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Travis Faubel
Works at Elder Ford of Tampa
Attended Universal Technical Institute
Lives in Tampa, FL
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Travis Faubel

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FlashFire v0.50: Open to the public

With this release, FlashFire leaves Google's awkward BETA program, and is available through the Play store for everyone.

This does not mean FlashFire should no longer be considered BETA or dangerous, and it definitely doesn't mean it's feature complete.

This does mean you can now leave ratings and comments. Everybody who leaves a 5 star rating might get a warm and fuzzy feeling for a second or two, so what's keeping you?

I've also created a small website for FlashFire located at http://flashfire.chainfire.eu/ , containing quite a bit of information on FlashFire usage and specifics. If you squint, it might even look like a manual.

This update works around all known issues with N Preview, and adb backup/restore functionality has also received some much needed bugfixes.

Unfortunately, I've had to revert lz4 compression back to the single threaded model, as the multi-threaded implementation will occasionally segfault during restore. I hope to find a proper fix for this soon, as this revert may reduce backup/restore performance.

Discussion, suggestions and bugreports should keep going the XDA thread as usual: http://forum.xda-developers.com/general/paid-software/flashfire-t3075433

Changelogs
- Fix compatibility with N Preview 3 (in used libraries)
- Added 'Restore from ADB' option to 'No backups found' dialog
- NP3: Work around ART crash
- NPx: Work around 'adb restore' bug by using 'adb push' instead
- 4.2: Fix StatFs crash
- ADB: Authorize all connections
- ADB: Fix restoring not doing anything on some devices
- Force 'clear cache' option to show UI
- Include filesize in cache validation
- (Temporarily?) Switched back to single-threaded lz4 implementation due to the multi-threaded version occasionally segfaulting
- Add choice for visiting either FlashFire's website or the XDA thread when tapping the top card
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Dear Google TV developers,

With the launch Android 5.0, Lollipop, Android TV is now fully launched, and we’re working closely with OEMs to release Android TV devices going forward. By extending Android to the TV form factor, living room developers get the benefits, features and the same APIs available for Android phone and tablet development. Going forward, we will focus our living room efforts on growing the Android TV and Google Cast ecosystem.

What does this mean for Google TV? Existing Google TV devices and all of the features of these devices will continue to work, and so will the apps you’ve developed for the Google TV platform. A small subset of Google TV devices will be updated to Android TV, but most Google TV devices won’t support the new platform. We expect to see an exciting lineup of Android TV devices in the coming year, including TVs from Sony, Sharp, and Philips, as well as other set-top and over-the-top boxes.

Thank you for being passionate developers creating great content and apps for the living room. With this shift, we encourage you to transition your living room development efforts to Android TV apps and Cast-enabled apps. While the Google TV libraries will no longer be available, we’ve made it really easy to transition apps to Android TV using familiar Android development tools, as well as our new Leanback support libraries. Learn more at developer.android.com/tv.

We can’t wait to see what you imagine and create for the living room!
 
- The Google and Android TV teams
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That left front tire has(had) a big ass bubble in the sidewall. Might wanna do something about that if it hasn't blown yet.

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This is a pretty good overview in Ars on Marshmallow.  While looking through it, I saw some things that could use more explanation so thought I'd share my comments.

Extended Voice Actions:
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/10/android-6-0-marshmallow-thoroughly-reviewed/4/

The discussion about how applications work with the new voice interaction service may be a little misleading.  As with Now on Tap, applications here don't directly interact with Google; rather they go through a platform API (https://developer.android.com/reference/android/app/VoiceInteractor.html for those who care) which interacts with the back-end speech recognition service.  So I wouldn't describe this as developers plugging in to the Google App -- they are using the platform API, which has a back-end plugged in to it (by default via the Google App) that does the recognition.

This is very much how Now on Tap is integrated into the platform, as described in the previous section.  In fact, it isn't very much like, it is it!  Now on Tap and the new voice interaction are all part of the currently enabled VoiceInteractionService, which is what you are selecting when you select which assistant you want.  (This is also why voice actions can now use the context of what you are currently looking at to help with the recognition, because it is also the assistant so it that can do that.)

