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DSM Industrial Engineering Ltd
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Stainless Steel Fabrication for Kitchens and laboratories
Stainless Steel Fabrication for Kitchens and laboratories

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Stainless Steel and the ’Spitfire of World War 1’

During the First World War stainless steel was used in the aircraft engines of BE2’s, RE8’s. DH2’s, Sopwith Triplanes, Sopwith Camels and SE5a’s.

The Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5 was a British biplane fighter aircraft of the First World War. It was developed at the Royal Aircraft Factory by a team consisting of Henry Folland, John Kenworthy and Major Frank Goodden. It was one of the fastest aircraft of the war, while being both stable and relatively manoeuvrable. According to aviation author Robert Jackson, the S.E.5 was: "the nimble fighter that has since been described as the 'Spitfire of World War One'".

The S.E.5 was powered by various engines, initially adopting a Hispano-Suiza 8 V8 engine.



Albert Ball

One of WW1’s S.E.5 pilots was Albert Ball. Albert Ball, VC, DSO & Two Bars, MC (14 August 1896 – 7 May 1917) was an English fighter pilot during the First World War. At the time of his death he was the United Kingdom's leading flying ace, with 44 victories, and remained its fourth-highest scorer behind Edward Mannock, James McCudden, and George McElroy.

Born and raised in Nottingham, Ball joined the Sherwood Foresters at the outbreak of the First World War and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in October 1914.

On 23 April 1917, Ball was under strict orders to stay over British lines, but still engaged the Germans five times in his Nieuport. In his first combat that day, using his preferred belly shot, he sent an Albatros into a spin, following it down and continuing to fire at it until it struck the ground. It was No. 56 Squadron's first victory. Regaining an altitude of 5,000 feet (1,500 m), he tried to dive underneath an Albatros two-seater and pop up under its belly as usual, but he overshot, and the German rear gunner put a burst of 15 bullets through the Nieuport's wings and spars. Ball coaxed the Nieuport home for repairs, returning to battle in an S.E.5. In his third combat of the day, he fired five rounds before his machine gun jammed. After landing to clear the gun, he took off once more, surprising five Albatros fighters and sending one down in flames. His fifth battle, shortly thereafter, appeared inconclusive, as the enemy plane managed to land safely. However, its observer had been mortally wounded.

Three days later, on 26 April, Ball scored another double victory, flying S.E.5 no. A4850, and one more on 28 April. This last day's fighting left the S.E.5 so battered by enemy action that it was dismantled and sent away for repair. The following month, despite continual problems with jamming guns in the S.E.5s, Ball shot down seven Albatroses in five days, including two reconnaissance models on 1 May, a reconnaissance plane and an Albatros D.III fighter on 2 May; a D.III on 4 May, and two D.IIIs the next day, 5 May. The second of these victims nearly rammed Ball as they shot it out in a head-on firing pass. As they sped past one another, Ball was left temporarily blinded by oil spraying from the holed oil tank of his craft. Clearing the oil from his eyes, he flew his S.E.5 home with zero oil pressure in an engine on the brink of seizure. He was so overwrought that it was some time after landing before he could finish thanking God, then dictating his combat report.

While squadron armourers and mechanics repaired the faulty machine-gun synchroniser on his most recent S.E.5 mount, A8898, Ball had been sporadically flying the Nieuport again, and was successful with it on 6 May, destroying one more Albatros D.III in an evening flight to raise his tally to 44. He had continued to undertake his habitual lone patrols, but had of late been fortunate to survive. The heavier battle damage that Ball's aircraft were now suffering bore witness to the improved team tactics being developed by his German opponents. Some time on 6 May, Ball had visited his friend Billy Bishop at the latter's aerodrome. He proposed that the pair attack the Red Baron's squadron at its airfield at dawn, catching the German pilots off guard. Bishop agreed to take part in the daring scheme at the end of the month, after he returned from his forthcoming leave. That night, in his last letter to his father, Ball wrote "I do get tired of always living to kill, and am really beginning to feel like a murderer. Shall be so pleased when I have finished".



Armistice Day

To donate to the British Legion please visit:

https://www.britishlegion.org.uk/get-involved/ways-to-give/make-a-donation


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#AlbertBall #Armistice #BritishLegion #SE5 #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Camel
https://www.bssa.org.uk/about_stainless_steel.php?id=82
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11/9/18
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Stainless Steel elevated to the height of luxury by Jeff Koons

Jeffrey Koons is an American artist known for working with popular culture subjects and his reproductions of banal objects—such as balloon animals produced in stainless steel with mirror-finish surfaces. He lives and works in both New York City and his hometown of York, Pennsylvania.

