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Nils Rehmann
Works at NiRem Consulting
Attended University College Dublin - National University of Ireland, Dublin
Lives in Keswick Ridge, NB, Canada
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Nils Rehmann

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I agree to some extent. The population size of this wonderful province does limit the extend of goverment and number of goverment structures. However, starting to cut down essential services such as health, education and/or infrastructure are the steps often taken by our leaders. All the while neglecting gross overspending in other areas. Better ways to control the spending and therefore keep some of the essential services are relatively obvious to many people. It is this discord that creates the mistrust and disconnect to our politicians in the people. While the public might have many credible ideas as to how NB could start turning the tide and get on a better way into the future, politicians seem to be deaf and idealess at the same time. A dangerous combination.
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Nils Rehmann

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Thursday,March 13,2014

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Wildlife ecologist Graham Forbes says the new Crown forest policy is an "abject fail." (CBC)

(Department of Natural Resources)

New Crown forestry plan greeted with shock, dismay

Line in the sand to protect wildlife, nature has been crossed, says forestry professor Graham Forbes

CBC News

Posted:Mar 13, 2014 9:57 AM AT Last Updated:Mar 13, 2014 12:41 PM AT

The Alward government's decision to increase the amount of softwood that industrial forest operations will be allowed to cut on Crown land is being greeted with shock and dismay in some corners.

The new forest policy was announced Wednesday. It boosts the amount of softwood that can be cut on Crown land annually by 20 per cent, or 660,000 cubic meters.

To help achieve that, the amount of Crown land that is off-limits to the forest industry — such as old growth forest and deer wintering habitat — has been reduced to 23 per cent, from the traditional level of 30 per cent.

"I'm shocked," said Graham Forbes, a forestry professor at the University of New Brunswick. "The reduction of the amount of protected land to 23 per cent is not what we could call sustainable forest management."

"It's an abject fail. It's not sustainable. It's a joke."

That 23 per cent consists of the 7 per cent of Crown land that is old growth forest, 8 per cent designated as protected natural areas, and 8 per cent that is in buffer zones around watercourses and wetlands.

The new policy states the strategy is "balanced" and respects the principles of conservation and biodiversity.

Forbes doesn't accept that.

"The minister loves talking about balance and I'm getting very tired of hearing the word balance," he said.

"It's often put out there as an idea of fairness and 50-50, but it was never 50-50.

"It was usually about 70 per cent of the pie toward timber and jobs, the economic aspect. Thirty per cent is the minimum required to protect these other values," said Forbes.

'We've set this as a line in the sand and we've gone below it.'- Graham Forbes, UNB forestry professor

"We've set this as a line in the sand and we've gone below it."

Roberta Clowater, the executive director of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society in New Brunswick, called the new policy "regressive."

"It's really important that the people of New Brunswick understand that the government is taking away more than a quarter of the amount of our public land that used to be specially managed to conserve wildlife and rivers and fish," said Clowater. "And they're basically giving it over to increased logging and much more clear-cutting."

Government maintains the increased wood volume can be achieved without increasing the proportion of clear cutting taking place. Over the next 10 years, the government says the reliance on clear cutting will be reduced with more wood being harvested through commercial thinning.

"This is a really regressive plan," said Clowater. "It's taking away basically the advancements that we've made in forest management planning over the last 30 years and it's leaving us behind every other province in Canada.

"New Brunswickers need to understand this is really serious change," said Clowater. " I …don't believe the forest eco-system is going to be able to sustain this amount of pressure on public land."

'"New Brunswickers need to understand this is really serious change.'- Roberta Clowater, N.B. executive director Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

The new forest policy document shows that under the new strategy, 26 per cent of the annual cut will come from mature stands initially and 12 per cent from silviculture plantations. The policy projects that in 50 years, 10 per cent of the annual softwood volume will come from mature stands and 21 per cent will be from tree plantations.

"It's Jaakko Pöyry delayed," said Forbes, referring to a 2001 report commissioned by the provincial government that recommended ways to double the annual allowable cut within 60 years.

A government committee studied the report and held public hearings before rejecting the report's recommendations.

"Essentially it was rejected as not being what people wanted," said Forbes. "They did not want that much industrial forest. They wanted other values represented and they didn't support the guaranteed wood supply."

Clowater also noted the increase in the harvest from tree plantations that is projected over time.

"Certainly, that increase is coming at a cost of less area that is going to be specially managed to conserve wildlife habitat for species that don't do well in plantations, which are many," she said.

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Nils Rehmann's profile photoPaul Rocks's profile photo
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+Paul Rocks sadly to true...haha. But first we have to get all the oil and gas out of the melted permafrost. Otherwise it would it a waste of good resources...
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Love this.....England!
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A shout out to the RNLI crew from Clifden for their professional help to stranded fish farmers today. Well done lads.
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Wow, well done lads!
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Nils Rehmann

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My answer to No. 1 is always: I used to be a catholic...but I am feeling much better now.
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True true.... 
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Nils Rehmann

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I would love to watch this, but what is with those stupid messaging in the bottom.....ruins it.
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Nils Rehmann

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How often have I felt like this.....

I can do absolutely anything...I am an EXPERT!!!
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In my opinion this is Dark Modulators best mix. In fact one of the best mixes on the web indeed.
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No sweat. Great song. I listened to this mix I think 100 times now? so I figured it was around there
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I wanted to share this with you all. Here is a wiki article about Ma'at an egyptian goddess. Her laws are the 10 commandments...sorry the 42 commandments. But since Moses grew up in Egypt I believe he would have heard those before he had grown up. I find it fascinating how close Ma'at got to the Christian commandments.
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+Nils Rehmann 
Okay, I only have limited time now, but I'll try to share a few thoughts on the "42 negative confessions" as they are commonly known. 

First, they don't seem to be a very strong historical analog to the 10 commandments given at Mt. Sinai as they are not a "codified ethic" or written law.  Instead, they seem to be a commonly used eulogy that declare how the individual tried to please Maat.  (They also seem to be a bit less than honest, at that...  "I have not committed sin.")

Another interesting thing I noticed is the directedness of the statements compared to those of the ten commandments. 

The ten commandments are typically understood to have the first 4 commands relating to one's relationship with God and the final 6 relating to one's relationship with other people.  I might make some argument that that the 4th (regarding the Sabath) could actually be a personal command for one's self based on Jesus' statements about the Sabath, but that's a longer discussion.

In contrast, the 42 confessions seem to have about 8 statements directed toward the gods, 21 statements regarding other people, and about 13 that seem to be regarding the individual whose eulogy it was.

The obvious thing someone might point out is that these people clearly had some idea of the general expectation for moral behavior (whether they actually followed them might be another issue).  So, the 10 commandments aren't necessarily an entirely new concept.  I would be inclined to agree, and the Bible itself also indicates that mankind knows the basic principles of morality without requiring any specific written law.  In fact, this built-in conscience or sense of morality is one way that people can know there is a God.  (Romans 2:12-16)

+Keith Elias
I'm no Egyptology expert, but I know that there is some amount of flux regarding the commonly accepted timelines due to better understanding of overlapping reigns, how they recorded history, etc.  So, I'm not sure whether that date is correct or not, but assuming that time span (200 years) is correct, I don't find it very surprising according to biblical history.  Within only around 100 years after the flood, God had to judge mankind again at Babel because of direct disobedience, and many scholars believe idol worship was already established at that time.  Certainly, archaeology has confirmed that as society spread from that area, towers and polytheistic idol worship spread accordingly.  Later in Israelite history, we see these seemingly schizophrenic rapid swings often.  It seems Jeremiah was quite right when he wrote, "The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?" (Jeremiah 17:9 [KJV])
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+Nils Rehmann Can there also be built-in evolutionary reasons to make us desire control over our environment as some type of ancient survival mechanism?
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Have him in circles
192 people
John Davies's profile photo
Andrej Drapal's profile photo
Natali Sokolova's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Consultant
Skills
Analytical Chemistry, Natural Product Chemistry, Pharmacy, Toxicology, Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry, Lab optimisation, Lab Management, Permaculture, Green consulting
Employment
  • NiRem Consulting
    present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Keswick Ridge, NB, Canada
Previously
Mettmann, NRW, Germany - Galway, Ireland - Christchurch, New Zealand - Oslo, Norway - Idstein, Hessen, Germany
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Story
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Consultant in search for a perfect world
Introduction
After studying chemical engineering and topping it up with a Ph.D. in Toxicology and Pharmacology with an emphasis on Natural Products I ventured into the Analytical Chemistry world. There I was faced with what many people know but ignore on a daily basis. How messed up is our world and environment? It is unfathomable. Therefore I decided to change directions and apply my skills and enthusiasm for the betterment of the environment and our local communities.  

As an Analytical Chemist that worked a lot in the field of regulatory compliance and as an advocate of Marihuana for Medical Purposes I recently founded NiRem Consulting. NiRem's mission is to help individuals and companies to achieve licensing under the new Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulation (MMPR).
Please check www.Nirem.ca for further details and ways to contact.
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Education
  • University College Dublin - National University of Ireland, Dublin
    Toxicology and Pharmacology, 2003 - 2008
  • University of Applied Science Fresesnius
    Chemical Engineering, 1999 - 2003
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