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Gianmario Scotti (Mario)
6,044 followers -
A micro-and-nanoscientist. In love with chemistry, physics and math.
A micro-and-nanoscientist. In love with chemistry, physics and math.

6,044 followers
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In brief: first 3D printed microreactor with integrated stir bar and ion source for direct coupling to a mass spectrometer and real-time chemical reaction monitoring. See more in the video and in the article on ResearchGate.

In detail: we recently published an article about a polypropylene microreactor coupled to a mass spectrometer for chemical reaction analysis. We also prepared a short video explaining our idea and the study in general.

The microreactor has an integrated stirring bar and a nano-electrospray needle. It is the first 3D printed/additively manufactured microreactor with these components integrated during the 3D printing process.

The nano-ESI needle is the ion source of our microreactor, and is used to couple it directly to a mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer analyses the chemical reactions. Furthermore, the reaction is analysed as it happens.

We used polypropylene as the microreactor material because PP is a highly inert polymer in the sense that it is resistant to strong acids, alkaline solutions, or the great majority of solvents used in chemical synthesis.
The integrated ion source and stirring capability enable us to monitor the chemical reactions in real time: first the reagents are infused in the reaction chamber using syringe pumps. Once the desired volume has been infused, pumping is interrupted and we start the stirring. At the same time, or a bit earlier, we start monitoring the reaction with the mass spectrometer.

In our study we successfully analysed a Diels-Alder and retro Diels-Alder reaction. The reagents are a trans-cyclo-octene and methyltetrazine. More information about the reactions is available in the supplementary information. We also publish, in the supplementary info, detailed instructions on how to 3D print the microreactor and even the measurement jig.

The link to the article is http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2017/re/c7re00015d#!divAbstract The article will become Open Access in due course (few days).
In the meantime, download the article from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315119578_A_miniaturised_3D_printed_polypropylene_reactor_for_online_reaction_analysis_by_mass_spectrometry

About myself: I received my doctorate in materials science from Aalto University in Finland in 2014. The topic of my thesis was microfabricated fuel cells. My current project is microreactors for mass spectrometric chemical analysis.


https://youtu.be/Gy37EuQM_j0

#3dprinting
#polypropylene
#microreactor

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An opportunity to hear one of the most performed living composers. Arvo Part's complete piano collection

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On Friday we published an article about a 3D printed polypropylene microreactor coupled to a mass spectrometer for chemical reaction analysis. We also prepared a short video explaining our idea and the study in general.

The microreactor has an integrated stirring bar and a nano-electrospray needle. It is the first 3D printed microreactor with these components integrated during 3D printing.

The nano-ESI needle is the ion source of our microreactor, and is used to couple it directly to a mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer analyses the chemical reactions. Furthermore, the reaction is analysed as it happens.

We used polypropylene to 3D print the microreactor because polypropylene is a refractory polymer in the sense that it is resistant to strong acids, alkaline solutions, or the great majority of solvents used in chemical synthesis.
The integrated ion source and stirring capability enable us to monitor the chemical reactions in real time: first the reagents are infused in the reaction chamber using syringe pumps. Once the desired volume has been infused, pumping is interrupted and we start the stirring. At the same time, or a bit earlier, we start monitoring the reaction with the mass spectrometer.

In our study we successfully analysed a Diels-Alder and retro Diels-Alder reaction. The reagents are a trans-cyclo-octene and methyltetrazine. More information about the reactions is available in the supplementary information. We also publish, in the supplementary info, detailed instructions on how to 3D print the microreactor and even the measurement jig.

The link to the article is http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2017/re/c7re00015d#!divAbstract The article will become Open Access in due course (few days).
In the meantime, download the article from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315119578_A_miniaturised_3D_printed_polypropylene_reactor_for_online_reaction_analysis_by_mass_spectrometry


https://youtu.be/Gy37EuQM_j0

#3dprinting
#polypropylene
#microreactor


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We just published an article about a 3D printed polypropylene microreactor coupled to a mass spectrometer for chemical reaction analysis. Along with the article, we also made a video abstract.

