) of No Time for Sergeants; the film also featured Don Knotts, as a corporal in charge of manual-dexterity tests, marking the beginning of a lifelong association between Griffith and Knotts.
No Time for Sergeants is considered the direct inspiration for the later television situation comedy Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

In 1957, Griffith made his film début, starring in the film A Face in the Crowd. Although he plays a "country boy," this country boy is manipulative and power-hungry, a drifter who becomes a television host and uses his show as a gateway to political power.

Co-starring Patricia Neal, Walter Matthau, Tony Franciosa and Lee Remick (in her film début as well), the film was directed by Elia Kazan and written by Budd Schulberg.

In 1960, Griffith appeared as a county sheriff (who was also a justice of the peace and the editor of the local newspaper) in an episode of Make Room for Daddy, starring Danny Thomas.

This episode, in which Thomas' character is stopped for speeding in a little town, served as a backdoor pilot for The Andy Griffith Show. Both shows were produced by Sheldon Leonard.

Beginning that same year, Griffith starred as Sheriff Andy Taylor in The Andy Griffith Show for the CBS television network. The show took place in the fictional town of Mayberry, North Carolina, where Taylor, a widower, was the sheriff and town sage. The show was filmed at Desilu Studios, with exteriors filmed at Forty Acres in Culver City, California.

From 1960 to 1965, the show co-starred character actor and comedian — and Griffith's longtime friend — Don Knotts in the role of Deputy Barney Fife, Taylor's best friend and partner. He was also Taylor's cousin in the show.
It was an immediate hit. Griffith never received a writing credit for the show, but he worked on the development of every script.

Knotts was frequently lauded and won multiple Emmy Awards for his comedic performances (as did Frances Bavier in 1967), while Griffith was never nominated for an Emmy Award during the show's run.

In 1967, Griffith was under contract with CBS to do one more season of the show. However, he decided to quit the show to pursue a movie career and other projects.

The series continued as Mayberry R.F.D., with Ken Berry starring as a widower farmer and many of the regular characters recurring, some regularly and some as guest appearances.

After spending time in rehabilitation for leg paralysis from Guillain–Barré syndrome in 1986, Griffith returned to television as the title character, Ben Matlock, in the legal drama Matlock (1986–1995) on NBC and ABC.

Matlock was a country lawyer in Atlanta, Georgia, who was known for his Southern drawl and for always winning his cases.

Matlock also starred unfamiliar actors (both of whom were childhood fans of Andy Griffith) Nancy Stafford as Michelle Thomas (1987–1992) and Clarence Gilyard, Jr. as Conrad McMasters (1989–1993). By the end of its first season, it was a ratings powerhouse on Tuesday nights.

Griffith sang as part of some of his acting roles, most notably in A Face In The Crowd and in many episodes of both The Andy Griffith Show and Matlock.
In addition to his recordings of comic monologues in the 1950s, he made an album of upbeat country and gospel tunes during the run of The Andy Griffith Show, which included a version of the show's theme sung by Griffith under the title "The Fishin' Hole."

On July 3, 2012, Andy Griffith died from a heart attack at age 86 at his coastal home in Manteo, Roanoke Island in Dare County, North Carolina.
Here, Griffith does “the dark night of the soul” scene in A Face in the Crowd in 1957
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