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GUI for Hyper-V vtUtilities management tool
GUI for Hyper-V vtUtilities management tool

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Everything is going to big datacenters "in the cloud". From my understanding, a majority of these datacenters are run by Linux.
So in a few years, will Windows no longer be as valuable? Sure, Windows will still be used for desktop/workstations for schools and governments but enterprise level stuff will all be Linux, right?
So is it even worth trying to go down the MCSA Microsoft Server path? Should I focus on the Azure on Linux MCSA instead? Or just stick to getting an MCSA in Windows 10? Or is an MCSA not going to hold any value in 5 years time?
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Over the past few years, the virtualization market has become saturated. There aren't any major new players on the scene and most data centers have already been virtualized, leading to revenue stagnation. Last year, Gartner reported a decline in new software licenses for the first time since virtualization became mainstream over a decade ago. In fact, the bulk of x86 server virtualization revenue now comes from maintenance rather than new licenses.

When this kind of market saturation occurs, it's often the company on top that's hit the hardest. In this case, that's VMware. Without any net-new virtualization opportunities, vendors have started cannibalizing their competitors' customers. Since VMware has the biggest market share in the industry, it only makes sense that it has the largest target on its back with Microsoft and open source competitors vying for its customer base.

It's worth noting that since Microsoft offers Hyper-V for free in its Windows Server operating system, it's hard to ascertain how much revenue the hypervisor itself generates, and whether this market saturation will have as great an effect on Microsoft as it does VMware.

Not only has VMware experienced a decrease in vSphere revenue, but it's also feeling the fallout from the rapid adoption of cloud computing. The infrastructure-as-a-service cloud market has been growing steadily at a rate of 40% in revenue per year since 2011, and Gartner predicts that by 2019, the majority of new VMs will be deployed by cloud providers. Customers are now looking to Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform for net-new workloads.

VMware hasn't taken the news lying down. The company has broadened its portfolio in anticipation of this market saturation and now encompasses the software-defined data center with vSAN and NSX.
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