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Tim Hanlon
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Lives in Melbourne
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Tim Hanlon

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"Whatever happened to pungent, enigmatic titles like Three Days of the Condor or Cheers? A hint may be found by trolling the website of one of Hollywood’s competitors, YouTube, whose clips are just as brazenly titled. The hallmark of a YouTube name, after all, is literalism. Hence, such titular gems as "The Sneezing Baby Panda," “Talking Twin Babies,” “Very Angry Cat—Funny,” or the cryptic “Monkey Smells Finger and Falls Out of Tree.” YouTube is only one purveyor of an unvarnished, proudly concrete tone that's the lingua franca of the Internet."

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/movies/2011/11/i_hate_my_teenage_daughter_tower_heist_2_broke_girls_why_television_shows_and_movies_now_have_boring_straightforward_titles_.html?tid=sm_tw_button_toolbar
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Tim Hanlon

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Gizmag has a Google+ page, if that's your kind of thing

https://plus.google.com/105149739082983197804
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Tim Hanlon

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"I always felt to run a good company you had to have room for everybody -- you could always figure out a way to make room for smart people," Bushnell recently recalled. "So, we decided to have a night shift in engineering -- he was the only one in it."

http://gamasutra.com/view/news/37762/Steve_Jobs_Atari_Employee_Number_40.php
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Tim Hanlon

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"But logging out of Facebook only de-authorizes your browser from the web application, a number of cookies (including your account number) are still sent along to all requests to facebook.com. Even if you are logged out, Facebook still know and can track every page you visit."
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Tim Hanlon

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"The original version of the mining tax proposed by the Henry review into Australia‘s future tax system, the Resource Super Profits Tax (RSPT), would, at current commodity prices, have collected more than $200 billion in additional mining taxes over the coming decade. Unfortunately, the $22 million advertising campaign run by the mining companies against the RSPT resulted in a much less effective, and much less equitable, mining tax being agreed to by government. According to Treasury the new mining tax, the new Mineral Resource Rent Tax will raise an extra $38.5 billion in taxes from miners over the coming decade. The return on the $22 million advertising campaign is likely to be in the order of $160 billion – or some 730,000%."
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Tim Hanlon

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"Most people are familiar with Moore's Law, the doubling of computer power roughly every 18 months. But as technology becomes more mobile "Koomey's Law" may be more relevant to consumers. Dr. Jon Koomey and his colleagues recently completed a study showing that energy consumption for computing is improving just as fast as processing power."
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Tim Hanlon

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"What does a napkin tell you about a restaurant? Quite a lot. A restauranteur friend told me about a survey that showed a massive correlation between category of napkin and customer satisfaction. That’s not to say you can hand out deliciously thick napkins in a shitty burger joint and immediately win customers over. It’s a cause and effect thing. The napkin represents a degree of care, preparation and devotion that goes above and beyond asking if they want fries with that."
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Tim Hanlon

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"Structures, in the sociological sense, constrain human agency. And for that reason, I see John Pike as a casualty of the system, too. Our police forces have enshrined a paradigm of protest policing that turns local cops into paramilitary forces. Let's not pretend that Pike is an independent bad actor. Too many incidents around the country attest to the widespread deployment of these tactics. If we vilify Pike, we let the institutions off way too easy."

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2011/11/why-i-feel-bad-for-the-pepperspraying-policeman-lt-john-pike/248772/
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I think the point of the Stanford experiment is that perfectly healthy normal people will "abuse" power if they are put in a position where oversight allows or encourages it - we can't expect to hire cops who will refuse to pepper spray peaceful protesters simply because it sounds like a bad thing to do. We, as a society, have to explicitly create structures that protect the weak from the strong and then continually evaluate those structures to make sure they are really working. If the whole structure has failed, we can't blame the guy holding the can of mace for any more than his personal actions, and if there are several people holding slightly emptier cans of mace then it's time to do some larger scale evaluation.

I'm not saying we should let cops off the hook, but saying that the repeated incidents of violent action specific to a certain set of police indicate a need for an adjustment of culture, which is ultimately the responsibility of management. If the management can't or won't fix the problem than the people have a responsibility to remove and replace them.
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Tim Hanlon

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"Henry Nicholas isn’t just another tech-boom billionaire charged with backdating stock options. All the drive, arrogance, and aggression he poured into building microchip-maker Broadcom—one of the major success stories of the Internet Age—morphed into an increasing obsession with sex and drugs, according to federal prosecutors. The author investigates the allegations about Nicholas’s out-of-control world: the parade of prostitutes, the spiking of clients’ drinks with Ecstasy, and the secret lair he built underneath the Orange County mansion he shared with his wife and kids."

http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2008/11/nicholas200811
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Tim Hanlon

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Charles Bosse's profile photoTim Hanlon's profile photoLuke Danielewski's profile photo
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The good news is that the USA is so concerned with a Congress busy chasing windmills that our general lack of international engagement will probably stall any real collapse. It might be that the traders all sell everything they can, the market will go down a few hundred points... but then it will hit the point at which long term investors who look at Motorola, Ford, and Google will say "Eh, the products are still good, most of the world that could afford them yesterday can afford them today, and thank goodness I put all REAL savings in a credit union last year."
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Tim Hanlon

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"AS a child I lived next door to the Consul-General for Nauru. Nauru had enormous phosphate reserves and with the substantial mining profits bought towering office blocks in Melbourne. Forty years on, though, and Nauru is impoverished and a barren rock.

It makes you think our once-in-100 years terms of trade and seemingly inexhaustible resources will not last forever. The challenge is to transform this opportunity into a long-term economic framework, including advanced manufacturing, that sustains competitive advantage and productivity growth."
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Tim Hanlon

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One Link. Many many hours invested as consequence.
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