His works have sold for substantial sums, including at least one world record auction price for a work by a living artist. On November 12, 2013, Koons's Balloon Dog (Orange) sold at Christie's Post-War and Contemporary Art Evening Sale in New York City for US$58.4 million, above its high US$55 million estimate, becoming the most expensive work by a living artist sold at auction. The price topped Koons's previous record of US$33.7 million and the record for the most expensive living artist, held by Gerhard Richter, whose 1968 painting, Domplatz, Mailand, sold for US$57.1 million at Sotheby's on May 14, 2013. Balloon Dog (Orange) was one of the first of the Balloon dogs to be fabricated, and had been acquired by Greenwich collector Peter Brant in the late 1990s.

‘He's taken stainless steel — originally recognised as a modest material — and elevated it to the height of luxury,’ he begins. ‘Typically, luxury is consumed as a vehicle for transformation. In Koons’s work, we see exquisite process become the vehicle for the transformation of value (Scott Rothkopf)

The artist, himself, makes it hard not to side with his cynics. With his actor-model good looks and pristine custom-made suits, he further shirks the image of the subversive artist with remarks like, ‘Follow your bliss and it will take you to the true reality’ or ‘Weakness is not reaching the highest state of consciousness’. Of Made in Heaven, he says the work is about ‘the removal of guilt and shame.’ He distinctly backs away from the form of conventional art dialogue as well as comparison to his contemporaries, preferring to think about his work in the context of Picasso, Goya, and Duchamp.

As the artist himself explains, ‘The key impetus is the interior gaze. The journey inward offers confidence to take in the outside world.’

To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#JeffKoons #BalloonDog #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source:
https://www.christies.com/features/Jeff-Koons-in-Bilbao-6348-1.aspx
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Koons

Images:
http://www.saic.edu/150/jeff-koons-150th-anniversary-distinguished-alumni-lecturer
https://frieze.com/event/jeff-koons-0
https://www.alminerech.com/exhibitions/2727-jeff-koons
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11/2/18
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How bra and girdle tech, along with woven stainless steel, made the very first space suits

Bra and girdle technology and seamstresses on Singer sewing machines weaving Stainless Steel cloth were integral to NASA’s first spacesuits.

Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin are known for many things; being fashion plates isn’t one of them. When the Apollo 11 astronauts made their giant leap for mankind in 1969, however, they were wearing a type of “space couture” that shared a history - and, indeed, many of the same seamstresses - with what was essentially the Spanx of the time.

The seamstresses, who made the spacesuit cloth, had to piece together 21 gossamer-thin layers of highly technical fabrics — including a Teflon-coated silica-fiber cloth and a woven form of stainless steel — by “nesting them together like a Russian doll,” De Monchaux says. And they just used regular Singer sewing machines.

When ILC conducted its seamstress auditions, it preferred women — and it was always women — who had “extreme skill over extreme experience,” Lewis says. “[ILC and NASA] can teach someone who has very high skill level in sewing but they can’t unteach bad habits.

A single mistake, especially one that damaged the fibers, could result in a discarded suit. Work would have to start all over again. “There’s no seconds outlet for spacesuits like there is for bra manufacturers,” Lewis quips.

For the full article please visit: https://www.racked.com/2018/9/5/17771270/spacesuit-girdles-playtex-seamstresses-nasa


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#Spacesuit #Singer #NASA #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source/images/read more:
https://www.racked.com/2018/9/5/17771270/spacesuit-girdles-playtex-seamstresses-nasa

Image:
https://www.nasa.gov/topics/people/galleries/armstrong_may1969.html#.W9KyUlJReV4
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Harry Brearley - the father of Stainless Steel

Steelworker’s son Harry Brearley was on a mission - to create a metal that could resist heat.

In 1912, a small arms manufacturer asked Brearley’s company to find a material for rifle barrels that would not be eroded by high temperatures. Luckily he was a metallurgy obsessive. After leaving school aged 12 to become a laboratory bottle washer at the Sheffield steelworks where his father worked, he went to night classes to learn his trade. At the time cutlery was made from silver or plated with nickel and had to be polished. Sharp knives were made from carbon steel and would rust.

