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Dave Holladay
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
NB Stats 20 used to be clear about single vehicle crashes, and even gave as an example a cycle crash involving no other vehicle. (so for driver read rider also) - sadly I'm pretty sure one of my big crashes has never been recorded

This detail is recorded by hand and for London this goes in a little yellow crash recording book that gets POSTED to a (manual) data input centre in S London. With all the inherent 'holes' to lose/corrupt detail. For speed  of recording I'm also hearing that many just tick 'failed to look' when it is difficult to clearly establish otherwise.

Only for a really serious shout does a the detail get the finer scrutiny of the crash investigators, before valuable transient detail is lost
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
Please add - effective and objective investigation of all crashes, with those reports published (on-line) for all to learn from.

Worth noting that 80+% of urban HGV-Cycle fatal crashes fit the SAME pattern, and the front n/s corner of the truck huts the rear o/s corner of the bike.  There are alarmingly similar repeat 'performances'  2 identical fatal crashes at same location 5 years apart, 3 fatal crashes at Bow, all through same left turning move, a detail which remains as a hazard and relies with supreme naievete on all road users fully complying with traffic signals (circulating drivers run through red lights up to 10 seconds AFTER these have turned red).

Key to this is management & monitoring. In London some 60+ separate contracts for refuse collection have been consolidated to 2-3 visits to collect all the waste.

On site there is NO reversing or tight space movement without an attendant on foot, in charge, of the driver and movements of the truck. No ifs/buts IN CHARGE.  I find that I'm blocking a truck driver from reversing 2-3 times per year and demand that the second person (there usually is one) in the cab, gets out and directs the driver and others moving around.  At a rough estimate 10-20 people die annually through truck drivers reversing without a safe working arrangement.

For such simple measures as - having an attendant on foot in charge - fitting a reversing speed limiter (been available for over 10 years as simple retro fit devices) - fitting a proximity detection system (again 10-20 years of these being available) and fit an automatic brake application device linked to the proximity detection. Rail and Air have a regulatory system with cojones  

Work also needs to change road layout & management. 2 people died at the junction of Vernon Place and Southampton Row, almost exactly 5 years apart but through identical left turning moves by drivers of large vehicles - yet just 2% of ALL traffic at that junction turns left - hardly any of this large vehicles.  The junction is tight - over 90 degrees, full lock turn into a 'choke' with guardrails, and a corner radius of just under 4 metres (6 metres is the minimum to comfortably make a left turn with a large vehicle and not have to approach on the far side of the road).  The solution is simple, 2 alternative routes exist so ban left turns and eliminate the hazard. Instead the coroner's call for a Rule 28 report delivered pages of waffle about cycle facilities but no mention at all of an immediate and simple solution.

Change must come and to start this we need published reports for crashes so all can see what happened and what needs to be done by way of remedy   
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The petition begins with a detail about a journey using Cross Country Trains (not GWR) and wrongly calls the standard walk-up off-peak fare, valid on all off-peak services, an advance purchase. Cross Country has perhaps the most appropriate cycle carriage policy, for a UK TOC which has a reservation system for seats and bikes (actually dummy seats on the system)  Only Cross Country has an iphone app which enables passengers to buy any advance fares left over, and any seat reservations available at midnight when the National Rail system wipes them - it is really good and saves me around 50% on many journeys - even more (c.80%) for AP trips between Glasgow and Edinburgh.  When on a Cross Country Train the Train Manager can also allocate a reservation to the seat you have taken - using current technology effectively.

I really cannot understand why this has got to the position of a petition, as no one has properly sat down and discussed the issue or bothered to even check what current demand for spaces is.  I'd highlight the cycle using commuters on the Severn Beach line who can be 50% of the fare paying passengers heading OUT to work at Avonmouth and Filton North. For many years they have monitored the number of bikes and the number of passengers on their trains, and engaged with GWR on the need for capacity (average of 12.5 bikes per train in 2015, using available spaces as agreed with GWR, given that only about 25% of the seats are used going against the rush hour flows)   

Working with GWR many regular commuters into Paddington keep a bike in London, and park another bike at their starting station. Some own folding bikes - even 18 years ago I was counting 1 Brompton per carriage on morning trains from Reading, and some even hire a Brompton for the days they commute (a year's hire is less than 50% of the price of a London Zones 1&2 supplement). Brompton Hire is available at Ealing, Reading, Oxford, Didcot, and 2 Bristol stations.  Oxford is mentioned and staff there work a very slick system with the train crew on incoming trains, and many working at Harwell Culham &c travel on peak hour trains TO London as they leave the train before it gets busy further down the line. Again some discussion, and objective evidence of the need, might find ways to sort the everyday need for wheels for that short regular commuter journey - remember too that Oxford Tube Coaches carry bikes - often 2-3 bikes (3-4% of seated capacity) on the main commuter journeys between Oxford and London, and really handy for those travelling from Lewknor, where Police can tow away badly parked cars.

