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The Conservation Decisions Team
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Providing informed decisions to best conserve biodiversity
Providing informed decisions to best conserve biodiversity

116 followers
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What makes a fish want to live in the desert?

Citation: Nicol S, Haynes TB, Fensham R, Kerezsy A (2015). Quantifying the impact of Gambusia holbrooki on the extinction risk of the critically endangered red-finned blue-eye. Ecosphere 6(3):41. DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES14-00412.1 Did you know that…
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Can climate change and biodiversity loss be tackled together by restoring forests? Our recent published papers investigate how and where carbon farming in Australia can be targeted to sequester carbon and benefit wildlife and threatened ecosystems. This…
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… improve the protein uptake and therefore the health of millions of people globally; …reduce the land clearing and use of pesticides while obtaining economic profit; …reduce the carbon dioxide an methane emission In our  new paper:Exploiting a pest…
eating insects to ...
eating insects to ...
conservationdecisions.org
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Targeting threats alone "won't save our wildlife" ... so what would? @ayeshatulloch @ceed @iadinec

I was fortunate to be a co-author on the paper recently published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment led by Viv and Ayesha Tulloch, “Why do we map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make better conservation decisions.” (see media…
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Summary: This talk highlights some of the recent work that Dr Virginia Matzek has done in California, as well as her planned work in Australia. The first part of the talk will treat a survey of managers’ research needs for invasive plant management in the state. As a follow-up to this work, we went to the literature to see what had actually been published relevant to California invasive plant management, and documented some mismatches in the topic, scope, and approach of scientific research, when compared with managers’ needs. The second part of the talk discusses whether managers can expect to recoup the cost of restoration of riparian forest in California via the state’s new compliance market for carbon credits. Both of these themes–the potential mismatch of perspectives, and the need to measure ecosystem services resulting from restoration–turn up in the work I’m planning to do here in Australia. I’ll close with a brief account of our proposed work surveying Australian managers and members of the general public for their perspectives on the desirability of ecosystem services as a project goal for restoration.

Bio: Virginia Matzek is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences at Santa Clara University in California, USA. The primary focus of her lab is on linking ecosystem services to ecological restoration. A plant ecologist and biogeochemist by training, she now finds herself interested as much by why people restore ecosystems as by how they do it. She will be at CEED working with Kerrie Wilson and Marit Kragt until mid-December 2014.
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Complementarity saves more species, simple stuff!

Our manuscript on how complementarity can help saving more species per dollar spent is available online. If you are interested in cost-effectiveness analysis, PPP, priority threat management, expert elicitations, or the Pilbara, have a look: Chades, I.,…
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Last 2014 CDTxEDG. Bringing managers perspectives to bear on habitat restoration and ecosystem services in California and Aus. by V Matzek

Friday 7th of November, from 3-4 pm in room GA604, ESP, Dr. Virginia Matzek (Santa Clara University, California) will present her research on “Bringing managers’ perspectives to bear on habitat restoration and ecosystem services in California and…
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CDT x EDG seminar series #12: Dr. Ronny Groenteman

2 for 1: New Zealand’s weed biocontrol in a nutshell plus a close-up examination of a case study on what we could do to overcome biocontrol scepticism  Ronny Groenteman1, Simon Fowler1, Jon Sullivan2, Yvonne Buckley3, Rob Salguero-Gómez4 1Landcare…
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New paper published in Basic & Applied Ecology on historical demography of Lantana camara L., that reveals clues about the influence of land use and weather in the management of this widespread invasive species.

Lantana camara is a beautiful plant but is also ranked in the top 100 nastiest weeds worldwide. L camara has spread from its native Central and South America to around 50 different countries, including in Australia. In these countries L. camara will…
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Greetings everyone - It is time for the monthly CSIRO/UQ joint hangout seminar series (Friday 3pm, Brisbane Time, Australia). This Friday’s Dr. +Jean-Baptiste Pichancourt from CSIRO will be presenting Livelihood diversification co-benefits humans and nature in forest commons. See below for more information.
For people in Brisbane the seminar room is at Ecoscience Precinct, room GA603. Beers and snacks will be available after the talk as part of the social club (only virtual beers&snacks provided for people attending through the web).

Summary: Many countries are pressured to engage economic diversification policies to sustain growth in volatile economic and climate contexts, while reducing pressure on common-pool natural resources. In forest commons, practical issues undermine local government efforts to engage such economic reforms; including the long-term risks on forest biodiversity, livelihoods and ecosystem services of entrusting a more diverse portfolio of species to manage, harvest and sell to empowered local communities. For this reason, legitimate conflicts between state, market and community stakeholders frequently arise from this effective lack of trust. With so much at stake, scientific guidance can help with building trust between parties to achieve sustainable human-nature integration in forest commons through livelihood diversification.

In the presentation I will show with a modeling approach, combined with available biological and social knowledge from the literature, that entrusting to local communities a more diverse portfolio of species to manage, harvest and sell for timber and fuelwood, could paradoxically co-benefit the long-term tree biodiversity, carbon biomass and harvesting incomes under climate change. Results show that this approach is at least as good or arguably better in term of co-benefits, than land-sparing strategies aimed at guaranteeing optimal biodiversity return in conservation zones (but locked from people for harvesting) and adjacent to high-yield mono-specific stands optimally harvested for timber, firewood or carbon (but poor in biodiversity).

This work suggests that reconciling human and nature objectives in forest commons do not necessarily need hard and prescriptive social-ecological transformations, e.g. through land-sparing. Rather I demonstrate the potential of a softer and non-prescriptive adaptation alternative for local people, which supports the rights of communities to manage, harvest and supply freely (under certain land-tenure, power and rule-making conditions discussed in the paper) the level of diversity of non-threatened tree species that matches their needs in forest commons. The present study and modeling framework are opening novel ways for predicting when and how it becomes legitimate to integrate the harvesting activities of the 1.6 billion rural people, who depend from forests for their livelihoods, into sustainable development plans for areas pressured by unpredictable changes.
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