Brearley found his new alloy was not just rust- and heat-resistant but also repelled household acids such as vinegar and lemon juice. He immediately realised the implications for the cutlery industry. After months of experiments adding chromium to steel in August 1913 he created a new alloy, which he called Rustless Steel. An old school friend who had been helping him at Brown Firth Research lab suggested he call it Stainless Steel.

he discovery was to revolutionise the metallurgy industry and become a fixture of the modern world. It was quickly adopted by the British military for use in guns. Similar alloys were developed in Germany and the US, but Brearley is regarded as the father of stainless steel.

After falling out with his employers over patent rights, he became a director of another steel firm. He died in 1948 aged 77.

(Ref: https://www.britishlegion.org.uk/remembrance/ww1-centenary/thank-you/what-is-thank-you/pioneers/the-father-of-stainless-steel/)


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#HarryBrearley #britishlegion #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source/images/read more:
www.britishlegion.org.uk
https://www.britishlegion.org.uk/remembrance/ww1-centenary/thank-you/what-is-thank-you/pioneers/the-father-of-stainless-steel/

Visit the The Royal British Legion website to donate: www.poppyshop.org.uk
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Helix Bridge: the spectacular Stainless Steel bridge of Singapore

Ever heard of the Stainless Steel Helix Bridge? Probably not, but you can be sure that once you get to know this bridge, you will never forget it again. The reason is very simple: it is spectacular!

There is a saying that “the dream of the architect is the engineer’s nightmare,” portraying that the more beautiful the architecture of a building or monument, the more complicated it is for it to be built.

Stainless steel is used in all aspects of architecture, building and construction. While it has been used in this industry since the 1920’s and is not a new material, stainless steel’s use and range of applications has been growing. Some applications are highly visible and stainless steel is both aesthetic and functional, such as curtain wall and roofing. Others are practical, safety related and sometimes hidden, like masonry and stone anchors, bollards and safety railings.

The number of different stainless steel alloys used in building and construction has expanded. The more highly alloyed molybdenum containing stainless steels are preferred by leading architectural and landscape design and structural engineering firms for more corrosive locations because of their enhanced corrosion resistance.



To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#HelixBridge #Singapore #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source/images/read more:
Photos: Nicole Kinsman
https://www.imoa.info/molybdenum-uses/molybdenum-grade-stainless-steels/stainless-steel-architecture.php
https://dsmstainlessproducts.blogspot.com/2018/10/helix-bridge-spectacular-stainless.html
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10/12/18
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Concorde, home of Stainless Steel cutlery that even Andy Warhol couldn’t resist stealing!

In March 1969, just months before Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, Concorde made its maiden flight. The supersonic plane embodied a vision of the future as daring as that of Apollo 11 -- but far better looking.
No plane has captured the public imagination quite like Concorde, even though only 20 were ever built, and they were flown by just two airlines. Today, nearly 50 years on, it still stands as one of humanity's most remarkable engineering achievements, and a truly timeless piece of design.

"A lot of designs that were inspired by the dream and optimism of the jet age retain an air of the era in which they were born," said Lawrence Azerrad, author of the new book "Supersonic: The Design and Lifestyle of Concorde," in a phone interview. "They were futuristic at the time, but they definitely seem nostalgic now."But somehow, Concorde's design still remains futuristic, even though it was created in the very early 1960s. It's a vision of our future from our past."

Azerrad, a Los Angeles-based graphic designer, uses his book to showcase his impressive personal collection of Concorde memorabilia. Luggage tags, toys, cutlery, bottle openers, matches, coasters, vanity kits, wallets and even cognac flasks -- Concorde was a brand in itself, spawning merchandise that still commands high prices on eBay.

Taking a branded item home was part of the experience. Anything that could be removed from the plane would be taken by passengers as a souvenir. Some of these items were particularly sought after, like those designed by Raymond Loewy, the father of industrial design who created cabin interiors for Air France.

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"He used a very forward-thinking, futuristic approach for that time, down to the design of the seats, the headrests, the fabric and, probably more famously, the Stainless Steel flatware, which Andy Warhol would famously steal," said Azerrad. "There's a story where (Warhol) asked if the person sitting next to him was taking theirs, she said no and he took her set."

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To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#AndyWarhol #Concorde #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source/images/read more:
https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/concorde-supersonic-design-lifestyle/index.html
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style-7-0/concorde-how-the-supersonic-jet-zoomed-from-boom-to-bust-10415903.html
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9/21/18
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Incredible new invention! - Stainless Steel - to revolutionise cutlery as we know it!