This microreactor has an integrated stirring bar and a nano-electrospray needle. It is the first 3D printed microreactor with these components integrated during 3D printing.

The nano-ESI needle is the ion source of our microreactor, and is used to couple it directly to a mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer analyses the chemical reactions. Furthermore, the reaction is analysed as it happens.

We used polypropylene to 3D print the microreactor because polypropylene is a refractory polymer in the sense that it is resistant to strong acids, alkaline solutions, or the great majority of solvents used in chemical synthesis.
The integrated ion source and stirring capability enable us to monitor the chemical reactions in real time: first the reagents are infused in the reaction chamber using syringe pumps. Once the desired volume has been infused, pumping is interrupted and we start the stirring. At the same time, or a bit earlier, we start monitoring the reaction with the mass spectrometer.

In our study we successfully analysed a Diels-Alder and retro Diels-Alder reaction. The reagents are a trans-cyclo-octene and methyltetrazine. More information about the reactions is available in the supplementary information. We also publish, in the supplementary info, detailed instructions on how to 3D print the microreactor and even the measurement jig.

The link to the article is http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2017/re/c7re00015d#!divAbstract The article will become Open Access in due course (few days).
In the meantime you can download the article from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315119578_A_miniaturised_3D_printed_polypropylene_reactor_for_online_reaction_analysis_by_mass_spectrometry


https://youtu.be/Gy37EuQM_j0

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Would music labels/publishers abuse the copyright system from Youtubers? Are you f'kin kidding me, OF COURSE they would! Another example of the evil of copyrights.
So I think I understood better how copyfraud works. Sometime ago I used a music recording (La Mer - 1 - De laube a midi sur la mer by Claude Debussy
Artist: US Air Force Band) for a new edit of a film I made with some friends.

I uploaded the film to Youtube and got a notification, that "Ads might appear on your video. Copyrighted content was found in your video. The claimant is allowing their content to be used in your YouTube video. However, ads might appear on it." due to a Content ID claim by NaxosofAmerica on behalf of: Altissimo.
I made another edit only containing the recording and indicating the PD source and waited for the Content ID claim to pop up again. Then I filed a dispute via the internal Youtube system, explaining that the source of the recording is the musopen.org website and that there are strong indications that it is published in the public domain. I was arguing along the lines of http://freesoftwaremagazine.com/articles/musopen_org_public_domain_performances_public_domain_music/
"[W]hen works are created by US government employees in the course of their professional duties, those works fall directly into the public domain without ever becoming copyrighted. That's why everyone is free to use so much of that gorgeous NASA space imagery that you'll find plastered all over the web (if you've somehow missed out on this, let me recommend the JPL Photojournal as a good starting point).
This includes the military, and more to the point, the various US Armed Forces bands: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard (the five forces which make up the five sides of the Pentagon, for those who are not familiar with the US military). All of these forces maintain bands with very talented performers, and their concerts are often on part with the big-city philharmonic orchestras. They also have a fun tendency to play the really recognizable up-beat works that are probably in the most demand for mood music."

What happened is, that Naxos music released their copyright claim on my video. But here comes the thing: This seems to work only on a claim by claim basis - meaning the recording is still on the content ID list and gets still automatically claimed every time somebody uses this recording.
I wonder how many public domain titles are being monetized like this and I was somewhat surprised that Youtube doesn't have a better system to positively ID public domain content. I think this is called copyfraud. And I don't think it's right, that when somebody posts actual public domain content, that they have to go through lenghty redundant processes of validation...

https://youtu.be/P-Q85zmN-AU

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I am against the death penalty in general, but would make some exceptions, like in the following case:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-15/belle-gibson-wellness-blogger-decision-handed-down/8355236

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