Bike hire - like that in Bath is also an option, and other schemes operate in Slough, Reading, and Oxford. The Bath scheme can be linked to work with company i/d cards, and pensioners' bus passes, but the other schemes appear to be stand-alone at present, a clear issue to work on. Some schemes can be self funding (or support core costs) through sale of bike branding (Copenhagen has run for over 20 years on this basis, and the Bath scheme is part of an international system in 20 other countries, running commercially for over a decade)

Consider also the acceptance of bikes which are dismantled, and wrapped so that they can be placed in luggage racks, the way that most long distance trains across mainland Europe carry bikes without any need to pay a bike fee or reserve the space. We got 8 bikes plus 1 wheelchair user on a 3-coach train (passenger total 76 - seats 180) on one Paddington-Twyford weekend trip, with a couple of bikes in the luggage racks which they fit with the front wheel removed.  A colleague making regular trips to Bedwyn reckoned 10% of passengers travelling with bikes as a pretty consistent count - on the part-filled trains.  London groups heading out for Sunday rides really make headline figures - one record has 70% of the fare paying passengers with bikes - albeit with just 12% of the train seats filled! 

Ultimately we need a GWR Stakeholder Group for cycling and rail, bringing in local councils, employers, as well as the cyclists and train operator, and then some amazing things can be delivered.
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
The immediate action to prevent any repeat of this event should be to place a traffic island on the left side of the middle lane at this junction extending to the swept area required for traffic coming from London, and turning to the right towards Kennington - A repeater traffic signal should then be placed on this island with a directional green lens showing straight ahead.

The left filtering lane, should ideally be moved to the left and given a traffic signal with a left turn directional green lens.  This, with the other traffic signals needs to be set-back for the pedestrian crossing point, and from this crossing point the Right turn/Straight ahead cycle lane which should start on the right side of the left turning motor traffic lane before the stop-line should be separated from the left turn lane between the crossing point and the junction at the roundabout.  A repeater set of cycle traffic signals may be needed for this short section, as the route for cyclists less happy about riding on the right hand side can be to cross at the traffic signals and move in to the cycle lane.

The position of the truck after the crash speaks volumes of the way the driver executed the left turn, late, and wide, with it apparent that there must have been traffic in the left hand lane when the driver pulled up at the stop line.

I'd agree that a Rule 28 report should have been called for.

Likewise I'd want to see what has been delivered by the roads authority by way of investigation of the incident (a duty they MUST undertake (Section 39.3.a RTA 1988)) either TfL or the Borough - Still just about Lambeth here - or Southwark? Then - and where the law shows a laughable naievete that investigating body tells itself what to change to prevent any future crashes Section 39.3.b and 39.3.c!         
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
Neither seesms to have got the realistic grasp of the fact that you must have ways to managed the commuting traffic which bike, car or bus, will (because it has to) follow the main transport routes established by the historic development of London. Cyclists and pedestrians won't P*** around on a meandering backwater route for daily utility travel. If (no when!) the traffic volumes reach Dutch levels there will have to be routes laid out to manage the cycle traffic as a distinct element of the mix, when volumes are smaller than the measures of matching speeds have a lot to commend them but perhaps with the Dutch detail on rarely having any junctions on cycling routes especially where any party has to stop. Just watch as 2 flows of cycle traffic are brought together to merge, cross over and separate rather than have a square cross-roads, avoiding all the hassle of having to stop and add in traffic controls to prevent collisions.

I sometimes think that those who design junctions and traffic signal systems are making up for the frustration of not having a decent train set when they were younger....   
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
Taxis, and small vans can be converted to gas-diesel hybrid by adding tanks and controls to a standard vehicle. The operator will make savings at the same time as slashing emissions. I'd suggest that a repayable advance is offered to convert the vehicles, and the savings made used to repay that advance.

The hybrid conversion means that the vehicle can operate on gas when it is available but can also run as a diesel of it runs out of gas. This will cover the period during which the availability of gas refilling points will not be sufficient to provide area-wide coverage.
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
What difference is a 20mph speed limit going to make for most Central London bus services?  Currently the timetabling average speed is well under 10mph, for the standards DOO buses, with the extra work boarding passengers, regulating the service etc all slowing down the services to about half the average speed that was delivered by the 2-person open platform RT's and RM's.

Clearing a multiplicity of part-loaded buses from Oxford Street, and turning the current through routes back - or via different onward journeys, reducing the Peak Vehicle Requirement by not having many of the buses required to maintain the route frequency stuck in a big red wall along Oxford Street....Potentially a massive reduction in the cost of running the services, because fewer buses (and drivers) are needed. 

Sometimes challenging the conventional approach can unlock a whole new way to run things, noting that in many US cities the downtown bus services, are free to use - as it is cheaper to do this than collect fares.   
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
Andrea, I'm going to investigate what the Bus Drivers Conductors, Inspectors & Passengers Regulations 1990 might have by way of helpful laws and associated protocols. In the past every driver and conductor had to have clearly on display, their PSV licence badge, much as taxi drivers should also have a badge on display, clearly showing their taxi DRIVER's licence number. 

Sadly this area of the law has been dropped, but in my view it is actually a vital detail for a professional driver responsible for carrying up to 100 people on a bus, to be readily identifiable.  The Conduct Regulations do, as I understand them, require a bus driver to give their driver number and employers details to any person reasonably requiring this, and after a dangerous manoeuvre I would consider it reasonable for a person affected by that action to request and be given those details. If injury or damage has been caused by the PRESENCE of the bus (note it does not require the bus to hit you, should you be forced to crash by the way the bus is being driven), then section 170 RTA 1988 requires the driver (of any vehicle) to provide mandated details.  Most London Buses operators, given their 'hit rate' provide drivers with 'Section170' or 'Bump' Cards to complete the necessary exchange without having to argue at the scene, or the drive admit any liability in the heat of the moment.

I'd be interested in having some discussion with those having a better grasp of legal issues, on the options of sitting down on the front step of the bus, and patiently requesting that the driver provides the details you require, and perhaps a 101 call to report the need to secure CCTV evidence from the bus.  There will be the registered operating base (the address which by law has to be displayed and readable from the left hand side of the bus), and the bus garage from which it operates (the 2-letter code which used to be on a small enamelled plate in a frame on the bus, usually by the driving cab) this gives a clue as to where the bus returns at night and CCTV can be downloaded.

Meantime, given that it is even more desirable now to identify a bus (and HGV) driver as someone who holds a valid licence for the vehicle being driven - Might I suggest a campaign to restore the wearing of licence number badges?
The charade hasn't stopped
The charade hasn't stopped
visionzerolondon.org
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
No mention was made at all of the role of the small light vehicle which was in front of the truck when it stopped at the traffic signals and clearly set off before and faster that the truck.

The police in their detailed analysis of the truck driver's actions noted that his speed at the moment of impact had barely reached 13mph and he STRUCK VENERA FROM DIRECTLY BEHIND with the front of the truck. It then took the driver 49 metres to stop - 49 metres to stop a truck from 13mph?  Was he not concentrating?

The Police did note that 'the noise from traffic on the A12' might have masked the noise of Venera's bike being hit and mangled by the truck, but provided no measurements of typical rush hour noise levels outside, nor whether the truck driver had the windows closed or radio or other sounds inside the cab masking his ability to competently be aware of what was happening outside.

But there is already a glaring issue that does not add up - how can a truck which has barely reached 13mph run into the back of a fit regular cyclist, who could easily be doing 20mph at this junction.

Let's track back to other evidence presented by the Police.  They gave details of the traffic signal sequence, showing how the 2 seconds lead on the cyclists getting a green light enabled cyclists at the forward stop line to clear the junction before the  motor vehicle set off from the rear stop line. This effectively gives a 3-4 second head start fr the front cyclists in the queue but not the many queuing behind them.  The Police description did not mention that the cyclists get their green light after the traffic circulating on the roundabout is stopped by a red light. Go and check many posted videos including a great one by SW19, and count the number of seconds for which the circulating traffic is signalled to stop but motor vehicle drivers continue to accelerate past the signal.  SW19 posted one where the green signal for cyclists to move off is clearly visible THROUGH the bus which has clearly driven past the red light. This traffic prevents cyclists from moving off for up to 4 seconds, by which time the faster motor vehicles are alongside and overtaking them to turn left.

Venera's family were insistent that she could not move off with the green signal because of traffic on the roundabout blocking her way forward the Police and Coroner refused to consider this as a possibility, stating very clearly - at least twice  that STATIONARY traffic on the roundabout could not have prevented her from moving away - was this a deliberately callous way of refusing to concede that the issue was MOVING traffic which was not stopping at the traffic signals.

We also had no attempt to identify or locate the light vehicle which was stated to have set off before the truck , and a seriously flawed construct that Venera had ridden past on the nearside (ie been going faster than the truck - easily possible but MUCH faster). She had not set off the nearside detection system - tested and proved to be working and then bee moving so slowly that a truck doing 13 mph managed to hit her hard enough to bring her down and run her over. IT DOES NOT ADD UP.

I have a possible sequence that may be plausible. The small vehicle in front set off and, with her progress being delayed by red-light running drivers on circulating traffic, Venera was 'cut-up' or even clipped by the mystery vehicle WHICH THE POLICE WERE UNABLE TO GET ANY DETAILS FOR.  This left her recovering from the shock of the first encounter and possibly stopped, when the truck driver then ran her down. If the small vehicel had been a light van it would ave effectively masked the view of her and her bike from the truck cab until the van had passed and left her (theoretically) visible on the nearside. BUT we were shown that from the driving position there was a huge blind spot area, not covered by the Class 6 or Class 5 mirrors extending from the front nearside quarter area - right into the zone that Venera would be emerging into from beside any vehicle which had been overtaking her on a fairly severe left hand bend , which also puts details on the inside of that bend outside the field of focus of the driver of a vehicle on the right hand side of the cab.

Now Mary Hassell, I very nearly got up and demanded the opportunity to challenge that claim about STATIONARY traffic and the omission of the key element of the traffic signal sequence at that Poplar Inquest. As it is Venera has in my eyes been wrongly blamed for her own demise and the opportunity to get a serious response to a further Rule 28 call and not that heap of waffle generated by your earlier call for one when Brian Holt was killed.

If I could afford it I'd pay the costs of getting the full evidence and the Inquest record and dig down to show where this verdict is so heavily flawed.  

   
Victim blaming part 2
Victim blaming part 2
visionzerolondon.org
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Dave Holladay commented on a post on Blogger.
I'd add that as well as checking for vehicles coming up behind the bus driver has to make sure those boarding the bus are safely seated, and complete collection of fares etc. The bus stop(s) are shoe-horned in so that there is the MINIMUM permitted distance(zig-zag markings) between the bus stop markings and the crossing permitted by the Traffic Signs manual (TSRGD Chapter 5).

Look also at the enclosed bus shelter and the REVENUE GENERATING illuminated 6-sheet poster at the end - extending along the kerb-line and partially masking the view of the pedestrians approaching the crossing for the bus drivers heading Eastbound.  Such features also have the effect of diverting the line of vision, a detail which had this been a railway collision would have featured in the published and objective investigation that would have been carried out. For any further detail in this case you will need to pay for sight of the Police and Coroners investigations - for rail, air and marine incidents all such investigations are published on-line with a clear declered intention that their findings provide a basis for others to learn from and avoid making the same mistakes.  The clear toll of 16 reported incidents, including 5 potential repeats of the fatal crash AT THE SAME LOCATION should have local people asking Cllr Benham "To have one fatal crash seems unfortunate to have potentially many more seems culpably careless".

Zebra Crossings have a dual delivery of diligence.  The drivers have to look for pedestrians crossing or about to cross AND the pedestrians have to make sure that approaching drivers are aware of their intention to cross, and are stopping.  By removing the potential for both parties to blindly assume that green means go without also checking that it is safe to do so, the management of the risk of driver and vehicle trying to occupy the same road-space as the pedestrian is made substantially more robust. Some London Boroughs are favouring Zebra Crossings against signal contolled ones for the very reason that both parties are forced to pay greater attention to the action of crossing the carriageway by the design and operation of the crossing.

In the Western Road situation the solution is, I'd suggest to have the crossing split with a generous central island that has a long lead-in distance where the drivers' view is squarely and solely focussed on a crossing of just one traffic lane in one direction as is the perdstrians' direction to look in.

Just a technical note though, this is a bus station, in a bus depot the speed limit is generally even lower (5mph).  
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