According to Consul John M. Savage, who is stationed at Sheffield, England, a firm in that city has introduced a stainless steel, which is claimed to be non-rusting, unstainable, and untarishable. This steel is said to be especially adaptable for table cutlery, as the original polish is maintained after use, even when brought in contact with the most acid foods, and it requires only ordinary washing to cleanse.

“It is claimed;” writes Mr. Savage in the Commerce Reports, “that this steel retains a keen edge much like that of the best double-sheer steel, and, as the properties claimed are inherent in the steel and not dues to any treatment, knives can readily be sharpened on a ‘steel’ or by using the ordinary cleaning machine or knife board. It is expected it will be a great boon, especially to large users of cutlery, such as hotels, steamships, and restaurants.

“The price of this steel is about 26 cents a pound for ordinary sizes, which is about double the price of the usual steel for the same purpose. It also costs more to work up, so that the initial cost or articles made from this new discovery, it is estimated, will be about double the present cost; but it is considered that the saving of labor to the customer will more than cover the total cost of the cutlery in the first twelve month.’

Image: The announcement, as it appeared in the 1915 New York Times, of the development of stainless steel in Sheffield, England.

To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#NewYorkTimes #JohnSavage #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source/images/read more:
https://www.nytimes.com/1915/01/31/archives/a-nonrusting-steel-sheffield-invention-especially-good-for-table.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel#/media/File:Stainless_steel_nyt_1-31-1915.jpg
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Can 3D Stainless Steel printing reinvent the bicycle?

With over a century of experience, Reynolds has seen the shifting demand for customizable bicycles for road, touring, and mountain expeditions. Avid riders wanting to construct a personalized bicycle would commonly go to frame builders with purchased groupsets – an organized collection of mechanical bicycle parts – for bicycle assembly.

However, with the capabilities of 3D printing stainless steel and titanium, frame builders can create unique components and bicycle frames with shortened production processes. These customized components, that would otherwise be commercially unavailable, can be built to improve a cyclist’s riding experience.

Using metal 3D printing, Reynolds’ streamlined production process enables frame parts with cleaner edges and tighter tolerances. This removes the metering process for tubes on the bicycle – a time-consuming process for a frame builder.

Reynolds has also identified an increasing demand for production-run, semi-custom steel framesets. This is where its new range of parts will flourish within 3D production as there will no longer be a need for costly manufacturing processes involving file and emery cloth working on lugs and manual hacksawing.

3D printing also enables the production of far more intricate shapes than is possible with casting or forging. This allows the construction of internal pockets, which reduces the bicycle frame weight and holds internal cables.

Less time and money spent on traditional processes can then be translated into an aesthetically-pleasing, affordable, and high-performing bicycle.


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#Reynolds #3dprinting #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source/images/read more:
https://3dprintingindustry.com/news/can-3d-printing-reinvent-the-bicycle-latest-innovations-from-reynolds-and-arevo-136242/


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7/13/18
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The weird and wonderful Stainless Steel World Fair landmark

The Atomium, a concoction of nine stainless steel spheres, connected by interlocking tubes, is one of the symbols of the modern Europe. Sixty years after it was constructed for the Expo58 World’s Fair, it still lights up the Brussels landscape in unmistakable fashion (and dispenses widescreen views of the Belgian capital from its 335ft/102m-high top-floor restaurant).

To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#TheAtomium #Expo58 #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source/images/read more:
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/lists/buildings-worlds-fairs/
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6/29/18
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The story of France’s first tidal power station with Stainless Steel blades

In 1966, the first tidal power station with stainless steel turbine blades was completed in France. The Rance Tidal Power Station is a tidal power station located on the estuary of the Rance River in Brittany, France. In order to be able to construct the structure across the estuary, two dams had to be built to block the Rance river during the first two years of the construction phase to ensure that the estuary was completely drained. The reason that the Rance River estuary was chosen was due to its large tidal range; it actually has highest tidal range in France. It has an average tidal range of 8m between low and high tide, while the spring and neap range can be as big as 13.5m.

Its 24 turbines reach peak output at 240 megawatts (MW) and average 57 MW, a capacity factor of approximately 24%.

Salt water causes corrosion in metal parts. It can be difficult to maintain tidal stream generators due to their size and depth in the water. The use of corrosion-resistant materials such as stainless steel, greatly reduces, or eliminates, corrosion damage.


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#Rance #TidalPowerStation #StainlessSteelFacts #StainlessSteel

Source/images/read more:
https://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=8307
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_power

Pic:
A stamp showing Range Tidal Power Station
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