So, it wouldn't make sense for this to move to a Google Play Services API, because it is a very well-defined platform API.  This also isn't really the first time this pattern has appeared: it is basically how input methods work, where platform APIs arbitrate interaction between the application and the current back-end input method.  More closely, speech-to-text and the old simple speech recognizer are both pluggable components, which applications interact with through a (simple) platform API to whatever back-end implementation the user has selected.

Permissions:
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/10/android-6-0-marshmallow-thoroughly-reviewed/5/

On the topic of organization of "permissions," while I would agree there is some further cleanup that can happen in the UI, in many cases things are deliberately not simple runtime permissions.  For example, the new "Draw over apps" and "Modify system settings" controls actually correspond to existing permissions, which we explicitly didn't want to turn into simple runtime permissions.  We want to discourage apps from using them unless they have a really good reason, and they don't have anything to do directly with specific personal data access so are really hard to explain to users.

You'll note there is a warning dialog that appears when enabling an app's access to one of these, giving more information about what is happening.  This is also a pattern followed by other existing dangerous access controls like accessibility services and usage access.

Speaking of accessibility, if anything we'd like to see that made less easy for apps to get to.  This feature really is intended for accessibility services, and you should be skeptical about any other kind of app asking for access to it -- it gives that app almost complete control over your device and the ability to see everything you do on it!

Also fwiw, the new runtime permissions implementation makes use of app ops for applying permissions restrictions to pre-M applications.  You can basically see this as the long desired UI for app ops, and app ops' basic behavior remains the same where turning off access means the app simply sees no data (no location, zero contacts, etc).  We never create fake data.

Doze:
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/10/android-6-0-marshmallow-thoroughly-reviewed/9/

Abuse of high priority messages have a special difference from other things like notifications: they must go through Google servers, so Google can monitor and modify what is being sent to devices.  If apps abuse these for other things besides their intended use, we will be able to stop that abuse without touching any software on the device.  (Also "abuse" here is much less subjective than for notifications, where there is a large gray area of things some users care about and some don't.  For high priority messages, if it isn't something that is time critical to go to the user immediately, it is not appropriate.)

Chrome Custom Tabs:
http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2015/10/android-6-0-marshmallow-thoroughly-reviewed/10/

This isn't really tying an app to Chrome.  It is defining an extended API with the browser than an app can use to get the behavior.  The standard implementation used by apps should work with any browser as long as it supports the API, regardless of what the default browser is.  So Firefox and others should be able to implement the same API as Chrome and get the same behavior from the same apps.
Marshmallow brings a lot of user-requested features but still has no update solution.
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Nexus factory images for Android developers.
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Going forward Chromium will encrypt cookies¹ with your operating system's mechanisms before writing them to your hard drive. This could be useful in preventing malicious access to data from cookies stored on your hard drive, for instance.

If you run Chrome OS your entire profile directory is already encrypted by default.

¹ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_cookie

Source: https://codereview.chromium.org/24734007
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Introduction
I'm an auto technician living a conscious vegan lifestyle. I'm also a fan and enthusiast of everything Google. namely; Android, Chrome, Chrome OS, all Google Apps, open source.

Let's share positivity and vegan ideals!
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Nexus for life. cr-48 pilot!
Education
  • Universal Technical Institute
    Automotive Technology, 2006 - 2007
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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In a relationship
Work
Occupation
Service Technician
Employment
  • Elder Ford of Tampa
    Technician, 2009 - present
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Tampa, FL
Previously
Dover, DE - Mandeville, LA
Horrible office staff. One big dumpster too far away. Too many visitor spots. What about the residents? Cars get vandalized, security is a fat(literally) joke. Maintenance enters WITHOUT PERMISSION. Don't move in here.
Public - 2 months ago
reviewed 2 months ago
Good location, service. Shower is only hot or cold, doesn't blend temps. Didn't call to get resolved yet.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Went to Fresh harvest for dinner, all of my food except for the plate that was made in front of me was cold. Not going back for $27
Public - 7 months ago
reviewed 7 months ago
Popeye's has the best chicken.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
58 reviews
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Very very good sushi. Best I've had in the area. Amazing every time. Very friendly staff.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago