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Lauren Westafer
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Lauren Westafer commented on a post on Blogger.
Nadia,

Thank you for covering this topic. I recall debating this on Twitter with Dr. Seth Trueger and others last year at SMACC and discussing this with you at The Teaching Course last Spring. I think it's important, in this era of increasing live Tweeting for speakers to take ownership. I personally believe that tweets may serve as important feedback for the speaker. Perhaps tweets misrepresent a speaker's message secondary to poor delivery, logistic confusion, speed of content delivery, or innundation with too much content. Alternatively, a speaker may learn from an audience tweeter by access to additional information (references, studies, etc) to either alter the argument or counter these concerns in future presentations. Personally, I mulled over tweets from my SMACC and Teaching Course talks as a reflective exercise on how well I presented and things to improve upon. While Twitter is typically a polite crowd, I've discovered I can learn more in this forum, as a speaker, than face to face feedback. For example, during Essentials of EM the slide design was critiqued (one praised, several called to improve upon)(https://mobile.twitter.com/emswami/status/531517333756706816). At ACEP 2014, Dr. Joe Lex called for the same with #BadSlideBingo. While written feedback has been invaluable in my engagements speaking to my residency and my role as a toxicology lecturer to pharmacy students; yet, I haven't recieved constructive feedback in this format from conferences. I am excited to see how Twitter plays a role in learning from the audience and as a speaker.. Great post!
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