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Sevenoaks Plans Ltd
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Dont Move Improve!!!
Dont Move Improve!!!

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Start of June and two planning applications granted. Very exciting start of the summer
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Do I need planning permission?

Although it might seem like an unnecessary inconvenience, it’s vital that you take the time to establish if you need planning permission. Here's out guide to arm you with all the info you need.

Obtaining planning permission for your dream home improvement project, can often seem like something of a nightmare – with complex regulations and legislations often making it difficult to establish if you need planning permission in the first place and, if you do, how to obtain it.

Of course, whether you will need planning permission or not depends upon a whole range of factors including the type and age of your property, the nature of the work you are planning, and the impact it will have on both the interior and the exterior of your home.

Although it might seem like an unnecessary inconvenience, it’s vital that you take the time to establish if you need planning permission. After all, if you need it but complete the work without it, you might find yourself served with an enforcement notice ordering you to undo all the hard work you’ve done.

As a general rule, you’ll typically need planning permission if you want to:

- Build something new

- Make a substantial change to your building (such as an extension)

- Change the use of your building

Here’s a more detailed breakdown of when you do and do not need planning permission – of course, there are always exceptions, so make sure you contact your Local Planning Authority or visit the Planning Portal for further details.

Extensions

An extension to your home is typically considered to be a permitted development, meaning you won’t need to seek planning permission, providing:

- The extension is no more than half of the area of the land around the original house (as it was in 1948 or, if it was built after this date, when it was newly built)

- It is not in front of the principal elevation or side elevation onto a highway

- It is not higher than the highest part of the roof

- If it is a single storey extension, it must not extend past the rear wall of the original house by more than three meters (or four metres in the case of a detached house)

- If it is a single storey extension, it is not higher than four metres

- If it is more than one storey, it does not extend beyond the wall of the original house by more than three metres

- If it is a side extension, it must be single storey with a maximum height of four meters and a maximum width of no more than half of the original house

- Two storey extensions must be no less than seven metres to the rear boundary

- The materials are similar in appearance to the existing house

- It does not include verandas, balconies, or raised platforms

- Any upper-floor, side-facing windows are obscure-glazed

Conservatories

The same rules apply as extensions.

Garages, sheds, and other outbuildings

Garages, sheds, greenhouses, and other outbuildings are also considered to be permitted to developments and you are free to build them without planning permission as long as they are no higher than four metres.

They must not, however, take up more than half of the land around the original property.

Paving over the front garden

If you are paving over the front garden with a porous material, you do not need planning permission, regardless of the size of the project.

If you are using impermeable material, however, you will need to apply for permission for anything over 5 square metres.

Windows and doors

Typically, you do not require planning permission to repair or replace windows or doors, unless the property is listed, however, in which case you will need listed building consent.

External walls and roof

You do not require planning permission for maintenance works or improvements, such as painting your house or adding a skylight. If you live in a conservation area or an area of outstanding natural beauty, you will need to obtain planning permission if you want to change the appearance of your home.

Wind turbines and solar panels

Although temporary wind turbines do not usually require planning permission, permanent ones usually do. Unless you live in a listed building, you will not typically need planning permission for solar panels.

Fences, gates, and walls

You will need to obtain planning permission for any gate, fence, or wall, if it:

- Is located next to a road and is over 1 metre high

- Isn’t next to a road but is over 2 metres high

- Is a listed building

- Forms a boundary with a listed building

Indoors

The majority of internal works, such as loft conversions, garage conversions, new staircases, bathrooms, kitchens, and rewiring do not require planning permission, unless of course the property is listed.
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One of the questions we are asked a great deal is about our process from survey to a contractor. We just wanted to clarify the steps for the planning application

1. Planning application made to the local council - This will take a minimum of 8 weeks from when the application is made. From payment to ourselves and to the local council.
2. Once planning permission is granted we will inform you then we will proceed with building control.
3. We will send you a schedule of works template so you can start making decisions on the fixtures and fittings you will require and this will help you gain quotations from builders.
4. A structural engineer will need to be instructed and I have gained a quotation for this already. The structural engineer will design the beams required and also the foundations for the extension and the workshop. The structural engineer will then draw up a structural calculations pack which will be used for building control.
5. The building control drawings will then be sent to The local council who will be in contact with you for payment.
6. Once we have completed the building control drawings we will help you gain quotations - should you wish us to help - from recommended builders who we advise you meet prior to all this so you can get a feeling for them and also your house which they will be working on for you. This is where the schedule of works will be very useful so that they will know what they are quoting for and cannot give you any nasty shocks through the building process and ask for extra money. We also advise you use kitchen fitters and designers who are recommended by the builders as they will get you a discount on fittings etc.
7. Project fees and start times.


Once payment is made the planning process can begin on this exciting stage.
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A site in Riverhead Sevenoaks Plans are working on with a local Builder
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A two storey extension we have designed and which we are working closely with a local "Which Trusted trader" in Tunbridge
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1 of 5 sites which sevenoaks Plans have designed and are having built at the moment in the area
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Seven Questions with Sevenoaks Chamber of Commerce
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So four planning applications through this month so far. Going very well so far. New sign put up at Sevenoaks primary school who we are sponsoring.
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We are very excited to be sponsoring Sevenoaks Primary School. 5% of any fees from Parents or siblings at Sevenoaks Primary School goes back to the school for Fundraising
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