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Andrew Walmsley
11 followers -
Main interests: wildlife, the countryside and history of the countryside
Main interests: wildlife, the countryside and history of the countryside

11 followers
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Even the most nondescript wild flowers, such as this Common Centaury (Centaurium erythraea), have marvellous beauty when seen in close-up.
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Grey heron (Ardea cinerea) 'bill snapping' at the Welsh Wildlife Centre, Teifi Marsh, Pembrokeshire
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Grey heron (Ardea cinerea) 'bill snapping' at the Welsh Wildlife Centre, Teifi Marsh, Pembrokeshire. I can't easily explain this behaviour. It's apparently typical early in the breeding season when it's used as a threat display towards a competing heron, but this bird was alone and the breeding season was well past. It had been preening a few moments earlier and may have been trying to dislodge a bit of feather stuck in throat or mouth or, alternatively, and this seems unlikely, it might have been trying to catch passing insects. I'd be interested to hear whether anybody knows of any other explanation.
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A loving couple? In reality two badgers feeding on peanut butter placed on the fence post.
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Badger watching can provide some special moments. These badgers (Meles meles) were tempted to feed on peanut butter put out on fence posts adjacent to the sett.
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In the UK, hazel (Corylus avellana) catkins are welcome harbingers of spring that in the south often appear as early as late-January. The attractive "lambs' tails" are males, whilst the infrequently noticed females - just visible here at the tip of the twig - are barely visible. They are wind pollinated.
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The hazel's female flower in close-up
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Hi, I'm new to this community (and to Google+).
These scarlet elf cups (Sarcoscypha coccinea) were found a few days ago growing on the roots of either willow or birch - not sure which - in Northumberland, UK. They brighten the winter woodland floor.
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Yellow-billed Spoonbill (Platalea flavipes) touching down beside a pool in Thornley, Perth, Western Australia.
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